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Anova/Sous-Vide ERA

Oct 25, 2017
9,210
ive been spending money on ribeye and love the way it comes out. i even learn to use a cast iron skillet LOL
since i picked up an air fryer ill try it out in there too and see how that works.
 
Nov 15, 2017
2,765
Guys and Gals, i plan to buy my first sous vide on Amazon. Which is the best one to get?
Anova 800 or 900 watt, and the Joule are the two brands that are most popular in the stick sous vides. Joule is a little nicer but more expensive and has no physical controls, only app. The Anovas do physical and app controls.
 
Oct 27, 2017
273
So I had ended up with the

"ChefSteps Joule Sous Vide, 1100 Watts, All White"



I hope I made the right decision. My mom is looking at me like I'm crazy to buy it so it'll be fun when I do make some food with this thing.

I Sincerely want to give my thanks to everyone with their suggestions.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,074
im going to be having guests over for xmas and im wanting to do a prime rib. anyone done one that has any tips? SVE just uploaded a video today and did a 3 bone prime rib at 137 for 6 hours. he mentions a dry brine overnight but doesnt explain what or how. anyone got any tips?
 
Dec 11, 2017
6,304
I don't know why but I kept thinking asparagus took a while sous vide. It takes 15 mins. I guess I hadn't done it in so long I forgot. I find cooking it in the pan a pain in the ass as I usually have a bunch of other veggies cooking at the same time and the asparagus never comes out great. Did 185 for 15 mins in a bag with a tad bit of butter and salt and came out great. Probably do it sous vide all the time now.

im going to be having guests over for xmas and im wanting to do a prime rib. anyone done one that has any tips? SVE just uploaded a video today and did a 3 bone prime rib at 137 for 6 hours. he mentions a dry brine overnight but doesnt explain what or how. anyone got any tips?
Dry brine is just salt. Wrap it in plastic wrap.
 
Pork tenderloin I made yesterday, finished it on my friend's charcoal grill.



I made this today, lamb chops cooked to medium and finished them on my gas weber cast iron hotplate. Holy shit, this was the best meal I've ever had.



Sorry, i didn't take any pictures after i took it off the grill, it was too good, so i forgot to take pics.
 
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Oct 27, 2017
402
No pics, but I sous vide'd my first standing rib roast for the family using Guga's recipe from Sous Vide Everything. I finished it in the oven after slathering a butter, garlic, rosemary mixture on top of the roast. Turned out great. And it was medium rare throughout and juicy and tender. Easy peasy.
 
Nov 14, 2017
36
So question: I got an Anova BT recently and have tried a few things first was carnitas and they turned out amazing. Second was a grass fed NY Strip and the texture was perfect but the flavor was a bit off, it got a great sear and was very juicy, just didn’t taste as good as even a well done steak. What could have happened? It was bagged with just salt and pepper and a small pat of butter.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,404
try without butter next time. only a couple places i've seen mention this, but they say there can be a leeching effect with fats added to beef/chicken/pork but a fat is still necessary with fish/shellfish.
 
Oct 31, 2017
2
Used the family as guinea pigs and did a 20lb turkey for Christmas. (18hrs @ 150) It was fantastic, perfectly cooked and didn't have to worry about checking it. It made a ton of juice for gravy. Hot tub turkey is now requested for future holiday gatherings.
 
Dec 23, 2018
544
Great thread.

I don’t use my Anova as often as I should but it’s an excellent bit of kit. Another great buy was the Razzori vacuum sealer. Dead handy to fit in a drawer out of the way and perfect for sealing, marinading and freezing foodstuffs.



 

jts

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,563
I have to confess I haven’t used my Anova in some months. I’ve been just cooking stuff the regular way with honest success. Even steak and the like. Chicken I just grill on the moment. Salmon I honestly cannot see it coming out wrong, I guess the thing I feel the most where it’s key is for long cooking stuff like ribs. Those ribs impressed everyone.

