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Anova/Sous-Vide ERA

bye

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
2,637
Phoenix, AZ
Girlfriend bought a massive pork butt which we had to split into 3 pieces. First one was at 140 for 24 hours, then 30 mins on gas grill. Had good tenderness and was mostly pink but two issues were at some point it escaped from being weighed down and floated to the top so there was some unevenness in cooking and without being double-bagged a lot of water got inside (and stuff from the bag in the container).

Second one was at 150 for 24 hours and 30 on the grill. This was cooked evenly and still tender but more solid. Double bagged this time and made sure to weigh down properly.

I'm starting the third one tomorrow and will either go back to 140 or maybe try 145, again for 24 hours and again finish on grill.

Will post pics.

Also, I was looking at sous vide weights and god damn - almost $30. Right now we're just using various metal kitchenware stacked on top of the bag lol.
You’re better off investing in a cheap vacuum sealer. I got one on amazon for $30. Water in sous vide bags can really fuck everything up. If it’s properly sealed the lack of air will keep it from floating. No need for weights or clips.
 
Dec 11, 2017
6,304
I'm no expert here, but from what I've had explained to me it can actually get less tender the longer it is in. It's not a linear ratio between time and tender. There is usually a couple hour time frame where it will be great, and then it might get too mushy.




The trick is to vacuum seal, or really get as much air out as possible. That will solve the floating issues for free. Air is the buoyant.
You’re better off investing in a cheap vacuum sealer. I got one on amazon for $30. Water in sous vide bags can really fuck everything up. If it’s properly sealed the lack of air will keep it from floating. No need for weights or clips.
No it was vacuum sealed. Machine may just not have sealed it 100% perfectly and it’s possible if it was something that was in there only an hour or two may not have happened but even a tiny bit over 24 hours obviously adds up. Anyway double bagging fixed it.
 
Oct 26, 2017
4,330
Does anybody sous vide their salmon? I wonder if there's a point to it really since it's so easy to get a perfect cook on the pan
 

jts

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,562
Pleased with Anova’s service. Shipped me a new clamp really fast after the older one broke. The design doesn’t seem fixed but I’ll try to be more careful. Don’t over-tighten your Anovas!
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,694
Los Angeles, CA
This Guga Foods/SVE video has me very curious to find out how good medium-rare pork tenderloin tastes:


They don't sous vide in this video, but the precision of an Anova would overcome my health prejudices.
 
Dec 11, 2017
6,304
Last piece of pork butt is in the Anova at 140 and will be for about 26 hours. Then on the grill. This was our first experience with long cooking and learned quite a bit.

Also, yesterday we did some Italian sausage and NAILED them. 140 for a little over an hour, then hit it with a hot iron cast for about 8 minutes making sure to get a nice brown on all sides. It was absolutely perfect inside, possibly best sausages we’ve ever made.
 

Cochese

Banned
Member
Nov 14, 2017
6,960
This Guga Foods/SVE video has me very curious to find out how good medium-rare pork tenderloin tastes:


They don't sous vide in this video, but the precision of an Anova would overcome my health prejudices.
It tastes fucking awesome. My wife tends to undercook meats, so I’ve been eating pinker port tenderloin for years. It’s the undercooked chicken that I hate.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
This Guga Foods/SVE video has me very curious to find out how good medium-rare pork tenderloin tastes:


They don't sous vide in this video, but the precision of an Anova would overcome my health prejudices.
It's great. It's super tender. I did 145F for 1.5hrs a couple weeks ago. ChefSteps says their fave is actually 136F.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,074
got two chicken breasts in right now. any tips for breasts or chicken in general. its my first time, so we'll see how it goes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,892
Quite happy with my Joule, but I do wish I went with Anova due to the manual temp control. Oh well.

Chicken has been a surprise so far. Some salt, herbes de Provence and some olive oil, cooked to 140 and finished with a sear. Wow. So easy to make insanely juicy chicken.

