Applying for jobs is exhausting and soul-crushing

Aldi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,401
United Kingdom
I hate it when you go for an interview and they say they'll let you know a decision in a around a week yet they don't contact you for 2+ weeks or in one instance, not at all. I understand that there are complications to recruiting, but they could at least send you an email explaining that the process has been delayed.

I interview people for positions all the time and I appreciate that it's huge deal for people looking for work so I try to contact everyone as soon a decision is made. If I know somone isnt right for the role i contact them the very next day.
 

DrainedSpirit

Member
Mar 25, 2019
176
Been applying for jobs for almost six months and it feels totally hopeless. Been called to interviews and it seems great but they always end up picking someone with more experience (I only have my degree and working experience from a totally different field). There are always going to be someone who has more experience than I so how the hell am I ever going to get picked? Last interview I travelled back and forth for 12+h and the douche hadn't even prepared any specific questions and just adlibbed from my profile he had in front of him. Didn't get that job in the end because I apparently only showed what I wanted from the job but not what I could give them and my love for the position came into question as I had worked in another field of work for so long. At this point it's starting to feel like recruiters put you straight into the "No"-pile as I've been unemployed for so long. I can hear the doubt and disgust in the pause-of-silence when they ask what I've been doing since my last employment and answer "Looking for jobs". FML and the title of this thread is spot-on.
 

The Artisan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,960
if you're going to negotiate base salary, when would be the time to do it? would it be during the phone interview with the recruiter or during an offer?
 

Stalwart

Member
Feb 4, 2018
1,050
Been applying for jobs for almost six months and it feels totally hopeless. Been called to interviews and it seems great but they always end up picking someone with more experience (I only have my degree and working experience from a totally different field). There are always going to be someone who has more experience than I so how the hell am I ever going to get picked? Last interview I travelled back and forth for 12+h and the douche hadn't even prepared any specific questions and just adlibbed from my profile he had in front of him. Didn't get that job in the end because I apparently only showed what I wanted from the job but not what I could give them and my love for the position came into question as I had worked in another field of work for so long. At this point it's starting to feel like recruiters put you straight into the "No"-pile as I've been unemployed for so long. I can hear the doubt and disgust in the pause-of-silence when they ask what I've been doing since my last employment and answer "Looking for jobs". FML and the title of this thread is spot-on.
Don't tell them that, spin it into something that helps you more. Depending on what your field is or what you are applying for.
 

DrainedSpirit

Member
Mar 25, 2019
176
Don't tell them that, spin it into something that helps you more. Depending on what your field is or what you are applying for.
I do spin it and it may get me to an interview or a few steps down the recruiting-process but in the end it is not anywhere near relevant to the professional field for which I'm applying jobs so between my irrelevant working experience to someone's relevant working experience I'm always going to lose. In one interview the dude seemed to appreciate that I was not fresh off the boat but had experience from working life but in the end they again chose someone that had a bit more "relevant experience". This is despite me acing the psychiatric evaluation test, the interview and him specifically telling me that I gave good examples on valuable experiences and how I acquired them.

if you're going to negotiate base salary, when would be the time to do it? would it be during the phone interview with the recruiter or during an offer?
In my experience the recruiter mentions the salary-span for an initial ok but final negotiations on actual salary would be when you are picked and based on your personal work-experiences, specific knowledge, seniority etc.
 

Lakershead22

Member
Oct 27, 2017
581
Los Angeles, CA
Did I mess up? After having a phone interview with a potential employer on Monday of this week..they emailed me back asking for a face to face interview later this week or early next week. I scheduled the interview for Tuesday the 28th and now I'm wondering if it's too late. What do you think?
 

DrainedSpirit

Member
Mar 25, 2019
176
Did I mess up? After having a phone interview with a potential employer..they emailed me back asking for a face to face interview this week or early next week. I scheduled the interview for Tuesday the 28th and now I'm wondering if it's too late. What do you think?
If they were OK with booking that date why would it be too late? Sounds like it was the earliest of their stated time-span if anything.
 

RolandGunner

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,189
I’ve always heard that government jobs take longer to hear back from but what is a reasonable amount of time for a response?

I interviewed at a city government agency for an analyst position and felt it went amazing. The HR person told me the standard I would receive a response (call or email) depending on if I made it to the next stage. However, it has been 2 weeks and going on 3.

I sent a simple thank you follow up the next day of the interview but haven’t heard anything since.

I’m debating on calling and asking but at the same time don’t want to seem too pushy since I’ve always heard these positions take a while.
After two weeks I would definitely call or email. Sometimes jobs drop down the list of priorities. Its a good idea to remind the HR people about you. Worst case, they confirm you didn't get the job which sucks but at least you know.
 

