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2019 Bolivian election, Evo Morales resigns after massive protest

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Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
EDIT.- Final results added (source for results)

EDIT.- Results invalidated, new elections called (see OAS preliminary report)

So, with all the talks recently about Latin American issues and politics in Era, I thought we should have a general thread to talk about the 2019 General elections in Bolivia, which are happening today, Sunday October 20th.

Context

Bolivia has a presidentialist democratic system, in which a President and Vice-President are elected once every five years. Bolivia's democracy has been quite fragile across the 20th century with multiple military dictatorships (many of them backed by the US in the context of the Cold War). Since the 1990s, Bolivia had had a multi-party system (called in Bolivian context, sistema pluripartidista), in which during the 90s and 2000s parties of all political leanings ended up forming huge across-the-board coalitions in order to form stable governments.

In 2005, Movimiento al Socialismo's (Movement towards Socialism) Evo Morales won the general elections, becoming the country's first indigenous president. In a country where close to 60% of the population is of American indigenous descent but the political and economical power had been historically in the hands of a small white and mestizo minority, the rise of Morales into politics seemed like the turn of a new time in Bolivian politics, and it certainly has been in a way.

Morales' administrations have been controversial in many ways. Aligned with figures such as the late Hugo Chávez and Fidel Castro, Morales has claim to lead Bolivarian socialism into the country, although in reality save some nationalisations during his first administration, most of his governments have been moderate in nature. His time has coincided with that of an economic boom for Bolivia, which many claim that the president has not known how to take advantage of. Claims of rampant corruption and a megalomaniac personality (like his other Bolivarian counterparts) have become common during his now multiple administrations. That being said, poverty has definitely decreased and a new middle class has emerged, in what we can call a time of economic prosperity for Bolivia. Poverty has decreased and literacy has increased in rural regions. Some are critical of the increasing cult of personality being pushed by the government, with him having the nickname of el hermano Evo ("brother Evo").

Bolivian constitution allows only for 2 consecutive terms, so a nation-wide referendum took place in 2016 to decide whether or not this term limit should be abolished. The referendum, proposed and pushed by the ruling party, had the obvious objective of allowing Morales to stay in power. His entire political party has been built around him, and no successor has been named or even proposed. The 'No' option won with a 51.3% of support, thwarting Morales' hopes of re-election.

Morales challenged the results and the country's Constitutional Court - largely controlled by judges supporting Morales - ruled that Evo Morales could run for president indefinitely.

So here we are today.

The big four
(according to polls)

Movimiento al Socialismo-Instrumento Político para la Soberanía de los Pueblos (MAS-IPSP)
Movement towards Socialism - Political Instrument for Peoples' Sovereignty



Tagline: Futuro Seguro (Safe future)

Candidate: Evo Morales (1959), syndicalist - looking for a third term after invalidating the 2006 referendum results.
Political leaning: Left / Bolivarian socialism / populism

Results: 43.8% - likely going to second round

Difficult to define, party is self-defined as leftist, but its policies and ideologies end up being unpredictable. Originally Marxist-Leninist, has evolved into a moderate variant of Bolivarian socialism. Morales has had controversial statements about LGTB and women (claiming the hormones in chicken creates homosexuals, and making plentiful of ignorant sexist commentaries about women), but his administration helped establish the law of Gender Identity which allows Trans people to get new IDs matching their gender. Claimed 'not to understand gay people, but respects them'. Claimed that 'abortion is a crime', but his party proposed make abortion free and universal.

Comunidad Ciudadana (C)
Coalition of: Frente Revolucionario de Izquierda (Revolutionary Leftist Front) and Soberanía y Libertad (Sovereignty and Freedom)
Citizen's Community



Tagline: Ya es demasiado (Too much already)

Candidate: Carlos Mesa Gisbert (1953), historian, journalist and ex-president of Bolivia (2003-2005)
Political leaning: Centrism, economic liberalism

Results: 38.2% - likely going to second round

Mesa was vice-president and president (2003-2005) in the past and is a reknown Bolivian historian. A centrist, basically right in the middle out of every political position you can come up with, it's like he does not want to upset anyone. One of the few parties that mentions gender equality in its program, declares himself 'respectful' of LGTB people but takes no position as to whether or not they should get more rights (like marriage). No opinion on abortion either. Secularism.

