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2018-19 Season TV Cancellations/Pilots: End of an era. Possibly the world. As the Winchester boys say bye bye.

I wouldn't know for Canada, but it airs on Thursdays in the US.
Yeah. It was The Middle I was thinking of. CityTV aired it a day earlier in Canada.

Just so we're all clear, there won't be a new episode of "Mom" until Thursday, April 4. So don't expect to see it in the ratings charts (unless there's a rerun) until then.
Oh okay. Gives me time to catch up on things.

I was just curious because Big Bang Theory got listed as a rerun, and I had seen Mom on my guide.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,695
I'm loving American Gods, even if the new season isn't as grandiose or surreal as the first season, so I'm insanely excited for a third season. I was concerned when there was the story of showrunners slowly backing away when offered a third season, haha. Now that it's more straightforward, hopefully it gains some more fans heading toward a third season.
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,325
With the upcoming tenth anniversary of Glee, it reminds me how very little these actors have achieved since. Hyped up so much back then, and the only breakout stars are the villain and the scrappy new lead. Darren Criss is the only one that is still somewhat relevant outside of those.
 

Aiii

何これ
Member
Oct 24, 2017
3,322
With the upcoming tenth anniversary of Glee, it reminds me how very little these actors have achieved since. Hyped up so much back then, and the only breakout stars are the villain and the scrappy new lead. Darren Criss is the only one that is still somewhat relevant outside of those.
-Wins golden globe and an Emmy.
-"Somewhat relevant"

That aside, how often do TV actors ever really breakout beyond their hit show? I'd say Glee's yield is pretty much par for the course
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,325
-Wins golden globe and an Emmy.
-"Somewhat relevant"

That aside, how often do TV actors ever really breakout beyond their hit show? I'd say Glee's yield is pretty much par for the course
Somewhat relevant because aside from Versace he did like one or two episodes a year. And now he is the lead in the upcoming Batman Vs. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. From such a huge cast, you would expect more. Even Friends you had each of them failing a huge new show every year.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,195
With the upcoming tenth anniversary of Glee, it reminds me how very little these actors have achieved since. Hyped up so much back then, and the only breakout stars are the villain and the scrappy new lead. Darren Criss is the only one that is still somewhat relevant outside of those.
I guess whatshername is Supergirl and I assume the good singers ended up in theater or recording music.
 
Oct 25, 2017
15,300
Midwest
Finally decided to watch Videos After Dark...

This is terrible. Why did they think we wanted Bob Saget doing his weird voices again...

Just give my crass and dirty Saget but then again, this is on network TV...

So really what's the point of this? Kids saying swear words?

I won't be watching again which is unfortunate because I've always enjoyed Saget but this is like him at his worst imo.
 
Oct 25, 2017
13,034
Finally decided to watch Videos After Dark...

This is terrible. Why did they think we wanted Bob Saget doing his weird voices again...

Just give my crass and dirty Saget but then again, this is on network TV...

So really what's the point of this? Kids saying swear words?

I won't be watching again which is unfortunate because I've always enjoyed Saget but this is like him at his worst imo.
Hahaha, Bob Saget is hosting this? In 2019? Hahahahahhaha
 
OP
OP
berzeli
Oct 25, 2017
2,586
HBO Asia Unveils Three Original Series + renews coming-of-age Taiwan drama Teenage Psychic
On the first day of Hong Kong's Filmart industry confab, HBO Asia unveiled an ambitious trio of original series targeting international Chinese-language audiences and the growing Southeast Asian market.