Also the egg bites were great but it’s such an intensive job with all the prep, including cleaning and managing the jars, that I haven’t done them in forever.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,332
I've been searing steaks on a cast iron and broiling poultry in the oven, but lately have been thinking about getting a torch. What do people here use?
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,027
I have to confess I haven’t used my Anova in some months. I’ve been just cooking stuff the regular way with honest success. Even steak and the like. Chicken I just grill on the moment. Salmon I honestly cannot see it coming out wrong, I guess the thing I feel the most where it’s key is for long cooking stuff like ribs. Those ribs impressed everyone.

Also the egg bites were great but it’s such an intensive job with all the prep, including cleaning and managing the jars, that I haven’t done them in forever.
I've mostly used my circulators for larger cooks of late, rather than as a primary kitchen tool. And that's fine - they do exactly what I want them to do.
 
Oct 29, 2017
661
I also haven't used mine too much lately as I have decreased my meat consumption. Has anyone noticed a difference between using a ziplock vs a properly vacuum sealed item in a sous vide? I've been too cheap to buy a sealer.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,694
Los Angeles, CA
I also haven't used mine too much lately as I have decreased my meat consumption. Has anyone noticed a difference between using a ziplock vs a properly vacuum sealed item in a sous vide? I've been too cheap to buy a sealer.
Regular-ass Ziplocs have never failed me, and while it's not too hard to use the water displacement trick to force out most of the air inside, I still typically need a couple of spoons to weigh down my steaks. Mind you, I've never used my Anova above 135 F, and much higher temperatures may be less accommodating.
 
I've been searing steaks on a cast iron and broiling poultry in the oven, but lately have been thinking about getting a torch. What do people here use?
I've been doing same exact thing. Broiler does an amazing job with chicken:



I sear meats on a cast iron outside on the deck; at first i used cheap ass portable gas stove and it did an ok job when it was warm without wind, then i tried portable induction burner and was very disappointed with it. Then a few weeks ago i got an iwatani butane burner but did not really have a chance to properly test it out, but I'm pretty sure that it would do extremely well as it puts out ridiculous amount of heat.
As for torches, I used a cheap one and didn't really like it. Friend of mine picked up a searzall with benzomatic torch and he was very disappointed with it.
 
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Nov 1, 2017
248
I've been searing steaks on a cast iron and broiling poultry in the oven, but lately have been thinking about getting a torch. What do people here use?
I usually will use a torch to finish off any meat I sous vide. Works especially well with skin-on chicken thighs and pork belly. With a steak the way I like it, I find it better for me to cook it the traditional way with a cast iron skillet then sous vide. It might come out perfectly cooked but to me not as flavorful and no burnt bits to make a sauce.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,332
I usually will use a torch to finish off any meat I sous vide. Works especially well with skin-on chicken thighs and pork belly. With a steak the way I like it, I find it better for me to cook it the traditional way with a cast iron skillet then sous vide. It might come out perfectly cooked but to me not as flavorful and no burnt bits to make a sauce.
Which torch do you use?
 
Oct 28, 2017
2,152
Does anyone have any tips on how to better use the water displacement method for forcing air out of ziploc bags? I've been using it for a year but I've noticed that certain cuts of meat at specific sizes leave more air in the bag than I'd like. So short of buying reusable bags, is there anything I can do to force this air out and stop my bags from floating back to the surface?
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,694
Los Angeles, CA
Does anyone have any tips on how to better use the water displacement method for forcing air out of ziploc bags? I've been using it for a year but I've noticed that certain cuts of meat at specific sizes leave more air in the bag than I'd like. So short of buying reusable bags, is there anything I can do to force this air out and stop my bags from floating back to the surface?
Are you using a straw to suck out most of the air? I don't usually, but it makes things a lot easier.
 

jts

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,563
Since my last post I’ve been using it a bit more, actually. I usually batch cook chicken breast, divided in daily portions. Salt only, sear in high heat, sous-vide @62Cº for about 2 hours. Fast cool down in the chilly outside, sometimes with help of snow. Dry out the bags. Fridge. Perfect flexible protein for 4-5 meals.
 
