After shooting his father in the back, 11 year old tells investigators there will be a part 2 if he doesn’t get a PlayStation, Xbox and a PC

Z-Beat

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,060
He concocted a plan to steal a gun from his dad, and when to shoot him, but not how to get the stuff he demanded afterwards. Did he think the cops were just gonna let him go home after he shot one person and threatened to do it again? There's a step missing from this plan.
 

Tigress

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,091
Washington
is it too late to put up that kid for adoption?
That's irresponsible. You're just passing the problem on to some one else who probably can't handle it either. Kid needs to be put in a psychiatric hospital. Particularly one specializing in psychopaths. Lucky for the kid they have come up with some developments on how to get psychopaths to integrate into society (it used to be a nothing can be done kind of prognosis except keep them locked away from others for the other people's safety).
 

coldzone24

Member
Oct 27, 2017
118
Cleveland, OH
It may sound easy to blame the parents here, but I don't think that is the case here. Of course I don't know what the home life is there, but torturing dogs and wanting too shoot your father in the head for pretty petty reasons sounds more like sociopathy or psychopathy. And I imagine that as a parent that would not only be hard to deal with, but also hard to accept.
 

smurfx

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,467
That's irresponsible. You're just passing the problem on to some one else who probably can't handle it either. Kid needs to be put in a psychiatric hospital. Particularly one specializing in psychopaths. Lucky for the kid they have come up with some developments on how to get psychopaths to integrate into society (it used to be a nothing can be done kind of prognosis except keep them locked away from others for the other people's safety).
why even bother joking. yeah this kid needs help because just locking him up isn't going to help matters and it will likely turn him into a real menace when he gets out.
 

Antrax

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,254
it was locked in his car.
Obviously the dad couldn't have predicted this, but a car is not a gun safe, the only secure way of storing firearms. I remember when my best friend growing up starting getting hunting rifles (common in MS), and his parents mandated that he had to save up for a gun safe first, that only they had the combination for. That's how you lock up guns.

Locking it in the car is dumb since a kid probably learns about car keys when they're like 5.
 

Mr Jones

Member
Oct 25, 2017
778
Kid missed out on a few ass whoopings
That probably wouldn't help. Sometimes physical punishment produces worse effects - like its a challenge. Ever see a kid get whooped, yet they don't cry, they just snarl at you? Yeah. That can happen.

I have an autistic child, and my kid went to school with a child that I feel is very similar to this kid. His mother took away his tablet because he was doing something that he shouldn't be doing. He got a mug, filled it with water and put it in the microwave until it was boiling, went into the living room, and threw it at her. It thankfully only hit her in the chest - she would have been fucked if it hit her face. When his dad came downstairs after hearing her screaming, he told the dad that she hurt him, so he was going to hurt her more. He was 9 at the time.

His parents aren't assholes. They went through all sorts of financial hoops to get their kid into a center for children with developmental needs. They don't physically punish their child - that doesn't work. They try to raise a kid that I wouldn't be able to handle.

This cop is in over his head. He is going to need some really skilled therapists to help with his son. Otherwise he's raising a criminal.
 

excelsiorlef

Member
Oct 25, 2017
37,425
Obviously the dad couldn't have predicted this, but a car is not a gun safe, the only secure way of storing firearms. I remember when my best friend growing up starting getting hunting rifles (common in MS), and his parents mandated that he had to save up for a gun safe first, that only they had the combination for. That's how you lock up guns.

Locking it in the car is dumb since a kid probably learns about car keys when they're like 5.
Sure absolutely but it's still something.

Not like it was in his closet.
 

srsly?

Member
Feb 24, 2018
2,485
My psycho older brother threatened to cut me and my parents up into little pieces with a butcher knife countless times. Fortunately, he only ever carried through on his violent threats with his fists.
 

Verelios

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,949
That kid needs some serious help, and hopefully he finds it. Sometimes, when seeing cases like this it's easy to put the blame on the parents, but that's a bad ass kid. He planned to shoot his father, made steps to do it, including searching their car three times for the gun and testing its power on their dog, and then did it. That's sociopathic behavior.
 
