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Anova/Sous-Vide ERA

Oct 25, 2017
2,291
#1
Hey Ya'll,

Since we had quite a few people who ordered the Anova Nano, I figured we could continue the discussion here. Have you gotten your Precision Cooker yet? Waiting for the Nano?

I just got my PC last week and it's been fantastic. Cooked up a few steaks (3 different marinades) to start off. 130 degrees for about 3 hours. Just your typical top sirloin medium quality steaks from Costco. All I have to say is....holy shit. So tender, so perfectly cooked throughout, so easy. Quick sear in the cast-iron for about a minute total and I could eat them with a butter knife.

I am a bit perplexed about one thing though....chicken. We tried chicken the other night (2 marinades, one dry, one wet), and while the wet marinated chicken was indeed very tender, the dry marinade ended up surprisingly dry. I expected both to maintain their moistness due to being sealed in the bags. Now, I didn't actually seal the bags myself, and I did notice that the person who did left some air at the top of the bag, even though the chicken was entirely submerged. We also cooked it at 150 degrees for about 2 hours. I'm thinking maybe the remaining air in the bag allowed the moisture to escape the meat? Everything I've seen says the bags need as much air as possible removed, even the parts that aren't submerged. We just got some dedicated sous-vide bags, so we'll see if they work better than the normal ziplocks we've been using so far.

Anyways, feel free to post your experiments and recipes. Now we're cooking with water!
 

diablos991

Banned
Member
Oct 26, 2017
933
#4
My Anova BT came in this week.
Picked up some cheap ribeyes from the grocery store and fired it up. Only did a quick dry rub and bagged them with garlic.

Turned out alright. 130 was a bit to well done for my taste but boy were the steaks juicy!

I’m looking forward to discovering the quirks of this cooker. I think I’m going to try some scallops this weekend.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,161
#5
Chicken is eh.

Get a blow torch and some cow!

It makes no sense that the chicken was dry, but how much "leftover" liquid was left in the bag. (The liquid does not magically appear in the bag.)
 
OP
OP
LGHT_TRSN
Oct 25, 2017
2,291
#6
Chicken is eh.

Get a blow torch and some cow!

It makes no sense that the chicken was dry, but how much "leftover" liquid was left in the bag. (The liquid does not magically appear in the bag.)
That's the weird thing, there was basically no liquid in the bag after cooking. I think our friend who put them in "sealed" the bag, but neither sealed it nor actually got all the air out of it and just though "good enough!"

I sealed the steaks and they were super moist, so *shrug* I'm sure the vacuum seal bags we got will work better. I do need a torch. Using the cast iron was REALLY smoky.
 
Oct 25, 2017
150
#8
I've been loving my Anova since the original batch went out in 2014. I still maintain some of the best things I've made have been double cut pork chops, cooked med-rare and the smoked paprika shrimp from Serious Eats.

Steaks are fine, but unless I'm cooking for a large group, I don't find it all that worth it to pull out the circulator. Tough cuts + a long cook is a whole different story however.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,161
#9
That's the weird thing, there was basically no liquid in the bag after cooking. I think our friend who put them in "sealed" the bag, but neither sealed it nor actually got all the air out of it and just though "good enough!"

I sealed the steaks and they were super moist, so *shrug* I'm sure the vacuum seal bags we got will work better. I do need a torch. Using the cast iron was REALLY smoky.
Sorry but this makes no sense to me. I guess the "zip" of the zip lock bag was no submerged? I am just struggling to see how it would dry out if the bag was underwater in the bath.
 
Oct 26, 2017
44
#10
I pre-ordered the Nano, but decided to just take them up on the regular BT cooker instead. We've done hard boiled eggs, a roast and a flank steak with it so far.

The flank steak was amazing! I salted and peppered the steak and then put it into ziplock bags, then cooked for two hours at 129. Took that out and put it in a pan with some butter and oil, just long enough on each side to get a little crust. Poured the juices from the bag over the steak and served. Worked really well!

The eggs were easy, I'll probably just do them like this from now on, super easy and they came out at the right consistency that my wife likes.

