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1 in 4 young adults, 1 in 5 adolescents now prediabetic

Sectorseven

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,382

(CNN)Nearly a quarter of young adults and a fifth of adolescents in the United States have prediabetes, according to a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.
Prediabetes -- a condition wherein blood sugar levels are elevated, but not high enough to warrant a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes -- was estimated at 18% among adolescents ages 12 to 18, and 24% among young adults ages 19 to 34.
Experts say these numbers have risen over the past decade, putting young people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other conditions down the line.

Analyzing nearly 5,800 individuals included in a national health survey from 2005 to 2016, the study authors found that "the prevalence of prediabetes in male individuals was almost twice that in female individuals" -- 22.5% vs. 13.4% in adolescents and 29.1% vs. 18.8% in young adults.
Prediabetes was also more common among young people with obesity, which is also closely linked to Type 2 diabetes in adults. More than a quarter of obese adolescents and more than a third of obese young adults were found to have prediabetes -- versus less than 17% of individuals with normal weight in both age groups.

Overall numbers are even higher for adults. Roughly a third of adults -- or 84 million Americans -- have prediabetes, according to the CDC. Nine in 10 don't know they have it.
 
Nov 9, 2017
1,878
Scary. My sister was pre-diabetic until she lost 50 lbs with the Keto diet. The doctor actually told her she had to do it until the weight came off or get full blown type 2 diabetes
 

Sadsic

Member
Oct 25, 2017
689
New Jersey
both my parents have diabetes, but my ass dropped 80 lbs in the last year so i am currently not on the waiting list for sweaty sugar death

im pretty sure this shitty disease will creep up on me at some point though
 

Audioboxer

Member
Nov 14, 2019
918
While generalized, American diets and ways of eating are absolutely terrible.

There's some truth in the stereotypes when all statistics point to the same conclusions.

America needs a national health service, but any national health service would be a mess with how America is. Then again, maybe a national health service is what the country needs to start taking personal health and eating habits more seriously.

Cultural issues are huge in the country around fast food, soda and sugar/salt content. The health industry is also lobbied to fuck and is nowhere near as strict as the EU.

There also seems to be an increasing anti-science stance that warps the idea of body acceptance into fat glorification. Bigger is better, etc. As if one's body is immune to health problems simply because one thinks they are immune. That's ego, not reality.
 

mikeamizzle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
577
It really doesn’t seem that way in Connecticut. I know these are usually regional issues on that scale though. Sad to read that headline.
 

Krejlooc

Indie Game Dev
Verified
Oct 27, 2017
20,101
I was prediabetic about 6 months ago. Had to completely change my eating habits drastically to reverse it. It's possible, though. Just really hard to do.
 

DUFFMCWALIN

Member
Oct 29, 2017
502
Eugene, OR
Doctor told me I was on track to becoming prediabetic. I've lost 25 pounds so far and plan on doing 5 more (plus doing intermittent fasting). If you can and haven't recently, go see a doctor. I thought I was fine until I went in.
 

ruggiex

Member
Oct 27, 2017
778
The regular diet is ridiculously bad. I wore one of those continuous blood sugar monitoring device for 2 weeks just to get an idea of how food affects my sugar level throughout the day. Despite having relative good diet, it's still eye opening to see how much the sugar level rises and dips over the course of the day. I can only imagine how terrible the sugar level must be for people on regular diet and constantly snacking.
 

srsly?

Member
Feb 24, 2018
3,192
This is something which seriously concerns my boyfriend (whom himself contracted diabetes from a formerly-poor diet) about his youngest son. He was unfortunately raised in a household where the mom (bf's ex) always made meals very high in grease, sugar, calories, and refused to change her ways about it. Consequently, she indulged the youngest's perpetual appetite for pizza, chicken nuggets, and sugary junk. A doctor's visit last year, though, during which the physician warned him that he was dangerously prediabetic has finally caused him to curb his unhealthy cravings a bit. He's now 21 years old and still borderline obese.

The eldest son, though, once he left home for college dropped a crapton of weight and now subsists primarily on vegetables he grows himself. Much healthier than his baby brother, needless to say.