PoppaBK

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
1,435
Been applying for jobs for almost six months and it feels totally hopeless. Been called to interviews and it seems great but they always end up picking someone with more experience (I only have my degree and working experience from a totally different field). There are always going to be someone who has more experience than I so how the hell am I ever going to get picked? Last interview I travelled back and forth for 12+h and the douche hadn't even prepared any specific questions and just adlibbed from my profile he had in front of him. Didn't get that job in the end because I apparently only showed what I wanted from the job but not what I could give them and my love for the position came into question as I had worked in another field of work for so long. At this point it's starting to feel like recruiters put you straight into the "No"-pile as I've been unemployed for so long. I can hear the doubt and disgust in the pause-of-silence when they ask what I've been doing since my last employment and answer "Looking for jobs". FML and the title of this thread is spot-on.
If you are getting interviews then they are interested. I would recommend creating a good story for why you are changing fields and as you have been out of work awhile you should incorporate that as well. Turn your negatives into positives. Your passion for the field you are applying for is why you left your old field maybe? Something along those lines.
Maybe also look for part time work in a field that is tangentially related to what you want to do.
 

LosDaddie

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,296
Longwood, FL
I’ve always heard that government jobs take longer to hear back from but what is a reasonable amount of time for a response?

I interviewed at a city government agency for an analyst position and felt it went amazing. The HR person told me the standard I would receive a response (call or email) depending on if I made it to the next stage. However, it has been 2 weeks and going on 3.

I sent a simple thank you follow up the next day of the interview but haven’t heard anything since.

I’m debating on calling and asking but at the same time don’t want to seem too pushy since I’ve always heard these positions take a while.
My wife manages a Civic Center for a local city, and the entire hiring process for her took almost 2mos


if you're going to negotiate base salary, when would be the time to do it? would it be during the phone interview with the recruiter or during an offer?
Any good recruiter will ask you / clarify the salary during the initial phone interview. Otherwise, you wait for the company to ask, or after the offer letter comes in.
 

water_tempo

Member
Oct 31, 2017
78
Ya man, apparently I am terrible at test taking. It sucks too because I actually enjoy civil litigation. But fuck me, the bar has just destroyed me.
It is a brutal test and you are right, some people just aren't good at test taking. I was lucky enough to take the essay test (which I am much better at), but I have 0 doubt in my mind that I would never have passed the multiple choice version my state switched to the next test cycle.

Been applying for jobs for almost six months and it feels totally hopeless. Been called to interviews and it seems great but they always end up picking someone with more experience (I only have my degree and working experience from a totally different field). There are always going to be someone who has more experience than I so how the hell am I ever going to get picked? Last interview I travelled back and forth for 12+h and the douche hadn't even prepared any specific questions and just adlibbed from my profile he had in front of him. Didn't get that job in the end because I apparently only showed what I wanted from the job but not what I could give them and my love for the position came into question as I had worked in another field of work for so long. At this point it's starting to feel like recruiters put you straight into the "No"-pile as I've been unemployed for so long. I can hear the doubt and disgust in the pause-of-silence when they ask what I've been doing since my last employment and answer "Looking for jobs". FML and the title of this thread is spot-on.
I know you talked about this in subsequent posts, but I already quoted this one. Spinning it is good and it is great doing that is helping you get in the door for the interviews. There really isn't any great advice for pushing past people with more experience, which sucks. Have you taken any steps toward whatever this new job/field is? Like taken any courses in the last few months, done any personal projects you can show off, etc? That can maybe help bridge the gap a little bit and give a recruiter that likes you more of a reason to go to bat for you.

if you're going to negotiate base salary, when would be the time to do it? would it be during the phone interview with the recruiter or during an offer?
I also think this might have been answered by someone else, but I wouldn't bring it up until you've been given a conditional offer of employment. We post our jobs with a range that is the minimum-max(cap). We (and every employer) want you to start at the minimum. It is totally reasonable to ask about that when you get the call for the job. Just ask what the starting is, ask what the process for negotiating is or if there is room for it, then you can buy yourself some time or push ahead by either saying 1. okay, thank you for that information, I'm really excited about this opportunity and I will review this offer and get back to you by XX number of days... then you can come back to them with a number that you need to make it worth it to you. I'd recommend trying to get information about paid time off, benefits costs, and retirement options, because you should calculate that as part of your compensation, too. or 2. if you already know you wont take the job for less than a certain amount, just say you've already done the background and that you would appreciate if they would consider matching $XX, because you know that is what you need.
I'm a more passive person and very timid, so I would chose the first option because it gives me less anxiety, but if you know you can't take the job for less than a certain hourly amount (regardless of benefits and all the other stuff) it doesn't make much sense to beat around the bush. You can always say you still want to consider there offer and you will let them know by the next day to let both sides think about it.