The roast was good, but the silver skin at the bottom of the roast didn't really soften enough to loosen from the meat, so it was a little awkward to eat. The meat itself came out pretty well.

I wasn't 100% sold on it before, but everything turned out pretty well and I think I'll keep using it. The long cook times require a lot of prep that I don't always have the time for though. Any tips on making that better or should I just get better at planning meals?
 
OP
OP
LGHT_TRSN
Oct 25, 2017
2,291
#11
Sorry but this makes no sense to me. I guess the "zip" of the zip lock bag was no submerged? I am just struggling to see how it would dry out if the bag was underwater in the bath.
Yeah, exactly. We had these giant ziplock bags that wouldn't fit in the pot so we were pinning the top part (zip) to the side of the pot, so there's a chance the bag wasn't sealed completely (and there was air towards the top).
 
Oct 26, 2017
21
#13
I use my Joule all the time. Did some Ribeyes last night. Bagged them with cloves of garlic, rosemary, thyme, and olive oil - 127 for an hour. Turned out great after a hard sear.

 
Last edited:

piratepwnsninja

Lead Game Designer
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
1,297
#16
Still waiting for my Nano to ship before I join the Church of Sous Vide. Have a ton of recipes to try thanks to being on Anova's mailing list.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,059
#17
The roast was good, but the silver skin at the bottom of the roast didn't really soften enough to loosen from the meat, so it was a little awkward to eat. The meat itself came out pretty well.
Yeah, you always want to trim that before you cook. It's far easier.

I don't have a sous-vide machine yet. I want one. :(
 
Oct 25, 2017
434
Fresno CA
#23
I got my anova bt recently, haven't used it yet though. What would you guys recommend as a vacuum sealer, or do I need one? Can I just use ziplocks? What's best? This my very first sous vide
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,161
#25
I got my anova bt recently, haven't used it yet though. What would you guys recommend as a vacuum sealer, or do I need one? Can I just use ziplocks? What's best? This my very first sous vide
Use zip locks and a straw to suck the air out. You do not need a vacuum sealer.

Never had Juniors, but I can say using this recipe

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-mak...ecipe-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchen-110760

Lead to one of the most rich and velvety cheesecakes I ever had.
Cool, I have been on a baking kick recently so I will try it.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,176
Seattle
#27
Bruhs! I've got 100lbs of freshly butchered cow to go through this year. I'll try to contribute to the ironOT infinite. I plan to sous vide most of it, and grill the rest.
 
Oct 26, 2017
21
#28
Fun trick - take the zip lock and push it under the surface of the water slowly before zipping it. The water will push the air out. Then zip it just before the top of the zip lock gets to the water level. You don't even need a straw.

And if it doesn't sink throw a spoon in the bag.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,161
#29
Really! Go to about 2:40.

Also skip the butter, not needed in sous vide.

Fun trick - take the zip lock and push it under the surface of the water slowly before zipping it. The water will push the air out. Then zip it just before the top of the zip lock gets to the water level. You don't even need a straw.

And if it doesn't sink throw a spoon in the bag.
I actually did the immersion method until the obvious straw method smacked me in the face. Prefer the straw honestly, just to avoid burning fingers.

Bruhs! I've got 100lbs of freshly butchered cow to go through this year. I'll try to contribute to the ironOT infinite. I plan to sous vide most of it, and grill the rest.
Make sure you get a Picanha steak if you have not butchered it yet. The cut is hard to find in the USA but it is made for sous vide. Better than Ribeye.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,881
#32
I would think that vacuum sealing would turn out cheaper than buying ziplock bags in the long run? There are more uses for a vacuum sealer than sous vide, so I just bit the bullet and picked one up. There are inexpensive sealers and rolls of vacuum bag (seal one side, vacuum and seal the other) easily picked up on Amazon.

And suggestions on containers to use for my Anova Precision? Ended up getting it as a replacement for my Nano preorder. I did a steak in a medium size pot but it was tricky getting it to fit inside with the cooker while minimally touching it.
 