Demócratas: Bolivia dice No
Democrats: Bolivia says No



Tagline: Las Manos Limpias / Bolivia dice No (Clean Hands / Bolivia says No)

Candidate: Óscar Ortiz Antelo (1969), businessman and national senator
Political leaning: Liberalism, federalism

Results: 4.4%

Coming from a well-off eastern Bolivian family, Ortiz has always been in close relationship with the eastern Bolivia business people. Serving an old demand from his home region of Santa Cruz, proposes to devolve powers to the Bolivian departments, true federalism in the future. Religious, pro-business, low taxes, want energetic self-reliance, anti-LGTB, as a senator voted against the Gender Identity bill (which gave rights to trans people), anti-abortion, marriage only between man and woman.

Partido Demócrata-Cristiano (PDC)
Christian-Democratic Party



Tagline: Chi Puede (Chi can [do it])

Candidate: Chi Hyun Chung (1970), university professor, evangelical pastor, born in South Korea
Political leaning: Conservative, Christian traditionalism

Results: 8.6% - big suprise, becomes the country's third political force

Self-defined as a 'Christian capitalist', claims he will rule Bolivia by following the Bible. Decided to run because he saw 'Bolivia becoming communist'. A surprise evangelist in a mostly Catholic country. Supports federalism and self-rule for indigenous peoples. Anti-LGTB, proposes psychiatric therapies for them. Pro small-businesses.

Others:

Felix Patzi (Movimiento Tercer Sistema / Third System Movement), excision of MAS-IPSP. Patzi is an indigenous Aymara. Pro-indigenous rights, extremely sexist (believes violence against women was caused by them getting into the workforce, proposes they should either stay at home or accompany their husbands at their jobs), anti-LGTB, pro-family. Results: 1.1%

Victor Hugo Cárdenas (Unidad Cívica Solidaridad / Civic Union Solidarity), also evangelist, and indigenous Aymara with a long public trajectory. Overall conservative, against LGTB marriage or adoption, anti-abortion. Want to arm women so they can defend themselves against men. Results: 0.5%

Others: 1.1%

Honorary mention:

Partido de Acción Nacionalista - Bolivia (PAN-BOL)

Party of Nationalist Action - Bolivia



And I say honorary because she is polling low, but she is the only woman candidate and has interesting things to say.

Tagline: Pan Para Bolivia (Pan for Bolivia, playing with the word 'pan' - the initials of her party but also 'bread' in Spanish)

Results: 0.7%

Candidate:
Ruth Nina Juchani (1972), lawyer and syndicalist, before that she owned a small business and was a taxi driver
Political leaning: Left, social progressivism

The only woman candidate and also of indigenous ancestry. Nina has been involved in politics for over a decade, being a national senator. Against discrimination of LGTB people, proposes a national debate on the issue of adoption. Wants to tackle the issues of violence against women and children living in the streets by creating new ministries dedicated exclusively to that. Pro-abortion. Her priorities: women rights and justice.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
Polls

Well, elections are happening now as we speak and the polling was limited to the end of last week, if I'm not wrong. In a few hours we should be getting the first results right from the electoral sites.


Voting intention according to Unitel (source: Víaciencia)


Source (includes break down by regions)

Thus far, high participation reported by the Plurinational Electoral Body:


Will be updated as things happen.

My opinion

As some of you may know (or not), I'm only half Bolivian, and I haven't been living in the country for over a decade. My position in Bolivian politics has always been quite pesimistic, and despite being a leftist, I personally do not support Evo Morales. His party, and particularly those close to him, are encroaching the political institutions, and after close to 15 years in power, many probably believe that they're set for life. I would personally not mind if the party (MAS-IPSP) kept winning elections, but the decision of keeping Morales around no matter what, challening and igorning the results of democratic referendums, everything so he can keep running, that is what I do not like.