Oct 29, 2017
661
Does anyone have any tips on how to better use the water displacement method for forcing air out of ziploc bags? I've been using it for a year but I've noticed that certain cuts of meat at specific sizes leave more air in the bag than I'd like. So short of buying reusable bags, is there anything I can do to force this air out and stop my bags from floating back to the surface?
Why not weight it down with something heavy with the meat? I just use heavy metal spoons or something to weigh mine down if I can't squeeze the air out.
 
Oct 28, 2017
2,152
Are you using a straw to suck out most of the air? I don't usually, but it makes things a lot easier.
Sounds like you're going to get a mouth full of cold blood if the meat is thawed. Any tutorials you've seen for this?

Why not weight it down with something heavy with the meat? I just use heavy metal spoons or something to weigh mine down if I can't squeeze the air out.
As in put the spoon in the bag with the meat? Doesn't that just create an open cavity in the bag that air and (eventually) meat juice will fill?
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,694
Los Angeles, CA
Sounds like you're going to get a mouth full of cold blood if the meat is thawed. Any tutorials you've seen for this?
1) That's not blood.
2) You definitely don't want to add marinating liquid/oil/butter in your bag because -- on top of all the liquid that will naturally release from your meat -- that creates a fluid medium that will absorb a lot of the flavor you want to remain in your meat. Pre-marinade/brine if you like and only use dry seasoning and fresh herbs in the bag.
3) Following 2), it's not too hard to tuck your meat into the "bottom corner" and suck out the air from the opposite side.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,892
To those still asking, I'd recommend the Anova.

I own a Joule, but other than the size and performance, it has major downsides. Needing to use the app is the biggest downside. It's just an unnecessary hassle once you learn your cooking temps. The side clamp also kind of sucks...the joule gets mounted quite high and the water exchange is also fairly high, so you need to fill a small rubermaid tub nearly all the way to avoid cooking with a splashing noise.

If I had to redo it, I'd get a plain jane Anova. I find using an app pretty pointless for sous vide.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,524
Illinois
What do you think gives the best results through the sous vide method?

In about a week I'm going to do some pork belly for ramen. I'm kind of excited about it.
In fact we do ramen every weekend and often use pork belly. Seal the belly up, raw, with whatever you like, I use 1c. Soy sauce and 1/2 c. Sugar and put it in the water at 180 f for at least 12 hours, preferably like 18.

Ice bath it, and once completely cooled just slice and sear. People love it
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,338
In fact we do ramen every weekend and often use pork belly. Seal the belly up, raw, with whatever you like, I use 1c. Soy sauce and 1/2 c. Sugar and put it in the water at 180 f for at least 12 hours, preferably like 18.

Ice bath it, and once completely cooled just slice and sear. People love it
This sounds like great advice and I'll give it a go. Probably be in another week or two, but I'll post back with the results whenever we do it.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,524
Illinois
The vacuum sealer can also marinade things in seconds, saving tons of time. One example is pickles. Slice a bunch of cucumbers, add your liquid and vacuum seal it, instant pickles on the fly.

Saving time is what the sous vide is all about!
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,318
I've been doing same exact thing. Broiler does an amazing job with chicken:



I sear meats on a cast iron outside on the deck; at first i used cheap ass portable gas stove and it did an ok job when it was warm without wind, then i tried portable induction burner and was very disappointed with it. Then a few weeks ago i got an iwatani butane burner but did not really have a chance to properly test it out, but I'm pretty sure that it would do extremely well as it puts out ridiculous amount of heat.
As for torches, I used a cheap one and didn't really like it. Friend of mine picked up a searzall with benzomatic torch and he was very disappointed with it.
man.... I always forget that a Broiler is a thing. (unless I make BBQ ribs, as I want that slightly burnt sauce on them :P)
I've gotta try that with my chicken next time because searing it is not working well lol.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,332
man.... I always forget that a Broiler is a thing. (unless I make BBQ ribs, as I want that slightly burnt sauce on them :P)
I've gotta try that with my chicken next time because searing it is not working well lol.
I've had much much better success broiling skin-on chicken than searing on a cast iron