Shao Kahn

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
6,943
The Wild Mare
#34
Honestly, it's pretty good but you'll only use it once a month if you want some great steak.

Everything else takes too long, and it still end up in the frying pan. I found the list of recipes quite lacking as well.

Also, buy large sized Ziplocks and medium sized Bowtie clips. Also, try getting the wifi version. Bluetooth is quite limiting if you want to run hour+ long sessions.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,514
#35
Op if you need help with any times and Temps, I recommend download Chefsteps Joule app. It's designed to be used with the Joule device, but it's a great way to check temp and time for different dishes. If you have a Facebook account, I also recommend you check out the sous vide groups there.

Honestly, it's pretty good but you'll only use it once a month if you want some great steak.

Everything else takes too long, and it still end up in the frying pan. I found the list of recipes quite lacking as well.

Also, buy large sized Ziplocks and medium sized Bowtie clips. Also, try getting the wifi version. Bluetooth is quite limiting if you want to run hour+ long sessions.
I gotta disagree with it taking too long. It's a godsend for me. I don't have much time to prep dinner on my weekends, so I take a weekend to prep a whole bunch of meats, season, seal, and freeze them. Then the day before work, I drop some food in the water, go about my business and then finish searing.
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
1,972
#36
One thing I need to figure out is if I can throw veggies in the thing while cooking meats.

I use a cast iron skillet with a propane torch as my searing method. Everything was a pain in the ass until I got that, now it's ezpz. Highly recommended. I'm also considering getting the searzall too.

The GF is annoyed by how I know try to blowtorch everything. I even use it to help dry the skillet off!

That being said, what are some "surprising" things to make in a sous vide? That cheesecake for example is stuff I'm looking for.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,514
#37
One thing I need to figure out is if I can throw veggies in the thing while cooking meats.

I use a cast iron skillet with a propane torch as my searing method. Everything was a pain in the ass until I got that, now it's ezpz. Highly recommended. I'm also considering getting the searzall too.

The GF is annoyed by how I know try to blowtorch everything. I even use it to help dry the skillet off!

That being said, what are some "surprising" things to make in a sous vide? That cheesecake for example is stuff I'm looking for.
Not exactly surprising but it's pretty nice for corn on the cob. I've also seen people use sinks and bath tubs for sous vide containers. Oh and you can use it to heat up a baby bottle.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,146
#38
I opted for the BT model since I didn't want to wait for the Nano. I plan on using it for chicken, fish, shrimp, and eggs. Though some of the posts about chicken here worry me.
 
Oct 25, 2017
150
#39
I opted for the BT model since I didn't want to wait for the Nano. I plan on using it for chicken, fish, shrimp, and eggs. Though some of the posts about chicken here worry me.
Chicken is fine. I've never had dry chicken made sous vide as described in the OP. You might just have to play around with times and temps a bit. Fortunately, chicken breasts are super cheap.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,146
#40
Chicken is fine. I've never had dry chicken made sous vide as described in the OP. You might just have to play around with times and temps a bit. Fortunately, chicken breasts are super cheap.
Out of curiosity, have you ever tried other parts of a chicken? Or mainly breasts?
 

plagiarize

Skinny Dipping in Cauldron Lake
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
6,645
Cape Cod, MA
#41
Oh yay. Was hoping this would crop up. I got mine a week ago and have been really enjoying it so far.

Day one was onsen eggs. If you haven't had them, totally do. Basically, follow the boiled egg setting and pick the lowest temperature. They are fantastic in ramen which is how we had them. The idea of them seems off putting for a lot of people, but they are delicious and not something we could have ever cooked at home without the Anova or another sous vide cooker. If you've never had them before, I'm sure this looks disgusting. If you have? I'm sure you're drooling.


Day two was pork tenderloin, without seasonings just to see how the meat came out. My wife was reallllly disappointed that the medium rare tenderloin was cold in the middle by the time I sliced it and transferred it to the plate, post searing. I enjoyed it, and it looked great, but when I did the rest of it, I did it at a hotter temperature and didn't slice it before plating this time and she enjoyed it much more.