He is creating a cult of personality that I do not like (putting his face permanently in any new infrastructure, etc.) and I believe Bolivian democracy is fragile enough that perpetuating someone like this could end up in years and years of the same person in government, a Venezuela like scenario.

The candidates... I am not a fan of any. That's the issue of Bolivian politics, there's never been a solid alternative and the opposition is in shambles. The old political guard (pre-Morales) has only now realised they don't stand a chance anymore, but they refuse to stop trying. Mesa is the only viable alternative, but he seems incapable of having an opinion on social issues. LGTB: cannot say. Abotion: cannot say. It gets tiring.

Anyway, I'll be following this elections closely, but as likely as not, we will be seeing Evo Morales' third (fourth in reality) mandate starting soon.
 
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Results
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
Preliminary results

According to newspaper 'Página Siete', more info as it comes. It is a conteo rápido, meaning that full results are still unknown due to vote counting being slower in rural areas. Results may still change, there's an increasing possibility of second-round.



Seems like, for the first time in 15 years, there will need to be a second round between Evo Morales (MAS-IPSP) and Carlos Mesa (C). Other candidates Oscar Ortiz and Chi Hyun Chung have asked their supporters to vote for Mesa in the event a second round is finally confirmed by the electoral body.

There are also complaints about some irregularities taking place, the vote counting mysteriously stopped at around 20:00, not to be resumed until hours later, people took the streets and gathered around polling places.

The results were very divided regionally, with the west (Andean region plus Pando) supporting Morales and the East (Valleys and lowlands) supporting Mesa:

 
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Menx64

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,122
So Evo Stole the election and Bolivia is going to be literally on fire tonight???

Latinoamerica is a a huge boiling pot at this time. I expect Honduras to be the next one given that his president is a narco.
Hoping for the best in Latam.
 

ChippyTurtle

Member
Oct 13, 2018
901
OAS submitted this. I know OAS is right-wing these days but it sounds bad. Good luck to Bolivia.

Statement of the OAS Electoral Observation Mission in Bolivia
October 21, 2019



The Electoral Observation Mission of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Bolivia calls for respect for the will of the citizenry:

This electoral process has taken place in very complex conditions. During this electoral observation, the OAS Electoral Observation Mission has witnessed the obvious inequality between the candidates. The use of public resources during the campaign has been evident.

Despite these conditions, citizens participated in great numbers in a peaceful, and orderly manner on Sunday, October 20. It is essential that the will of the citizens be fully respected, honoring the values contained in the Inter-American Democratic Charter of the OAS.

The OAS Mission expresses its deep concern and surprise at the drastic and hard-to-explain change in the trend of the preliminary results revealed after the closing of the polls.

At 19:40 on Sunday, October 20, the TSE disseminated the results of the TREP. These figures clearly indicated a second round, a trend that coincided with the only authorized quick count and the statistical exercise of the Mission. Our information was shared today with the TSE and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

At 20:10, the TSE stopped disclosing preliminary results, by decision of the plenary, with more than 80% of the votes counted. 24 hours later, the TSE presented data with an inexplicable change in trend that drastically modifies the fate of the election and generates a loss of confidence in the electoral process.

At an appropriate time, the Mission will issue a report with recommendations ahead of a second round.

We urge the electoral authority to firmly defend the will of the Bolivian citizenry in strict adherence with the Constitution and its complementary laws in an agile and transparent manner.

It is extremely important that calm is maintained and any form of violence is avoided in this delicate situation, so that departmental calculations are carried out normally and without interruptions and with guarantees for our observers and the electoral staff.

We hope that the result of the final calculation will adhere to the will of the voters expressed at the polls.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

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Oct 27, 2017
1,040
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So things are heating up at the moment: some government buildings have been set on fire, people have taken up the streets and some regions have called for general strikes until the situation clears up

Let me try summarise what's happened:

October 20th:

Election day in Bolivia, polls indicate ever-closing race between Evo Morales (MAS-IPSP) and Carlos Mesa (C).

The voting places started closing up at around 18:00 local time as indicated by the electoral law (Source) Vote counting started immediately thereafter.