The projects include the network's first sci-fi drama produced in Chinese, a fictional anthology series centered around food and a Taiwanese drama that takes place in the aftermath of a mass shooting.
Sci-fi project Dream Raider will follow a misfit team of scientists and cops who are trying to get to the bottom of a criminal conspiracy that exploits human consciousness. The eight-episode hourlong series draws together talent and production expertise from China, Hong Kong and
Taiwan, including actors Vivian Hsu, David Wang, Jason Wang, Weber Yang and Ellen Wu; executive producer and filmmaker, Cheang Pou-Soi; directors Daniel Fu and Simon Hung; and producer Freeman Xiang.
Food Lore, meanwhile, will be an eight-episode hourlong anthology series that explores the human condition through narratives inspired by Asian cuisines. Overseen by acclaimed Singaporean direct Eric Khoo, the series will be shot in eight Asian countries and directed by esteemed filmmakers from each territory, including Don Aravind (Singapore), Billy Christian (Indonesia), Takumi Saitoh (Japan), Ho Yuhang (Malaysia), Erik Matti (Philippines), Pen-Ek Ratanaruang (Thailand) and Phan Dang Di (Vietnam).
HBO Asian's third project — and perhaps the most daring new one — The World Between Us explores the aftermath of a fictional mass shooting in Taiwan, where the killer, the victims, the victims’ families, the media and the defense teams find their fates all intertwined. Directed by Lin Chun-Yang and written by Lu Shih-Yuan, the ensemble cast includes Taiwanese talents Alyssa Chia, James Wen and Wu Kang-Jen.
Am I posting this solely for the Food Lore pun (HBO Asia previously did a show called Folklore)? No, but it's a significant factor!

Syfy Nabs 'Wayward Children' Book Series for TV
Syfy is delving into a fantasy world — several, in fact — with its latest development project.

The NBCUniversal-owned cabler and Legendary TV have optioned author Seanan McGuire's Wayward Children books to develop as a TV series, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. Joe Tracz (Be More Chill, A Series of Unfortunate Events) has signed on to adapt the books.
The four-book series, beginning with Every Heart a Doorway, centers on a mysterious boarding school for students who have returned from trips to magical worlds where they were heroes or monsters and now have to readjust to being ordinary children. All of them are looking for a way back to their fantasy realms, but when students start turning up dead, those who remain team up to catch the killer — lest none of them ever get to go home again.
I was almost gonna say that the premise seems interesting, but my hate for Be More Chill is gonna override it. God, Be More Chill sucks (Stephen Sondheim agrees).
 

Cornballer

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,999
Maybe the $15 price includes Apple Music?

In other news...

‘You Vs. Wild’: Netflix Sets Interactive Bear Grylls Expedition Series
Netflix has set a new Bear Grylls adventure for next month. The streamer said today that You vs. Wild, an eight-episode interactive family series fronted by the survival expert and TV veteran, will premiere April 10.

Each episode features an interactive experience with multiple choices, where a user can direct the course of the story.

The Netflix logline: Dense jungles, towering mountains, brutal deserts and mysterious forests await, with tough decisions around every corner. In this groundbreaking interactive adventure series, you make all the decisions and whether or not Bear succeeds or fails is totally up to you.
 
Maybe the $15 price includes Apple Music?
That seems like the best choice.

For a while, Apple Music had a Video tab that just included original documentaries and Carpool Karaoke. $15 for some high profile TV shows and all the music you can stream on your AirPods, Apple TV, CarPlay™, and more devices tied into the Apple ecosystem is not a terrible deal. Ultimately, if you're tied into the Apple ecosystem, this deal is for you. If you're not, this deal is awful especially since iTunes runs like shit on Windows and you're probably going to need an Apple TV to access the content.

However, considering Spotify premium is now giving Hulu Premium w/ ads for free, this deal looks worse than ever.
 
I thought there were reports on Apple's streaming service being free for iOS and Apple TV owners? Or was that just a baseless rumor?
It'll probably be something like the Apple Music free trial program.
Also, lol:
“Amazing Stories,” a Steven Spielberg Reboot

Revival of the NBC series of the same name. After its own showrunner problems — the original producer’s vision was too dark for almost everyone involved, including Mr. Spielberg — Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz, the duo behind the ABC series “Once Upon a Time,” took over. Expected to wrap soon.
BRYAN FULLER STRIKES AGAIN!
 