Day Three was a random piece of steak I asked my wife to buy because she isn't great at picking out steak, and I figured I could cook it longer if it wasn't great meat. I forget exactly what it was, but it came out well. I think I seared it for too long though and the middle was not the right temp in the thinner parts of the steak. My cat Rowdy was about as aggressive as I've ever seen him trying to steal our food.


Day four was no sear chicken breast cooking with salt, pepper, cumin and rosemary. My wife liked it so much she demanded it again the next day. Not the most appealing looking meal I've done with it, but not remotely dry (cooked at 150F for two hours from frozen), so I'm not sure what LGHT_TRSN must of done to theirs. Yes, I just added the seasonings right to the same Ziploc we'd frozen the chicken breast in and tossed it in the water. Couldn't have been easier.


Tonight, I followed the recipe in the app for Chocolate Pot de Crème. We won't be trying it until after a night in the fridge, but it was easy enough to do. This picture is *before* it went into the water bath, but the blue jars don't look so appealing with the lids on. I'm looking forwards to trying this tomorrow!


Saturday I'm going to try that recipe forJuicy Lucys, which I'm pretty excited about too.

All in all I'm very happy with it. A couple of nights a week my wife gets home late, so being able to quickly throw the food in and get it going right when I get home works really well for me, when combined with those loooong windows at which to take it out. All I have to do is pull the meat out and sear it (or in the case of chicken breast not even bother with that) and I can get hot food or her plate right after she gets home.
 
Oct 25, 2017
434
Fresno CA
#42
Oh yay. Was hoping this would crop up. I got mine a week ago and have been really enjoying it so far.

Day one was onsen eggs. If you haven't had them, totally do. Basically, follow the boiled egg setting and pick the lowest temperature. They are fantastic in ramen which is how we had them. The idea of them seems off putting for a lot of people, but they are delicious and not something we could have ever cooked at home without the Anova or another sous vide cooker. If you've never had them before, I'm sure this looks disgusting. If you have? I'm sure you're drooling.


Day two was pork tenderloin, without seasonings just to see how the meat came out. My wife was reallllly disappointed that the medium rare tenderloin was cold in the middle by the time I sliced it and transferred it to the plate, post searing. I enjoyed it, and it looked great, but when I did the rest of it, I did it at a hotter temperature and didn't slice it before plating this time and she enjoyed it much more.


Day Three was a random piece of steak I asked my wife to buy because she isn't great at picking out steak, and I figured I could cook it longer if it wasn't great meat. I forget exactly what it was, but it came out well. I think I seared it for too long though and the middle was not the right temp in the thinner parts of the steak. My cat Rowdy was about as aggressive as I've ever seen him trying to steal our food.


Day four was no sear chicken breast cooking with salt, pepper, cumin and rosemary. My wife liked it so much she demanded it again the next day. Not the most appealing looking meal I've done with it, but not remotely dry (cooked at 150F for two hours from frozen), so I'm not sure what LGHT_TRSN must of done to theirs. Yes, I just added the seasonings right to the same Ziploc we'd frozen the chicken breast in and tossed it in the water. Couldn't have been easier.


Tonight, I followed the recipe in the app for Chocolate Pot de Crème. We won't be trying it until after a night in the fridge, but it was easy enough to do. This picture is *before* it went into the water bath, but the blue jars don't look so appealing with the lids on. I'm looking forwards to trying this tomorrow!


Saturday I'm going to try that recipe forJuicy Lucys, which I'm pretty excited about too.