The flow of partial results was fluid from 18:00, with the results showing a very close race between Morales and Mesa. Bolivia has a two-round system, the only way to avoid a second round is if there is a difference greater than 10 percentage points between the most voted candidate and the second. The results at the time pointed at a second round.

At 20:10 local time, the TSE (Supreme Electoral Tribunal), with 80% of the votes already counted, stops updating the results, giving no reason whatsoever. (Source)

24 hours pass without the final results being known.

October 21st

People take up the streets and set up vigils in front of the electoral buildings, many take it upon themselves to guard the buildings in case something out of order happens. (Source)

Almost 24 hours later, the TSE resumes updating the results... showing a drastic change in the voting trend, favouring Evo Morales, who know beats Mesa in just barely more than 10 points, becoming the winner and removing any need for a second round. The OAS - who has international observers -- calls the event 'worrying' and requests an extraordinary meeting (Source)

People, enraged with the apparent fraud in the results, start rioting and some government buildings are set afire:


Source

Then there's a quick sucession of events, the sources are all in Spanish, sorry about that:

Member of the regional TSE quits

Suitcases full of marked ballots are found - they were all fraudulent and were intended to be used as votes in favour of Morales:


Second largest city announces indefinite strike

Riot police clashes with manifestants in various cities

Several government buildings set afire

More clashes expected (source in English)

Police abuse:


Regional headquarters of MAS-IPSP attacked and sacked:


Amidst the rioting and chaos, a statue of Hugo Chávez is torn down:


This is currently ongoing.
 
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Tochtli79

Member
Jun 27, 2019
655
Mexico City
Fuck corruption from the left as well as the right. Bolivia and Venezuela are prime examples that leftists can become just as power hungry and disgusting as any alt right politician. When will Latin America be able to free itself from the grip of shitty politicians?

I'm not knowledgeable about Bolivia's electoral process but I saw some comments saying Evo Morales wasn't even constitutionally eligible for re-election this time, is that right?
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
Fuck corruption from the left as well as the right. Bolivia and Venezuela are prime examples that leftists can become just as power hungry and disgusting as any alt right politician. When will Latin America be able to free itself from the grip of shitty politicians?

I'm not knowledgeable about Bolivia's electoral process but I saw some comments saying Evo Morales wasn't even constitutionally eligible for re-election this time, is that right?
Correct. The Bolivian constitution establishes a 2-term limit (sucessive). In 2016 there was a binding nation-wide referendum that asked a single question: whether or not the 2-term limit should be abolished. People voted 'no'. Morales however challenged the results to the Constitutional Court, which (to the astonishment of everyone) ruled that disallowing him to run again would 'go against his human rights'. So basically the results of the referendum were discarded.

In fact, Morales has been president for three consecutive terms already, should he be elected again it'll be the fourth. He was first elected in 2005 and served his first term until 2010, when a brand new constitution was put into place. This was considered to 'reset' his mandate (many people criticised this when it first happened), so what technically was his second term (2010-2015) was counted as the first. The current is his second/thid mandate (2015-2020).
 

jett

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
19,893
The most shameless shit. Latin America really is a massive shitshow right now.
Evo is a dumb motherfucker, why ruin it all in the end by cheating

If he loses power all of his corruptions will come to light. And nobody will be protect him and cronies.
Correct. The Bolivian constitution establishes a 2-term limit (sucessive). In 2016 there was a binding nation-wide referendum that asked a single question: whether or not the 2-term limit should be abolished. People voted 'no'. Morales however challenged the results to the Constitutional Court, which (to the astonishment of everyone) ruled that disallowing him to run again would 'go against his human rights'. So basically the results of the referendum were discarded.

In fact, Morales has been president for three consecutive terms already, should he be elected again it'll be the fourth. He was first elected in 2005 and served his first term until 2010, when a brand new constitution was put into place. This was considered to 'reset' his mandate (many people criticised this when it first happened), so what technically was his second term (2010-2015) was counted as the first. The current is his second/thid mandate (2015-2020).
The ol' Fujimori strategy (who coincidentally also cheated his way into his final term). Maybe he'll end him like him in the near future. Hopefully.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
October 23rd

Evo Morales accuses the political opposition to be trying to conduct a coup d'etat against him, and during a speech declared 'state of emergency', although no official declaration has been announced by the government as of yet.