After two weeks I would definitely call or email. Sometimes jobs drop down the list of priorities. Its a good idea to remind the HR people about you. Worst case, they confirm you didn't get the job which sucks but at least you know.
I actually quoted the most current reply to something! go me! Yeah, I would definitely reach out to the HR person. Government is slow, but local government should be the fastest of the bunch.
 

Aldi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,401
United Kingdom
Something amazing has happened. After 2 weeks of no contact all 3 jobs I interviewed for have offered me a position. And one of them has called back and increased there offer when I told them I was going to make a decision....

Im going out to celebrate. Good luck guys with your job hunts.
 
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Namorange

The Fallen
Oct 31, 2017
2,620
I ended up not taking the offer I was given a few weeks ago. It felt wrong and I am not really regretting it. I know a colleague working there right now and he described it as a stressful
environment. It’s not that I am looking for an easy job but he described the team as incredibly distributed and rather stubborn in adapting to a new development work-flow.

It felt wrong in my gut and that’s the way I went and it looks like I made the right decision. If I can get one offer of a decent increase to my current salary, then I can get another.
 

FreezeSSC

Member
Oct 27, 2017
665
Just had my first screen call from a job I applied to, I felt like I answered all their questions correct, but also word vomited. I haven't interviewed in over 9 years and I just got so nervous, fortunately it was over the phone so they couldn't see my face turning red but yeah, definitely wasn't expecting myself to do that and really hope I didn't come off as a nut job.
 

Davilmar

Member
Oct 27, 2017
883
Got hired, and recently quit a position after two months. Back on this miserable job search, and I'm honestly just considering quitting and working minor temp jobs. It's a giant waste of my time just even trying to send applications and trying to go for interviews.
 

DirtyLarry

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,498
I do not post much in this thread as well, it is fairly depressing to do so.

Almost a year ago, June 6th, I was unceremoniously let go from my employer of 8 years. They are a Fortune 50 company. Meaning they are very big.
I had a very weird hybrid role there that was somewhat IT, somewhat design/Art Director. It was a very specialized role unique to the company itself. It did not prepare me for life outside the company.
Now I admit, I took a little too much time off thanks to a generous severance package, however I decided to pursue finally trying to be what I went to school so many years back. An Illustrator. I had a little success. Adobe even featured some of my stuff over the year which was nice of them. But it was just the classic "artists exposure." Nothing led to any real paying jobs and way to many more "work for exposure" gigs that it appears way to many artists agree to these days. The little money I was making was nowhere near enough to make anywhere close to the salary I was making at a full time job.

So about 6 months ago I decided it was time to find a job again.
Perhaps I knew how difficult it would be subconsciously and that is what made me so hesitant to start.
Perhaps it was the fact that historically speaking I never had any issues finding work and I foolishly thought it would not be a problem.
Well reality has hit me hard these past few months.

Fast forward to later today.
I have an in person interview at the company I was let go from.
In the division I started at within the company but I left about 3 years ago to go to corporate headquarters.
This time around though I will be a 3rd party contractor. I will not be a full time employee of the company as I used to be.
They also only need me for 3 days a week.
However the hourly rate is substantially higher than what I was making when I was a full time employee. If I worked 5 days a week at this new position, I would be making approximately 30% more per year. As it stands if I work the 3 days a week, I will be making around 10% less than I was when I was last employed as a full time employee.
Big America Corporate at its finest right there.

That last part is not ideal, but I figure I can hustle some side gigs on the 2 days I have off and make that extra 10% elsewhere. Hell, I could even drive Uber if need be and probably come close.
Or I can just scale back the lifestyle I became accustomed to prior to losing my job. I have already done so the past year and I realized I spent money on a lot of materialistic shit I did not need whatsoever. At the very least it has been eye opening to let me know what one actually needs versus what one just simply desires. At this point in time I just want to pay my mortgage. As I have about a month or two of payments left before I have to dip into the little savings I do have.

Needless to say I am hoping this interview goes well and I get the position. Especially since I have been on several interviews over the past few months and nothing has panned out.

This shit has not been easy to say the very least.
 

water_tempo

Member
Oct 31, 2017
78
As it stands if I work the 3 days a week, I will be making around 10% less than I was when I was last employed as a full time employee.
Big America Corporate at its finest right there.

...

Or I can just scale back the lifestyle I became accustomed to prior to losing my job.
For the first part, not to kick you while you are down, but it will probably be even less, unless you are factoring in all of the benefits (medical, pto, retirement, etc.) you received as a regular employee. I only mention it because 1, america is truly awful in regards to how employees are treated and what corporations do to cut costs at the workers' expense, and 2, it ties into that part about scaling back your lifestyle.