Pork side ribs also came out amazing. 155 for 20 hours and finished on the grill. I'll go lower on the next cook since finishing on the grill probably brings it up another 20 degrees, but I'll need a bit more time. Sounds like 140 needs closer to 36 hours to break down the connective tissue. But stellar ribs...I've never had side ribs that were just as tender as baby back ribs. Win for sous-vide right there. I did have to rebag after the first night, since I learned that vacuum sealing is not perfect. In the morning there was a big air pocket in the bag. Sounds like a combination of water evaporation and air stuck in the bones/cracks of the ribs. I just rebagged and kept cooking. I think I'll make a bigger bag than I need to in the future so that I can just cut and reseal it for long cooks.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,074
150F for an hour.
I had mine at 165 for 2 hours. Finished with a sear in the cast iron pan. It came out just OK. It was marinated from the market but I really couldn't taste the marinade at all. It was soft though, but not as juicy as I was expecting. Reminded me of the Costco rotisserie chicken, which is still pretty good.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
Quite happy with my Joule, but I do wish I went with Anova due to the manual temp control. Oh well.
You mean the physical buttons on the unit?

I had mine at 165 for 2 hours. Finished with a sear in the cast iron pan. It came out just OK. It was marinated from the market but I really couldn't taste the marinade at all. It was soft though, but not as juicy as I was expecting. Reminded me of the Costco rotisserie chicken, which is still pretty good.
I did two breasts at 149 for 1.5 hrs last night (very thick cuts, it's 45 mins for 1-inch thick), that's Joule's recommended setting. Definitely try going lower than 165 next time.
Marinades don't really penetrate well and could kinda get "washed out" by water leaving the meat. You want something that will give a brine effect, things with salt & maybe some sugar. Or save that liquid from the bag and reduce it in another pan while you sear to get that marinade back.
 

Cochese

Banned
Member
Nov 14, 2017
6,960
Haven't had any luck with pickle juice, it actually does wash out the flavor that I normally get with just a dry powder coat. Actually, about to put two halves in now for lunch, I'll post pics. I don't even bothering to sear.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
I'm starting to think dry rubs are just the way to go. Trying to reason it out in my head, I think the re-hydration of the dry spices gives it more of an impact. I've noticed this with granulated garlic vs cloves whole/pressed/minced.
 

Cochese

Banned
Member
Nov 14, 2017
6,960
I'm starting to think dry rubs are just the way to go. Trying to reason it out in my head, I think the re-hydration of the dry spices gives it more of an impact. I've noticed this with granulated garlic vs cloves whole/pressed/minced.
Yup, SVE did an experiment between minced, "real", powdered, etc. Powdered won the taste test, IIRC.

My rub is salt, pepper, garlic powder, cayenne, smoked paprika, and a little bit of seasoned salt. Works well, but needs more heat.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
Yup, SVE did an experiment between minced, "real", powdered, etc. Powdered won the taste test, IIRC.

My rub is salt, pepper, garlic powder, cayenne, smoked paprika, and a little bit of seasoned salt. Works well, but needs more heat.
I saw that and sorta did my own not-side-by-side testing over my next few cooks of different things and they're right. Not that I had any doubt but I had to try. Pleasant surprise finding out you don't really have to fuck around garlic heads/cloves anymore. Your rub is like the all-star team of SV seasonings, all of those stand up like champs. Everybody copy that!
 

Cochese

Banned
Member
Nov 14, 2017
6,960


Straight out of the bag after draining.

These were good, but I haven't had that holy shit moment since my first couple, and I'm not sure why. Could be that I used table salt in the mix to get a stable consistency, and I need to go back to using kosher salt. These were also a bit drier at the same time and temp as the other ones, but I have been extending the time by about five minutes. These were from one breast filleted, because they were so damn big. Good, but not great. Still experimenting.
 
Nov 15, 2017
2,765
You’re better off investing in a cheap vacuum sealer. I got one on amazon for $30. Water in sous vide bags can really fuck everything up. If it’s properly sealed the lack of air will keep it from floating. No need for weights or clips.
You can't get all air out, and heat will cause more gasses to form. If it's a big item, and especially if it's been smoked first, and will float eventually for long cooks.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,027
That's a good idea. Next time I'll try that.

I just have a shit ton of ground beef I need to defrost when I get home. It's almost like an ice block.

Haven't found the sweet spot yet
You can do it. For chicken breasts, I add an extra hour of cook time.