Some international media misinterpreted and took this message as an official declaration of emergency, but it hasn't happened yet.

The OAS is currently on an extraordinary council meeting to discuss the developments in the country:


In the meantime, demonstration and conflicts are still happening in the largest cities:


Tomasa Yarhui is an indigenous leader and former Minister of State.

Citizen and regional platforms as well as political leaders suggest an indefinite strike and constant mobilisiation to show opposition to electoral fraud:

 

Serpens007

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,136
Untzillatx I am reading that Police is actually going for the coup, do you know anything about that?

I was wondering yesterday about this, was there any international overseeing over the elections ?
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
Untzillatx I am reading that Police is actually going for the coup, do you know anything about that?

I was wondering yesterday about this, was there any international overseeing over the elections ?
Calling it a coup is a stretch. Everything points to the elections having been fraudulent, so much so that social sectors that in the last decade overwhelmingly supported Morales (namely the Andean indigenous peoples) have splintered into supporters and detractors.

Stuff has escalated immensely since the last update: three people dead, hundreds hurt, and thousands mobilised for one side or the other. There have been confrontations in the streets of La Paz basically every night now for over a week, government buildings have been set afire, or vandalised or taken by protesters. The city of Santa Cruz (largest in Bolivia) has been living an indefinite strike with constant road blockades for over a week. There are claims from both sides accusing each other of paying people to protest.

The original demand was to conduct a second round between Morales and Mesa, the demands have moved now into a full annulment of the elections. The Constitution does in fact state that in case of proved fraud, new elections need to be called and the guilty political party dissolved and their leaders charged. That seems unlikely.

The latest (as of the last couple of hours) is that apparently police officers in Cochabamba (fourth largest city) are in mutiny. The government has a firm grip on the military (decisive for holding power), but things look dire. It would not be the first time the police and the army fight each other (last time was in 2003, the so-called 'Black February', where there was an urban battle between police and military police using live ammunition).

Things are very tense at the moment, with demonstrations taking place all across the country.

Yes, there was an international overseeing, the OAS. They did speak up as soon as the apparent fraud was taking place and they are now conducting an electoral audit.

EDIT.- The police mutiny has just expanded to at least three other cities, the police officers in Santa Cruz have just confirmed mutiny. Protesters are gathering in front of the regional police headquarters across Bolivia demanding the police forces to join them. Crazy.
 
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Serpens007

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,136
Calling it a coup is a stretch. Everything points to the elections having been fraudulent, so much so that social sectors that in the last decade overwhelmingly supported Morales (namely the Andean indigenous peoples) have splintered into supporters and detractors.

Stuff has escalated immensely since the last update: three people dead, hundreds hurt, and thousands mobilised for one side or the other. There have been confrontations in the streets of La Paz basically every night now for over a week, government buildings have been set afire, or vandalised or taken by protesters. The city of Santa Cruz (largest in Bolivia) has been living an indefinite strike with constant road blockades for over a week. There are claims from both sides accusing each other of paying people to protest.

The original demand was to conduct a second round between Morales and Mesa, the demands have moved now into a full annulment of the elections. The Constitution does in fact state that in case of proved fraud, new elections need to be called and the guilty political party dissolved and their leaders charged. That seems unlikely.

The latest (as of the last couple of hours) is that apparently police officers in Cochabamba (fourth largest city) are in mutiny. The government has a firm grip on the military (decisive for holding power), but things look dire. It would not be the first time the police and the army fight each other (last time was in 2003, the so-called 'Black February', where there was an urban battle between police and military police using live ammunition).

Things are very tense at the moment, with demonstrations taking place all across the country.