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Z-Beat

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,060
It may sound easy to blame the parents here, but I don't think that is the case here. Of course I don't know what the home life is there, but torturing dogs and wanting too shoot your father in the head for pretty petty reasons sounds more like sociopathy or psychopathy. And I imagine that as a parent that would not only be hard to deal with, but also hard to accept.
The other articles imply it's not great
https://www.southbendtribune.com/news/publicsafety/granger-year-old-detained-in-shooting-of-father-named-in/article_12f27712-6170-55c1-84b3-6dcf401802db.html
The 11-year-old Granger boy who is detained in the shooting of his father — an Indiana State Police officer — over the weekend, has also been named in a police report for an alleged battery of an 8-year-old.
Thursday was not the first time this month police were called to the Conover Drive address. Two officers were dispatched there Feb. 13 for a welfare check after an 11-year-old called 911. The child reportedly said he had been bad and had been struck by his mother. No report was filed by officers.
If that 2nd one is true then his parents have some culpability in how insane he is.
 

tommy7154

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,565
Tested it on the dog first?

What do you do with this kid? He's going to be a serial killer if he's able.
 

Cas

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,391
Don't be so quick to condemn the parents. I've seen kids like this at pediatric psychiatric wards. Many times they are just born without the ability to empathize. There is a test done to measure empathy and appropriate social reactions. Kids like this score in the sub 1% on emotional intelligence and empathy.

There is no cure, but therapy and medication helps. These kids can learn how to practice what empathy is over time.
 

coldzone24

Member
Oct 27, 2017
118
Cleveland, OH
Oh that's not good to hear. While it's possible that those stories may have been made up, especially if it was the kid who reported it since lying like that would fall in line with the everything else, it sounds more like a combination of mental illness and bad home life/woefully ill-equipped parents.
 

Ogodei

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
7,370
North Jackson High
The father kept his gun locked in his police cruiser precisely to avoid this kind of problem. Typically gun violence in the home is because of that irresponsibility (of having accessible guns in your home or having them at home at all), but in this case it sounds like the father was doing what he should and the kid was just that determined.

Here the dad seemed to have a full understanding of what gun ownership means, which shouldn't be commended, but common sense is uncommon on guns.
 

Atisha

Member
Nov 28, 2017
967
With young males in particular, before they act out in violence, they are very often long suffering victims of abuse themselves.
 

Embedded

Member
Oct 27, 2017
174
Sounds scary to have child like that.

I really don't know how i would handle it. At his age i had an incident where police was involved and i knew that i had to think before i speak because you can't just say whatever you want in front of those people even though i was the victim.

Who should society try to protect in this situation? The kid or the possible future victims?
 

Nephtis

Banned
Dec 27, 2017
679
Amazing seeing some people here victim blaming the parent that got shot.

The kid doesn't need incarceration, he needs help and needs to be constantly watched. The parents are no longer in a place where they can do this on their own.
 
Jan 18, 2018
407
The father kept his gun locked in his police cruiser precisely to avoid this kind of problem. Typically gun violence in the home is because of that irresponsibility (of having accessible guns in your home or having them at home at all), but in this case it sounds like the father was doing what he should and the kid was just that determined.

Here the dad seemed to have a full understanding of what gun ownership means, which shouldn't be commended, but common sense is uncommon on guns.
Except the park where you keep in a safe or lock your car keys away at least.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,434
User Banned (Permanent): Advocating euthanasia of children
This is a future serial killer. No amount of rehabilitation will be able to help the kid.

There needs to be a euthanasia law for something like this, as an act of mercy.
 

Cas

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,391
This is a future serial killer. No amount of rehabilitation will be able to help the kid.