Only you can decide how you want to live and what you want to do with your money. A lifestyle change won't stick if you don't want it to happen. I am sure you are aware, but if you need to make up some of those benefits you are missing out on (and have been missing out on) you will likely want to scale back accordingly. Younger workers (not sure how old you are, just speaking generally) tend to ignore all of those extra benefits because it is tough enough just to get by, but it is important to be aware of those things as they have a real cost to your life over the long term. You actually sound like you've done a great job if you've been out of work for a while and won't be dipping into savings until now, so you probably have this figured out. I've mentioned before on here, I see a lot of people just look at hourly amounts (which is important), but ignore the long-term (completely understandable when you've got bills to pay).

I hope the interview goes well. Hopefully, you get it and that will allow you to pursue only paying art commissions, since you can afford to turn away those unfortunate "exposure" deals.
 

DirtyLarry

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,498
For the first part, not to kick you while you are down, but it will probably be even less, unless you are factoring in all of the benefits (medical, pto, retirement, etc.) you received as a regular employee. I only mention it because 1, america is truly awful in regards to how employees are treated and what corporations do to cut costs at the workers' expense, and 2, it ties into that part about scaling back your lifestyle.

Only you can decide how you want to live and what you want to do with your money. A lifestyle change won't stick if you don't want it to happen. I am sure you are aware, but if you need to make up some of those benefits you are missing out on (and have been missing out on) you will likely want to scale back accordingly. Younger workers (not sure how old you are, just speaking generally) tend to ignore all of those extra benefits because it is tough enough just to get by, but it is important to be aware of those things as they have a real cost to your life over the long term. You actually sound like you've done a great job if you've been out of work for a while and won't be dipping into savings until now, so you probably have this figured out. I've mentioned before on here, I see a lot of people just look at hourly amounts (which is important), but ignore the long-term (completely understandable when you've got bills to pay).

I hope the interview goes well. Hopefully, you get it and that will allow you to pursue only paying art commissions, since you can afford to turn away those unfortunate "exposure" deals.
All very fair points. I am older compared to most of the members here. I am 44. I do believe this has directly correlated to why it has been so difficult to find employment but that is another discussion.
Fortunately I am and have been under my wife's insurance for medical. So that is covered.

Unfortunately you are indeed correct about everything else. With PTO I am hoping since I get to choose the 3 days a week I am able to work, I do not need to take many personal days at all. It will still suck though, and obviously there will also be no paid vacation. So that does suck. No doubt about it.

So the real issue is my 401k / retirement plan. I will have to figure out a plan of attack there, so it does indeed mean I will be making even less money as I will be contributing to it myself. My initial thought is what side work I can hustle on the 2 days (and weekends) I have free), anything I make from doing that would go to said plans. Not sure how feasible it is and we will have to sit down with our financial advisor, but a plan will be made somehow.

But you are indeed correct. Overall it will be even less. However even less is better than nothing.

I also happen to believe once you have a job it is much easier to find a new job. It has always been this way for me. The best job offers I have ever had came while I was working elsewhere. As such I am simply viewing this opportunity as a stepping stone to get back to making enough money to pay my mortgage without worrying about it and hoping something better, i.e. something that gives me everything else I will be missing out on, comes along sooner rather than later. I have already triple checked it and even though I will be on a contract, all I need to do is give 2 weeks notice and I can break said contract.

Also the lifestyle thing it is really quite simple from my end. I was purchasing things, mainly technology related items such as TV's and home theater items and consoles, etc. etc., that I simply did not need. I spent money on them because I had the money to spend but none of them, and I truly mean none of them, were essential to living a fulfilling life. It took this experience to realize this and if there is one thing to be fortunate about from this whole experience of being unemployed, this lesson is it. As shitty as this has been, I am grateful for the fact it help put things in perspective for me and I consider it a valuable life lesson that will be part of me moving forward regardless of how much money I make. I fell victim to consumerism. I feel like a true idiot for doing so. So it is not so much a lifestyle change as it is an awakening. It will be easy to stick to as it is now ingrained in my core being. I feel very fortunate I was able to arrive to this conclusion. I wish others could realize it too, but speaking from experience I know it is something plenty of people can tell you but only you can ultimately realize it is correct.

I feel like the interview actually went extremely well. But I also know you just never know. I have been on a few interviews this past month though and I knew as I was walking out they did not go well. I do not have that feeling with this one, so I am hopeful it may pan out as it will afford me some breathing room to think about my next career move.
 