Yes, there was an international overseeing, the OAS. They did speak up as soon as the apparent fraud was taking place and they are now conducting an electoral audit.
Shit, I hope it doesn't get worse. One of the biggest mistakes of the left in Latin America is being unable to create new faces. Staying in power is never a good sign, even if the government is good enough.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

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Oct 27, 2017
1,040
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Shit, I hope it doesn't get worse. One of the biggest mistakes of the left in Latin America is being unable to create new faces. Staying in power is never a good sign, even if the government is good enough.
Precisely. It is the caudillo problem. The party becomes one person. The problem is that eventually, it becomes less about ideology and more about keeping the same group of people in power. They have no replacements within the party because they don't want to be replaced.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
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As of 8:46PM (local time), the regional sections of the national police of four out of nine departments have declared themselves in mutiny. This may be the beginning of the end. If the government cannot control the police, they have two options, either quit and call for elections or militarise.

Source
 

Serpens007

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,136
As of 8:46PM (local time), the regional sections of the national police of four out of nine departments have declared themselves in mutiny. This may be the beginning of the end. If the government cannot control the police, they have two options, either quit and call for elections or militarise.

Source

Fuck.

I don't think he's going to call for elections, but I hope he listens.
 

Madison

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
6,466
Lima, Peru
Evo couldnt lose cleanly, could he

He couldnt finish his time in office like a democratic leader. Even Correa knew when to stop running for office.
 

Hu3

Member
Oct 25, 2017
989
The entirety of South America is transitioning. And I believe is for the better, the only problem with all of this is the lost of life which is sad.
 

IzzyRX

Avenger
Oct 28, 2017
3,625

Serpens007

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,136
Yeah, it could go really well or not.

I don't think Brazil and Chile are in a better place right now, but yeah, looking foward to see what comes out of it.
Being from chile, I wouldn't say we are in a worse place. I mean social unrest sucks, we are tense, every day fights, but for the first time in ages, most of Chile is united against oppression and wants to set it's own rules of living. We are afraid but hopeful.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

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Oct 27, 2017
1,040
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Some news.

Police in mutinity, as of the morning of November 9th, the regional garrisons of the national police of 7 out of 9 departments (Bolivian main territorial division) are in mutiny. It all started yesterday with the rebellion of Cochabamba's UTOP (Tactical Unit of Special Operations) and the rest fell like domino pieces. The only garrisons that have not declared mutiny are that of La Paz (seat of government) and Pando.

According to some newspapers, the cause of the Cochabamba mutiny was discontent with the regional police commander, who voiced support for the violent movements in favour of Evo Morales.

Moment when the Santa Cruz garrison announced the mutiny to the public:


The Minister of Government spoke to the country yesterday evening, requesting the opening of a dialogue with the police and rejecting the possibility of mobilising the armed forces. He says they want to avoid a 'February' (refering to 2003 Black February, where a police muntiny led to open confrontation between armed foces and the police, a preamble to the overthrow of the right-wing government that paved the way to Morales' first victory).

Evo Morales has named the entire event as a coup d'etat and has announced they will ask for the support of the international community:


« I summon our people to peacefully take care of democracy and the political constitution to preserve peace and life as supreme goods above any political interest. The unity of the people will be the guarantee of the wellbeing of the Homeland and social peace. »

« Brothers and sisters, our democracy is at risk due to the coup d'Etat that violents groups against the constitutional order have put in motion. We denounced in front of the international community this attack against the order of law. »

It's interesting to notice that the administration reaction to all these events has been extremely mild, mostly because they do not need to act themselves, but rather there are reports of miners and peasants being coerced into violent, public demonstrations in support of the government (otherwise facing fines or the stoning of their properties, a tactic commonly used in the past to mobilise people in impoverished rural areas).

EDIT.- Police officers of La Paz seem to have joined the mutiny.
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

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Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
So today a bunch of things happened.

> Civic delegations of two departments ambushed as they were traveling to La Paz. The civil delegations of Potosi and Chuquisaca departments were traveling to La Paz in a bunch of coach buses to participate in the upcoming demonstrations when they were ambushed in the road by MAS supporters, the buses and people were stoned and some were taken hostage. They were later rescued by the police, and told they were beat up, women undressed and lashed and forced to record videos claiming they were being paid by the opposition to participate.