There needs to be a euthanasia law for something like this, as an act of mercy.
Eeesh. No. I don't know if this kid in particular will be able to come around, but there are tons of others just like him getting therapy and help for similar deficits. They may never have the natural ability to relate emotionally, but they can learn how to act in society and practice correct responses. Most of them do not end up violent killers.
 

'3y Kingdom

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,369
Without any extra information, a lot of these posts are self-satisfied victim blaming, nothing more.
 

Tigress

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,091
Washington
That probably wouldn't help. Sometimes physical punishment produces worse effects - like its a challenge. Ever see a kid get whooped, yet they don't cry, they just snarl at you? Yeah. That can happen.

I have an autistic child, and my kid went to school with a child that I feel is very similar to this kid. His mother took away his tablet because he was doing something that he shouldn't be doing. He got a mug, filled it with water and put it in the microwave until it was boiling, went into the living room, and threw it at her. It thankfully only hit her in the chest - she would have been fucked if it hit her face. When his dad came downstairs after hearing her screaming, he told the dad that she hurt him, so he was going to hurt her more. He was 9 at the time.

His parents aren't assholes. They went through all sorts of financial hoops to get their kid into a center for children with developmental needs. They don't physically punish their child - that doesn't work. They try to raise a kid that I wouldn't be able to handle.

This cop is in over his head. He is going to need some really skilled therapists to help with his son. Otherwise he's raising a criminal.
Exactly. The article some one posted about rehabbing psychopath kids was talking about how they really don't respond to punishment, it doesn't even phase them. But that they found they respond to reward, they are very wired to want that reward so the best way to get them to respond in a way you want them to behave is to use rewards to entice htem. Punish them and they won't even notice, they'll just decide maybe to get even (like this kid did when his dad took away his game console).
 

Ayato_Kanzaki

Member
Nov 22, 2017
840
why even bother joking. yeah this kid needs help because just locking him up isn't going to help matters and it will likely turn him into a real menace when he gets out.
Locking him is going to help a ton. It's just the other potential victims that will be helped. And he might not ever get out if the doctors still consider him a latent threat.

A psychiatric hospital is the only realist option. The parents aren't going to love or trust the kid anymore, and its not just a matter of securing the firearms. He might reach for a knife next. The parents won't dare scold the kid anymore out of fear of what he might do.
The family's bonds with the kid are already destroyed behond recovery.
 
Nov 6, 2017
6,709
Los Angeles
Who wants to bet those parents aren’t some upstanding loving caring TLC types

Dad is a cop, you know that authority role seeped into the family home

Kids don’t magically become serial killers without agitation
Something in the household over years led up to this

If I’m wrong and this kid did this on first removal of his personal items, Jesus, The Omen found a reboot story
Sometimes they do actually. Not all serial killers have sob stories.

Wow. I can only imagine what is going threw the father's mind. To know that your son wanted you dead.
In my shoes, I'd try to give the kid up for adoption.

I don't want to be worried every day that my kid is going to throw a random tantrum and shoot me. I have to think about my safety as well as my wife's and the safety of my other kids if I have them.
 

Cas

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,391
Exactly. The article some one posted about rehabbing psychopath kids was talking about how they really don't respond to punishment, it doesn't even phase them. But that they found they respond to reward, they are very wired to want that reward so the best way to get them to respond in a way you want them to behave is to use rewards to entice htem. Punish them and they won't even notice, they'll just decide maybe to get even (like this kid did when his dad took away his game console).
Yep, that's right. Punishments and consequences don't work very well on a child that does not have the ability to reflect or regret their actions and how it hurt others. They have a very hard time accepting responsibility for their actions.
 

devSin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,429
If that 2nd one is true then his parents have some culpability in how insane he is.
Sociopaths manipulate and lie. It's a hallmark of the condition.

Kid is going to need a lot of therapy and need to be watched
You can't fix sociopathy. Given his tendency for violence, he needs to be held in a secure psychiatric ward, probably forever.

It’s an 11 year old being shitty. The problem is guns.
No, the child is a sociopath. He's also attacked peers and animals.