Siyou

Member
Oct 27, 2017
287
So I landed a job as a ramp agent, at my local airport... but it turns out my negligence to ask what the pay is, has me finding out that the job is minimum wage ($9.45/hr), and has split shifts Monday - Wednesday. I'm slated for 21 hours a week, with intervals of 3-hour shifts; 8:30am-11:30am then 4:00pm-7:00pm. All I can say is, for the amount of red tape I had to go through as well as the amount of compliance I'll be having, doesn't minimum wage seem, astoundingly low?? I have nearly 50 training modules to complete within the month, but the job just doesn't feel... Worth it? It feels bad knowing I could work fast food for more, and have steady shifts. Some of the people who work there have expressed concern in regards to Delta Airlines being bought out, and currently 3 of the people (including my trainer and my head manager) are out to other airports due to staffing shortages.

So given everything stated, I've gone in for 2 days so far, would you continue to do this job?
 

Altera

Member
Nov 1, 2017
1,697
As a recent graduate, I feel the same. At this point I feel like I've applied to all the jobs I'm even kind of qualified for that are anywhere nearby.

Regarding linkedin, anyone have any advice on what I can change my headline to? it's currently student, but since that's no longer true and I'm unemployed, I have no idea what to change it to.
 

Jzeero

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,615
California
As a recent graduate, I feel the same. At this point I feel like I've applied to all the jobs I'm even kind of qualified for that are anywhere nearby.

Regarding linkedin, anyone have any advice on what I can change my headline to? it's currently student, but since that's no longer true and I'm unemployed, I have no idea what to change it to.
Most unemployed people put what they're looking for. "Recent graduate pursuing a career in photography" blah blah
 

Cadette

Member
Oct 30, 2017
38
Regarding linkedin, anyone have any advice on what I can change my headline to? it's currently student, but since that's no longer true and I'm unemployed, I have no idea what to change it to.
“Recent graduate from [School]” would be totally acceptable. Throw in your degree or field of study in there somewhere as well if you like.

Edit: Jzeero beat me to it.
 

N.Domixis

The Fallen
Oct 28, 2017
6,256
Took me 4 interviews and nailed the 4th one. Now my salary will have quadrupled. Applied to like 30 positions.
 

Altera

Member
Nov 1, 2017
1,697

Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,281
Man, it sucks reading about the perfect job designed to fit exactly my skills and passion, for a small company that I want to work for, that I think I could really help the company, and then never hearing back from them after applying.
 

water_tempo

Member
Oct 31, 2017
78
Man, it sucks reading about the perfect job designed to fit exactly my skills and passion, for a small company that I want to work for, that I think I could really help the company, and then never hearing back from them after applying.
How long has it been? What method did you apply by? Do you have the contact of a specific person? Don't be afraid to politely reach out and say how you applied and inquire if the position was filled.
 

keku

Member
Apr 23, 2019
8
Venting a little bit... been job hunting in Barcelona for 3 months after getting fired for bullshit reasons from a marketing internship. I'm here getting an MBA and have a student visa so I can only apply for internships. I have 12 years of experience, last was procurement IT specialist for ExxonMobil.

Every job I want I can't cause of my visa, and I get rejected all the time for being over qualified for an internship, even tho I would work on anything for money. Got an interview on monday tho, wish me luck
 

Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,281
How long has it been? What method did you apply by? Do you have the contact of a specific person? Don't be afraid to politely reach out and say how you applied and inquire if the position was filled.
Well, the last one (that I *really* wanted) I applied at an email listed at their website as per the instructions, then two weeks later direct-messaged the founder of the company on LinkedIn about it (she was the one who had posted about the job, on LinkedIn, and said to apply from the website). Never heard back from either one, its been two months now since the DM.

I applied for another job at a small company just this Monday, haven't heard back yet. Big corporations that's normal - I applied at Nintendo once, they got back to me 4 months later (the day after I had accepted a job in another state and begun arranging relocation). But for a small startup that isn't advertising on huge sites liked Indeed, you generally hear back pretty quickly.
 

Switch Back 9

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,157
Had a bite on Tuesday for a job, spoke to the woman and sent some work samples in. She said she appreciated the quick reply and would get back to me Friday.

It's now noon on Friday and I haven't heard anything. Should I send a "just touching base" email or wait it out?
 

LosDaddie

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,296
Longwood, FL
Something amazing has happened. After 2 weeks of no contact all 3 jobs I interviewed for have offered me a position. And one of them has called back and increased there offer when I told them I was going to make a decision....

Im going out to celebrate. Good luck guys with your job hunts.
Awesome! Congrats!

We should be assigned jobs by the government.
What kind of jobs do you think the Trump Administration would assign minorities? 🤔


As a recent graduate, I feel the same. At this point I feel like I've applied to all the jobs I'm even kind of qualified for that are anywhere nearby.

Regarding linkedin, anyone have any advice on what I can change my headline to? it's currently student, but since that's no longer true and I'm unemployed, I have no idea what to change it to.
Headlines don’t really matter. Recruiters are lazy (very lazy, in fact) and are searching via keywords.