The ambush involved throwing gas granades to the buses:


There are videos of beat up people telling what's happened to them, but I will not post them as they include sensitive imagery.

People traveling were mostly university students and civic leaders. There are reports of women being raped and some missing.

> The governor of Potosi and the Mayor of Sucre (capital city), both from the ruling party, have resigned. There are reports of government buildings being set afire in some cities.

> Evo Morales calls for dialogue, wants the leaders of the four largest parties to sit down and talk about how to pacify the country, keeps talking about an ongoing coup d'etat. Has announced that he will not resign and will not involve the armed forces. During his press conference, he did not mention the civic organisations across the country that are the main organisers of the demonstrations and protests, nor did he invite the leaders to dialogue, he explicitely said he wanted to speak with the leaders of the 'four' largest parties.

Carlos Mesa has already declined any negotiation and has demanded Morales to resign and call for elections:


> Social organisations supporting Evo Morales have demanded the civic organisations and leaders from other departments (namely Santa Cruz and Potosí) leave the city of La Paz 'immediately' or be responsible of 'whatever happens next'. These social organisations are FEJUVE (Federation of Neighbour Councils) and CSUTCB (Single Confederation of Peasant Workers of Bolivia), which have historically sided with MAS.
 
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Linkark07

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,386
Reading some news about Bolivia, it seems that Morales days as president are numbered. Or am I wrong?
 
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

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Oct 27, 2017
1,040
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What if they say Evo didn't commit fraud?
Some opposition and civic leaders have expressed their doubts regarding the audit, as many fear it may not be as impartial as it is intending to be and the Bolivian government may use it as a distraction. The government has announced they will call for a second round if the final results change due to the audit, but many are past this point by now: they are demanding the anullment of the results and the calling of new elections without Evo Morales as a candidate, as dictated by the Constitution that marks a 2-term limit and by the 2006 referendum results that Morales decided to ignore.
 

JCG

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,044
Even if there was no fraud, why does the same man need to run for president again and again? That's not a good sign.
 

Rushersauce

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,109
Man, what a shitshow... Morales should fucking retire.

Untzillatx it seems the only alternative to Morales is Carlos... Because Demócratas y Demócratas Cristianos seem like a bunch of cunts (pardon my language).
 

Serpens007

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,136
It was still illegal for him to run after the people said so in a referendum
Even if there was no fraud, why does the same man need to run for president again and again? That's not a good sign.
We agree, I don't think he should have done it. Two terms is already too much.

That would prove to everyone that the OAS is a shitty organization that needs to disappear. Fuck the OAS.
It is, but if they have a bias I'd say it's pretty against Evo. I mean, they quickly acted against Morales (left wing), but they haven't done jack shit for the situation in Chile (right wing)

Some opposition and civic leaders have expressed their doubts regarding the audit, as many fear it may not be as impartial as it is intending to be and the Bolivian government may use it as a distraction. The government has announced they will call for a second round if the final results change due to the audit, but many are past this point by now: they are demanding the anullment of the results and the calling of new elections without Evo Morales as a candidate, as dictated by the Constitution that marks a 2-term limit and by the 2006 referendum results that Morales decided to ignore.
So they may be past the point of no return then. Sad to see.

Who could be a good President for Bolivia? I recall that approval ratings of Morales were good in the rural areas, while bad in the cities, but I don't know how trustful they are
 

Menx64

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,122
Holy shit show is Latam. Damn Evo thinks Bolivia can only be ok with him at its elm. Their ego is only smaller than their own stupidity.
 
OAS preliminary report New
OP
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Untzillatx

Untzillatx

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,040
Basque Country
Luis Almagro, secretary general of the OAS has announced the release of the preliminary results:


They have been made available - I believe so far only in Spanish - in the OAS website: Press release and preliminary results

Main findings:

  • In the four analysed elements (technology, chain of custody, electoral records and statistical projections) irregularities have been found, that range from very serious to indicative. In consequence, the audit team questions the integrity of the results.
  • Regarding the technology aspect, very serious security flaws were found in the TREP (Transmission of Preliminary Electoral Results) system as well as in the final counting. In addition, a manipulation of the TREP system has been registered that affected both the preliminary and final results.
  • These manipulations to the electronic system are of such magnitude, that they should be seriously investigated by the Bolivian state so to find the individuals or organisations that are responsible.
  • Non-electronic records with alterations and falsified signatures have been found.