Oct 25, 2017
174
There are a handful of shows I'm interested in on Apple's streaming service but not nearly enough to be worth $15 a month, even if all the ones that potentially sound okay actually turn out okay. I'll binge during a free trial.
 
Oct 29, 2017
916
Apple fans will pay whatever Apple asks, no matter how unreasonable
Apple's not bulletproof. The feedback so far from producers and directors has been less than stellar. On top of that, count on Apple to do something stupid like only make the service available on Apple TV, a random TV mfr, iOS devices, and a web browser.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,335
Cleveland, OH
Deadline has an interesting write-up about why Netflix shows are unable to find new homes after they are cancelled, and what this could mean for the freshly-cancelled "One Day at a Time." Apparently, they are trying to change up how we watch TV and have very little interest in keeping shows around after 2-3 seasons, unless it's a big breakout hit like "Stranger Things," "Grace and Frankie," "House of Cards," and "Orange is the New Black."

Deadline said:
I hear there is a standard clause in the deals for Netflix series from outside studios that prevents the shows from airing elsewhere for a significant period of time, said to be 2-3 years, making a continuation on another network/platform virtually impossible. That is probably why we haven’t seen CBS TV Studios’ comedy "American Vandal"a breakout hit for Netflix when it launched but canceled in October after two seasons — move to CBS All Access.
Deadline said:
Netflix is unabashedly data driven, with many of its decisions based on algorithms. That’s how the network reportedly switched from the initial (and traditional) 13-episode seasons to seasons of 10 episodes or less. Word is that those shorter seasons are considered optimal for consumption, and any additional episodes beyond 10 a season do not add value, so they are an unnecessary expense for the network.

The same goes for the number of seasons. If a show has not broken out in a big way during its first couple of seasons, there has been chatter Netflix does not see significant growth potential beyond Season 3 (and sometimes beyond Season 2).
Deadline said:
Netflix’s strategy to grow subscription base is focused on introducing new series all the time, sometimes multiple ones each weekend. According to industry observers, fans of some of the canceled series would be disappointed by their demise but not upset enough to drop Netflix as there is new product coming out all the time that catches their attention.
Even if a show does pretty well--like the recently cancelled Marvel shows--other things, such as salary negotiations, episode counts, and overall budget constraints, could hold them up and prevent them from getting renewed:

Deadline said:
There was some back-and-forth between Netflix and Marvel TV, including the network requesting a season-order trim from 13 to 10 episodes, before the streaming giant pulled the plug on all Marvel series that it had picked up years ago at a very high price. (There were creative issues on some shows as well.) The first Marvel series were a big draw as they were among the handful of original series on the service. Two, three seasons in, the shows didn’t get the same attention because of the huge volume of new product. Netflix has built an adequate Marvel library, which will live on the service, while the Internet company cut a major expense by canceling the superhero series to invest in new fare.
It's a pretty batty--and unfair--method of how Netflix treats its shows once they're done with them (in my opinion). It's as if they refuse to spend any more money on them, but at the same time won't let any other streaming network have it.

Their desire of limiting shows to just a few seasons can be both good and bad, seeing how often shows tend to go way past their sell-by date ("Modern Family," "The Big Bang Theory," and "The Office" are a few shows that many people complain should've ended years before they actually did), but at the same time, why tease fans and the people who make the show with the possibility of a new season if the chances are most likely against them? Just set it up as a 2-3 season show and let it have a beginning, middle, and end.
 
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RatskyWatsky

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,357
Apple's not bulletproof. The feedback so far from producers and directors has been less than stellar. On top of that, count on Apple to do something stupid like only make the service available on Apple TV, a random TV mfr, iOS devices, and a web browser.
Apple fans will still insist that it's better than Netflix
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,325
Netflix is unabashedly data driven, with many of its decisions based on algorithms. That’s how the network reportedly switched from the initial (and traditional) 13-episode seasons to seasons of 10 episodes or less. Word is that those shorter seasons are considered optimal for consumption, and any additional episodes beyond 10 a season do not add value, so they are an unnecessary expense for the network.
Netflix has learned that the complaints people have about their shows might be worth considering.
 