You need to put the names of software and companies you’re working for. Or search the company you want to work for, and connect with their recruiters.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,048
Ireland
I'm not too certain as to what to do with my career at the moment so I'm hoping somebody here would be able to offer some advice.

Background and details on my current role:
I'm currently working as a data scientist in a Big Four consulting firm having done a Bachelors in Mathematics. I only started last year in an entry-level position, however my time in the position has gone very successfully and I'm in very good standing with the management team so have been given a lot of responsibilities which typically aren't handled until later in one's career (one of three lead developers on a large-scale automation project which I've been presenting to partners in offices across Europe as I'd a significant role in the project, simultaneously managing five projects, working with two others to develop a team learning initiative, created and now editor for the practice's newsletter, doing projects across pretty much all of the software we use [Alteryx, R, SQL, Python, IIS7, VBA, Tableau; front-end development is pretty much the only thing I've not done], and won two awards for my work), however not only do I really not like the nature of the work but I highly dislike the corporate culture and the pay is pretty poor in comparison to other companies (particularly when the two other lead developers on the large automation project are many levels above me but are doing a similar level of work with fewer active projects). My only previous substantial experience consists of working in Apple during university in a support role.

Originally, I'd intended on leaving the position now to complete a PhD as I managed to get funding for one last year but turned it down for the position, however I was unsuccessful in acquiring funding this year. I've strongly considered going back to university to do a Masters in Computer Science (I wanted to do a Masters in Maths as a route towards a PhD, but that masters is considerably more expensive and I'm worried I wouldn't be able to get into a PhD at the end of it) but looking at the course list not only have I already acquired quite a lot of experience in most of the modules which are offered via work (making me skeptical as to how much new material I'd learn) but it's a pretty significant amount of money which I'm not entirely certain I'd be able to afford. I'm not sure how much of a benefit the course would be as although I'd get a qualification, my fear is that I'd come out of the course in a similar position to where I am now.

I've been applying for data science positions in tech companies on LinkedIn, but have been unsuccessful so far in landing an interview and I'm worried that my lack of years of experience combined with only having a Bachelors is holding me back from a role in a tech company (I've had offers from financial companies, but I don't want to go somewhere with a similar corporate environment to my current position). I'm not sure if I should continue applying and try to brush up my CV a bit, or if going back to university would be wise.

Given the above, I'm wondering if anybody would have any suggestions as to whether I should go back to university, continue applying to other positions, or if I should just hold out where I am (even though I hate it)?
 

nitric0

Member
Feb 14, 2019
14
Can anyone talk about their experience when they were applying for SE/Dev internships? What the interviews were like?
 

Dany1899

Member
Dec 23, 2017
1,283
I'm not too certain as to what to do with my career at the moment so I'm hoping somebody here would be able to offer some advice.

Background and details on my current role:
I'm currently working as a data scientist in a Big Four consulting firm having done a Bachelors in Mathematics. I only started last year in an entry-level position, however my time in the position has gone very successfully and I'm in very good standing with the management team so have been given a lot of responsibilities which typically aren't handled until later in one's career (one of three lead developers on a large-scale automation project which I've been presenting to partners in offices across Europe as I'd a significant role in the project, simultaneously managing five projects, working with two others to develop a team learning initiative, created and now editor for the practice's newsletter, doing projects across pretty much all of the software we use [Alteryx, R, SQL, Python, IIS7, VBA, Tableau; front-end development is pretty much the only thing I've not done], and won two awards for my work), however not only do I really not like the nature of the work but I highly dislike the corporate culture and the pay is pretty poor in comparison to other companies (particularly when the two other lead developers on the large automation project are many levels above me but are doing a similar level of work with fewer active projects). My only previous substantial experience consists of working in Apple during university in a support role.

Originally, I'd intended on leaving the position now to complete a PhD as I managed to get funding for one last year but turned it down for the position, however I was unsuccessful in acquiring funding this year. I've strongly considered going back to university to do a Masters in Computer Science (I wanted to do a Masters in Maths as a route towards a PhD, but that masters is considerably more expensive and I'm worried I wouldn't be able to get into a PhD at the end of it) but looking at the course list not only have I already acquired quite a lot of experience in most of the modules which are offered via work (making me skeptical as to how much new material I'd learn) but it's a pretty significant amount of money which I'm not entirely certain I'd be able to afford. I'm not sure how much of a benefit the course would be as although I'd get a qualification, my fear is that I'd come out of the course in a similar position to where I am now.

I've been applying for data science positions in tech companies on LinkedIn, but have been unsuccessful so far in landing an interview and I'm worried that my lack of years of experience combined with only having a Bachelors is holding me back from a role in a tech company (I've had offers from financial companies, but I don't want to go somewhere with a similar corporate environment to my current position). I'm not sure if I should continue applying and try to brush up my CV a bit, or if going back to university would be wise.