All in all I'm very happy with it. A couple of nights a week my wife gets home late, so being able to quickly throw the food in and get it going right when I get home works really well for me, when combined with those loooong windows at which to take it out. All I have to do is pull the meat out and sear it (or in the case of chicken breast not even bother with that) and I can get hot food or her plate right after she gets home.
Great husband! And man those pics and all this advice is really welcome! I'm going on a work trip this Sunday and my family is going to cook dinner this Saturday before I go so I may try out my anova then and try and whip something up, this seems a lot easier than I thought it'd be. Wow. Thanks for everything everyone. If I do it this Saturday I'll post results and thoughts
 
Oct 25, 2017
150
#43
Out of curiosity, have you ever tried other parts of a chicken? Or mainly breasts?
I've done thighs (apparently all dark meat has the same issue), but they have a kind of slimy texture I don't really like until they get up around traditional cooking temps.
 

plagiarize

Skinny Dipping in Cauldron Lake
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
6,645
Cape Cod, MA
#44
The Chocolate pots de Creme came out nicely. Smooth and thick with a good salty kick. Definitely a recipe to try if you like the sound of that. Tomorrow it's time for those juicy Lucy's. I'll let everyone know how it turns out.
 
Oct 25, 2017
386
#45
Just used my Anova for the first time. Cooked a pork tenderloin. That was as simple as can be, and it came out very tender and juicy. Gonna cook some shrimp with it tomorrow!
 
Oct 27, 2017
24
#46
I'm not a very adventurous eater so I wasn't really sure if I'd get any use out of it but figured the price was too good to pass up and worst case my younger brother would use it. The first thing I tried was carrots. Great flavor. My older brother was skeptical but immediately came around after his first bite. Then my younger brother tried a steak (not a big steak person so I couldn't tell you what kind) and liked it so much he did it again the next night! After that I did some 12 hour ribs which were pretty good too. I probably still prefer traditionally smoked ribs but being able to put them in when I get up in the morning, go about my day without even thinking about them, and then have really tender, delicious ribs within a half hour of getting home from work is amazing. I'm going to try a 24 hour cook at a lower temp next time because I've read it's even better. Most recently I tried a nice sized chicken breast and was very happy with that as well. My only complaint would be that it seemed to cool down a little too quick for me.

All in all I'm very pleased so far and looking for more ideas to try.
 
Oct 27, 2017
62
#47
I've been sous vide-ing for most of this year and it as really turned me on to cooking in general, and I've lost about 50 pounds having it as part of my diet(the more work/time you put into food the more you want to save for later I've found). I've done various types of steaks and honestly I can't stand eating them at restaurants now as I've basically nailed down how to make them "perfectly".

With that said though, meat isn't the only thing you can sous vide. A few months back my work had a potluck and I decided to be a bit adventurous and made cheesecake jars.



So the cheesecake is put into small seal-able mason jars and that allows it to be sous vide-able which was a fun experiment to try. Takes about 60 minutes to cook, but then needs to be refrigerated.

I tried combining the crust with the cheesecake in two ways. One where the crust is at the bottom of the jar and cooked with the cheesecake and another where it's put on top afterwards. Neither is perfect as the first gets more soggy than the latter and the latter makes it kind of hard to dig into the cheesecake. Might need to use larger jars but in any case I preferred the crunchier crust. The crust itself is mostly graham cracker, butter and sugar pan heated in advance.





It was pretty fun "project" to try out and i was really happy with the results. The flavor/texture was great and the form factor with the jar made it a bit of a personal gift rather than just dessert. I also made some blueberry and strawberry topping to eat with it. The ones above were from my first batch where I overfilled them so topping on that made it a bit messy as it crumbled out of the jar. The recipe I used was from here if anyone is interested in taking a stab at it. https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/the-quickest-simplest-way-to-make-bomb-cheesecake

Anyhow sous vide sure is neat and I'll keep my eyes on this thread to find out what people have been trying. It's mostly been steak and chicken for me so if anyone has more extravagant foods they tried cooking with it I'm all ears. :)
 

plagiarize

Skinny Dipping in Cauldron Lake
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
6,645
Cape Cod, MA
#49
I'm going to try cooking London Broil for like, a day, to see what happens to it. I've heard conflicting things on whether this is too long a time or not, but I'm also kind of curious what happens when you overcook something in Sous Vide, so even if we end up eating take out tomorrow, it'll be worthwhile.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,514
#50
I'm so happy to know that I'm not the only person who has done this.

(I also use it sometimes to defrost frozen milk when the baby is being a handful.)
I've never done it myself lol. A friend of mine did it and things seemed to be OK.