In a worrying sign for "Halo", a second showrunner comes on board.

Steven Kane (TNT's The Last Ship, The Closer) has boarded the live-action drama as co-showrunner. In his new role, Kane will serve alongside showrunner Kyle Killen (Lone Star, Awake).

Sources say the decision to bring in a second showrunner came directly from Killen, who wanted to focus on the big-budget drama's stateside production — including writing and producing — as he sought a partner who was able to spend the better part of a year in Budapest during physical production on Halo. Killen is expected to be on set but not full time. Showtime, in announcing the June 2018 series pickup, called Halo its "most ambitious series ever."
 

RatskyWatsky

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,357
Looks like Starz has scrubbed all traces of Counterpart from their website and app - I can't think of why they would do this unless the rights have been purchased by another company. Season three incoming?
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,359
Deadline has an interesting write-up about why Netflix shows are unable to find new homes after they are cancelled, and what this could mean for the freshly-cancelled "One Day at a Time." Apparently, they are trying to change up how we watch TV and have very little interest in keeping shows around after 2-3 seasons, unless it's a big breakout hit like "Stranger Things," "Grace and Frankie," "House of Cards," and "Orange is the New Black."
I have my problems with Netflix, but limiting shows to a few seasons is awesome and I love it. Most shows don't really need more than three seasons.
 

Cornballer

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,999
Looks like Starz has scrubbed all traces of Counterpart from their website and app - I can't think of why they would do this unless the rights have been purchased by another company. Season three incoming?
Yeah, was odd to see that posted. Wouldn't it also be strange for them to not retain streaming rights for the first couple seasons if someone else bought it?
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,335
Cleveland, OH
I have my problems with Netflix, but limiting shows to a few seasons is awesome and I love it. Most shows don't really need more than three seasons.
My boyfriend says that all the time too, and ever since he first started saying it, it's like my eyes have been opened to how many shows are so good because they're only 3 seasons long ("Happy Endings," "Arrested Development" before it was revived, and now "One Day at a Time" come to mind) or start to get bad shortly after.
 
Oct 29, 2017
916
My boyfriend says that all the time too, and ever since he first started saying it, it's like my eyes have been opened to how many shows are so good because they're only 3 seasons long ("Happy Endings," "Arrested Development" before it was revived, and now "One Day at a Time" come to mind) or start to get bad shortly after.
Kinda how I felt after Travelers. Like, yeah, it could have gone on for 10 more years with a "what mission are they on this week?!" format, but the way it ended after three seasons made it more satisfying.
 

RatskyWatsky

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,357
I have my problems with Netflix, but limiting shows to a few seasons is awesome and I love it. Most shows don't really need more than three seasons.
The problem is that Netflix seems to be limiting shows to a few seasons without actually telling the creators of the shows so they can plan accordingly, which is shitty.

Yeah, was odd to see that posted. Wouldn't it also be strange for them to not retain streaming rights for the first couple seasons if someone else bought it?
Maybe they're having a temporary dispute with the production company (or maybe someone bought the streaming rights from them...)
 
Oct 25, 2017
859
I have my problems with Netflix, but limiting shows to a few seasons is awesome and I love it. Most shows don't really need more than three seasons.
And if they announced that and let the writers wrap it up that would be ok but dangling the renewal carrot in front of cast, crew and fans and then pulling the plug is kinda shitty.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,390
It's a race between the music streaming services to figure out who can spend the least on actual music artists by funneling subscription fees to video projects!

--

NYT had a piece yesterday on Apple's first slate of programming.
I'm still 50/50 on See happening. I've heard it's a total clusterfuck and Tim Cook doesn't like it at all. But they've already invested so much in it, I wonder if it will air or they will sell it some other outlet, or what.

Not really worrying. It says exactly why in that blurb. Killen doesn't want to spend a year in Budapest. Lots of shows do the co-showrunner thing for this reason.