Given the above, I'm wondering if anybody would have any suggestions as to whether I should go back to university, continue applying to other positions, or if I should just hold out where I am (even though I hate it)?
Hi, I don't know if I have enough experience to provide you good suggestions (I suppose were are around the same age, also), but since in the past you helped me I will write about what I think (since I am graduating in Computer Engineering) and what I saw from some of my colleagues who already started to work and are going to get a position in a tech company at the end of the year. What I will say applies to my contry (Italy) of course, so I don't know the actual situation of your contry, but if you are in Europe I imagine it is more or less the same.

First of all, a Master's is evalued much more than a Bachelor's financially speaking. I immediately provide you an example. A friend of mine, who started to work part-time after finishing the Bachelor's while studying full-time for the Master's, got around 800/1000€ per month (1400€ if full-time); as soon as he graduates (in October) in the Master's, he will get around 1900/2000€. This company considers the graduation score, in that case 2000€ is for summa cum laude (which is his case), but there is immediately a difference of 500€ between Bachelor's and Master's.
Moreover, several companies explicitely look for people who at least a Master's (and also PhD programs; in the university I am graduating, without a Master's it is possible to apply to a PhD program only if a Master's is achieved before the beginning of the program, i.e. maximum 2-3 months after the appliance).
For this reasons, I think that getting a Master's could be a good decision, because it would open many other possibilities and it would be an added value for the interviews.

On the other hand, getting a Master's would mean to afford the studies for at least other two years. Besides, it really depends on what you would like to do, after the Master's. Do you want to try again to apply for a PhD program (which, I think, is something you would like the most, after all)? In that case, a Master's in Maths would be perfect, or even better, a Master's in Data Analytics - starting from next year, in my university this new Master's course will be available, for example, and I think it would perfectly suit your interested, so maybe also in other countries similar Master's will be available in the near future. It would be the perfect path to get a PhD position in the subjects you are interested in. On the other side, if you decided to work in the industry, then a Computer Science Master's is a good idea: developers, computer engineers and generally people who know how to use programming languages are so researched nowadays and also well-paid. Considering your background, maybe it could be not so useful for you in terms of acquired knowledge, but it would represent the perfect qualifications to get a better job position.

To sum up (even though giving a final suggestion is always difficult), it really depends on what you would really like to do in the long terms. If you still hope in a PhD position, I would suggest you to search for a Master's in Math/Data Science/Data Analytics and, as soon as possible (after the first year of exams), to get in touch with a professor who would be available to be your thesis supervisor and potentially your PhD supervisor. Then, about a job position, instead, you clearly admitted that you hate your current job, despite from reading your background it seems quite solid and you are performing also really well (which is admirable in my opinion, being successful in something which you don't like must not be easy at all!). So at least you should continue to send your CVs to other companies and, if you get some replies where they say they require a Master's, well, at that point I would suggest you to go for it - Computer Science or Math, according to your financial possibilities.

Then, there are many other factors I didn't considered (do you want a family in the near future?, for example), but I assumed that you just want to be in some places you really like. And, again, since I think you would like to re-try a PhD (or at least to get a second change), a Master's is a good choice in my opinion. You could consider to do it part-time, too, but this really depend on people - some of the my colleagues worked part-time and did the Master's part-time, others worked part-time and did the Master's full-time, most of course didn't work (in my case, I collaborated with the university as a laboratory assistance, plus some private lessons). And, maybe, in your case, if you decide to start a Master's, I suppose you would like to end it as soon as possible.

I hope to have helped you at least a bit (and not having creates you other doubts!), maybe others can also give you your opinions if they have experience in returning to the università after a job in the industry, since I only gave you my opinion as a "outsider", let's say :)
 

JeTmAn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,687
Applied for several jobs last week, got rejection emails from two and nothing from the others. I'm in that depressive job-applying cycle with y'all, now!
 

johancruijff

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,063
Italy
my now former boss is a moron and in less than 6 months he succeeded in folding the company
so i guess i'll sit my ass in here for the summer
 

nevercomehome

Member
Oct 25, 2017
254
So... a bit of an odd question but... what's the over under on getting a job and then immediately going on the job hunt again? Long story long; not sure if my new job is for me. I had to move across state for it (i'm crashing at a friend's house so no lease commitments) and the area is hella expensive. I make alright money and i'd be scraping by in a studio apartment by the looks of it.

On top of this a nice looking position has opened up at a university in my hometown. Better pay, the area is way cheaper, and the commute wont make me wanna zone out and crash. Now, I am gonna apply for it and i'm not even gonna bother with putting the new job on the resume. I'm just gonna use the same resume and references that got me the job I just got but should I mention my situation in my cover letter? I was thinking I would mention that my new job may not be a right fit for me and I would like to take my services elsewhere.