If you just want to quick-thaw, you can run the circulator at room temperature and just drop them in there for 15 minutes or so. Usually does the trick.
 
Oct 26, 2017
4,330
That's a good idea. Next time I'll try that.

I just have a shit ton of ground beef I need to defrost when I get home. It's almost like an ice block.

Haven't found the sweet spot yet
I usually go just above room temperature, so around 75 as suggested by the other. I'm not actually sure if that's ideal though
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
it's probably not recommended (erring on the side of caution) to just do a defrost by itself. from a food safety standpoint it's a race against time. it's better to just cook from frozen all the way through.

for complete pasteurization you want a center temp of 130F held there for 2 hours. the time goes down as the temp goes up, tho. so 135F is about 40 minutes. 140 is 12 minutes.
for a whole cut, you can do a quick dip in nearly boiling water to sanitize the surface, but that won't do for ground up meat.
 

RetroMG

Community Resettler
Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,226
Oh yeah, I should say, when I do this, I'm defrosting just long enough to season or do whatever I need to in order to get it cooking.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,074
You mean the physical buttons on the unit?



I did two breasts at 149 for 1.5 hrs last night (very thick cuts, it's 45 mins for 1-inch thick), that's Joule's recommended setting. Definitely try going lower than 165 next time.
Marinades don't really penetrate well and could kinda get "washed out" by water leaving the meat. You want something that will give a brine effect, things with salt & maybe some sugar. Or save that liquid from the bag and reduce it in another pan while you sear to get that marinade back.
thanks for the tips! i especially like that idea of reducing that left over liquid. but same deal happened with a marinated ny strip i got from the same market, i got tons of water in the bag. probably just start to stay away from marinated meats all together from here on.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,027
Oh yeah, I should say, when I do this, I'm defrosting just long enough to season or do whatever I need to in order to get it cooking.
Yeah, a short, controlled bath to thaw should be fine. I believe a lab somewhere even determined that a brief hot-water bath did the trick even better, although they may have been testing using chicken breasts and not ground meat.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
marinades are still good for thin cuts, your surface area to internal... mass? ratio is a lot better. but you can tell when you cut in to a marinated thick piece how far it's gone in and it's never... well, enough.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,027
marinades are still good for thin cuts, your surface area to internal... mass? ratio is a lot better. but you can tell when you cut in to a marinated thick piece how far it's gone in and it's never... well, enough.
Jaccard + a two day marinade, baybee
 
Oct 27, 2017
49
I follow Sous Vide Everything on youtube. They actually got me into sous vide. Every cut of steak I've cooked sous vide has been excellent, especially rib eyes. Last Friday I tried Picanha, SVE's favorite cut of steak. It was very underwhelming. For anyone who's tried Picanha, is it suppose to have a little hint of liver aftertaste? I know for a fact the meat was not spoiled. It was nice and red, no odor, didn't get sick after eating it.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
Jaccard + a two day marinade, baybee
there ya go.

I follow Sous Vide Everything on youtube. They actually got me into sous vide. Every cut of steak I've cooked sous vide has been excellent, especially rib eyes. Last Friday I tried Picanha, SVE's favorite cut of steak. It was very underwhelming. For anyone who's tried Picanha, is it suppose to have a little hint of liver aftertaste? I know for a fact the meat was not spoiled. It was nice and red, no odor, didn't get sick after eating it.
they don't sell picanha near me i dont think, maybe the fancy butcher, but i'd definitely like to try with all their hype.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,080
I'm starting to think dry rubs are just the way to go. Trying to reason it out in my head, I think the re-hydration of the dry spices gives it more of an impact. I've noticed this with granulated garlic vs cloves whole/pressed/minced.
Personally I only ever do dry rubs. I'll occasionally throw in some aromatics like rosemary or something but for the most part I stay away from fresh garlic etc. I love it all but it just doesn't impart a flavor like dry seasonings do
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,043
as a sort-of aside, i hate how big chicken breasts have become. getting a "small" one is like a treat.
not sure what coast you're on but Stop and Shop have 'healthy'/organic store-brand bags of half dozen individually wrapped breasts that are about half the size as the ones in the traditional styrofoam packaging. the packaging is pretty wasteful but damn if they aren't the perfect size for sandwiches and the like.