Preliminary conclusion: Based on the statistical projections and the initial voting trend, it seems likely that Evo Morales received the most votes, followed by Carlos Mesa. However, in the opinion of the audit, it is statistically improbable that Morales had managed to get 10 percentage points of different in respect to Mesa (required to avoid a second round). Based on the irregularities found, the OAS audit team cannot validate the results of the October 20th election and recommends beginning a new electoral process.

The report also comments that the OAS will continue to investigate more than 250 complaints they have received during the past days regarding irregularities in the electoral process. Final report will be published in the coming days.

TL;DR Irregularities found in both the digital and physical voting and vote counting systems. OAS cannot validate the results, recommends new elections.

---

This is now an interesting result. On one hand because Morales did publicly announce that they would uphold the findings of the OAS. Now, the report points to irregularities, but it remains to be seen who the culprit is. The Bolivian constitution establishes that, in case of proven electoral fraud, a new electoral committee needs to be organised -the former members subject to a legal process- and any political party directly involved should be automatically dissolved, the leaders or responsibles charged with electoral fraud.

In most other cases I would be dubious of the OAS, especially in regards to a leftist Latin American government, but the fraud was not only evident, but also sloppy.

For those who may not know, it went like this:

* Polling previous to the election showed it to be a close race between Evo Morales (MAS-IPSP) and Carlos Mesa (CC)
* On the election day, preliminary results after the closing of the voting stations showed a victory for Morales but with less than 10 percetage points in respect to Mesa, which meant a second round would be needed (Morales has never faced a second round).
* At around 22:00 local time, the transmission of preliminary results was interrupted when they were at 80%. Explanations were not given other than 'the Internet connection is slow'.
* The transmission of preliminary results did not resume until the evening of October 21st, almost 24 hours later. These results suddenly reversed the trend followed by the previous 80%, suddenly giving a big advantage of Morales.
* In the end, according to the 'final' results, a second round was not needed, people claimed fraud, and here we are today.

EDIT.- Evo Morales calls for new elections and the renovation of the electoral committee
 
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Rushersauce

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,109
What's the strawman? This is hardly my original thought. Other people have previously pointed out that we have people here who stan for Xi, Maduro, Putin, Modi, and even Agent Orange. If that member ain't being sarcastic, they're following in the grand resetera tradition.
Lmao, right. Resetera, the fanpage of authoritatians.

Here, this is your emoji 🤡
 

CyclonatorZ

Member
Sep 28, 2019
136
Lmao, right. Resetera, the fanpage of authoritatians.

Here, this is your emoji 🤡
You do realize I'm talking about a small subset of the member base here, right? Most people here are decent folk, far as I can tell. Doesn't make it any less disturbing that, in every single thread about some authoritarian fucker doing nasty shit somewhere in the world, there's usually at least one person here jumping to their defense. Is why I was concerned about that other post, is all.

Regardless, you've made it more than clear that you're not interested in reasonably debating my points, so I'm done. You're officially the first person here going on my ignore list. Bye.
 

Rushersauce

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,109
You do realize I'm talking about a small subset of the member base here, right? Most people here are decent folk, far as I can tell. Doesn't make it any less disturbing that, in every single thread about some authoritarian fucker doing nasty shit somewhere in the world, there's usually at least one person here jumping to their defense. Is why I was concerned about that other post, is all.

Regardless, you've made it more than clear that you're not interested in reasonably debating my points, so I'm done. You're officially the first person here going on my ignore list. Bye.
There are people like that everywhere. Lumping all of us with them because you saw some fucks aligning with dictators (which, btw, they always get banned) doesn't mean ERA is always staning for authoritarians.

But, deflect it. Show me those authoritarians fans that haven't been banned, I'll wait. Oh wait, you can't, because they are all banned.
 
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