Anyone have any experience with this situation? Any tips?
 

Katamari

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
339
I received a rejection letter today. This was the third time I received a rejection after making it to the final interview. I am very frustrated. I hate interviewing since it takes so much time.

The last interview I had to work on a case and a presentation that took 8 hours. Then present it to 6 people, followed by 6 one-on-one interviews. The previous interview was also 6 one-on-one interviews. It’s ridiculous what employers make you go through for a job knowing how desperate people are.

I almost want to quit. At this point all I am doing is helping other people land jobs.
 

Aldi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,401
United Kingdom
I received a rejection letter today. This was the third time I received a rejection after making it to the final interview. I am very frustrated. I hate interviewing since it takes so much time.

The last interview I had to work on a case and a presentation that took 8 hours. Then present it to 6 people, followed by 6 one-on-one interviews. The previous interview was also 6 one-on-one interviews. It’s ridiculous what employers make you go through for a job knowing how desperate people are.

I almost want to quit. At this point all I am doing is helping other people land jobs.
Hang in there and keep going. At least your getting the experience and although you may not think it you'll be better for any future presentations/interviews.

I've had long drawn out situations that have required multiple interviews, Skype interviews and presentations and when you get rejected it sucks, but after all the rejection something clicked, i started to be more laid back and relaxed during the process and now I've been in a great position where I've been offered multiple positions.
 

ryan299

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,104
Scored an interview for tomorrow. Recruiter told me only 1 or 2 others are interviewing and that they seem to really like my background. Wasnt nervous before that. Hoping i dont get cocky bc i seem to be the front runner lol
 
Last edited:

SnugTeam6

Member
Oct 25, 2017
488
United States
Man, it sucks reading about the perfect job designed to fit exactly my skills and passion, for a small company that I want to work for, that I think I could really help the company, and then never hearing back from them after applying.
God, I feel you. Applied to the same kind of thing over a month ago. Even followed up again with a note saying I'm still passionately interested. Literally nothing but just an auto-reply when I originally submitted everything. It sucks.
 

PoppaBK

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
1,435
I'm not too certain as to what to do with my career at the moment so I'm hoping somebody here would be able to offer some advice.

Background and details on my current role:
I'm currently working as a data scientist in a Big Four consulting firm having done a Bachelors in Mathematics. I only started last year in an entry-level position, however my time in the position has gone very successfully and I'm in very good standing with the management team so have been given a lot of responsibilities which typically aren't handled until later in one's career (one of three lead developers on a large-scale automation project which I've been presenting to partners in offices across Europe as I'd a significant role in the project, simultaneously managing five projects, working with two others to develop a team learning initiative, created and now editor for the practice's newsletter, doing projects across pretty much all of the software we use [Alteryx, R, SQL, Python, IIS7, VBA, Tableau; front-end development is pretty much the only thing I've not done], and won two awards for my work), however not only do I really not like the nature of the work but I highly dislike the corporate culture and the pay is pretty poor in comparison to other companies (particularly when the two other lead developers on the large automation project are many levels above me but are doing a similar level of work with fewer active projects). My only previous substantial experience consists of working in Apple during university in a support role.

Originally, I'd intended on leaving the position now to complete a PhD as I managed to get funding for one last year but turned it down for the position, however I was unsuccessful in acquiring funding this year. I've strongly considered going back to university to do a Masters in Computer Science (I wanted to do a Masters in Maths as a route towards a PhD, but that masters is considerably more expensive and I'm worried I wouldn't be able to get into a PhD at the end of it) but looking at the course list not only have I already acquired quite a lot of experience in most of the modules which are offered via work (making me skeptical as to how much new material I'd learn) but it's a pretty significant amount of money which I'm not entirely certain I'd be able to afford. I'm not sure how much of a benefit the course would be as although I'd get a qualification, my fear is that I'd come out of the course in a similar position to where I am now.

I've been applying for data science positions in tech companies on LinkedIn, but have been unsuccessful so far in landing an interview and I'm worried that my lack of years of experience combined with only having a Bachelors is holding me back from a role in a tech company (I've had offers from financial companies, but I don't want to go somewhere with a similar corporate environment to my current position). I'm not sure if I should continue applying and try to brush up my CV a bit, or if going back to university would be wise.

Given the above, I'm wondering if anybody would have any suggestions as to whether I should go back to university, continue applying to other positions, or if I should just hold out where I am (even though I hate it)?
Will your work not help pay for a master's that you can complete on evenings? Might be the way to go as you seem to have a good position and are progressing in your career currently.
 

Septimus Prime

EA
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
4,189
Can you find a better way to share that? I don't want to request permission using my personal account, and I'd wander neither do others.