Applying for jobs is exhausting and soul-crushing

SOLDIER

Member
Oct 26, 2017
6,000
Question: How much information about working with a company do you usually prefer to have before considering working with them?

Last week I got a call back from one of the positions I applied for, followed by an in-person interview. The short version is that it's a small office connecting to a massive warehouse for luggage, and my role would consist of administrative tasks like typing up printing labels, documents, and the possibility of updating the website and ads (they liked my freelance writing background in addition to my previous office work).

They said they'd let me know Friday about their decision, but it wasn't until today that I suddenly got a text message saying that they want to hire me. They want me to meet again on Thursday to finalize things.

I can't find much at all online about the company aside from their website. They did say they were a small startup company, and the people I spoke to seemed very nice. They emphasized that the office has a very chill, laid back atmosphere (the dress code is also pretty casual aside from no shorts), mostly run by Jewish owners who take Jewish holidays off. It's $13 an hour for the first month, then $15 after that with benefits. The commute is short (about 20 minutes), and I've already got aspirations that won't make this a permanent job for me (working on getting IT certified starting with A+, hopefully by the end of this month). Their hours seemed like standard full-time runs too (M-F, 8:30-5:30).

As it stands I'm seeing no reason to turn down this job offer, but I can't help but feel a bit paranoid since there's so little about the company. The most I was able to find was three Glassdoor reviews, two positive and one negative: the negative post claimed that they were forced to work unpaid overtime. I brought this up with the guy I spoke to and he laughed it off. I also made sure I wasn't required to do any outside sales or meet any kind of quota.

So far, it all sounds good. But considering I almost got suckered that same week into another job with a company that DID have a whole bunch of negative reviews (they weren't even planning to hire anyone, they just wanted to call folks over for 20 minutes while they peddle various insurance plans and such), I remain cautiously optimistic.
 
Oct 27, 2017
7,550
1. Good.
2. My attitude is the result of dealing with people like you for over 20 years.
3. You either want a resume that describes me or you dont. The layers and distractions to the hiring process just keep the bureaucratic elements even more impotent and useless, ie, less gets done, less people get hired that should be. Asking for more superfluous elements isnt going to change the fact that you're too lazy to read through a resume when it was your job.
You don't need to be such a fucking asshole about it. Here you've actually got two people who used to review resumes giving tips on what's most eye-catching and you're being hostile towards them rather than listening to the advice.

Having a minimal resume (we call them CVs in the UK) and including your LinkedIn where everything is laid out in much more detail actually seems like a really good idea.
 
Oct 28, 2017
5,160
Not if you never get to the interview. Remember, you're potentially missing out on overachievers because you cant care to read. It IS your job. That is WHY your time is valuable. If you're not using it to worthwhile extent or you cant handle the full responsibilities of your job, that's not on the person who is accurately describing themselves. The fact that shorter resumes mean your more likely to get an interview just screams to me why society is doomed.

Like, no shit you're going to get dumb as rocks employees when you cant even be bothered to read more than one page of a persons qualifications. That's completely on you as the hiring manager.

So sorry my entire life, education, and work history cant be summed up in a page?
I was able to fit my college education background, skills, four relevant jobs, and 2 projects all with details on a single page. Can you share what you are struggling to fit on one page? You’re really lashing out here, and it seems like it’s largely out of frustration. But you should try to take the advice to heart since it seems reasonable, even if it’s against what you expect.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,172
United States
I was able to fit my college education background, skills, four relevant jobs, and 2 projects all with details on a single page. Can you share what you are struggling to fit on one page? You’re really lashing out here, and it seems like it’s largely out of frustration. But you should try to take the advice to heart since it seems reasonable, even if it’s against what you expect.
I'm 35.
I have over 12 years of college in no less than 4 different majors, ranging from journalism to electricianship to sound design to medical, etc.
I have worked over 12 years in retail situations. I have worked in sweatshops. I have worked in real estate offices as admin staff. I have worked in weed dispensaries. I've worked in fields pollinating corn. I've been proofreading peoples masters thesis papers since I was ten years old. I know how to fly a plane. Ive worked I tutoring centers for children. I worked in a warehouse for a year and can use forklift. I have worked customer service for Verizon wireless at 4 am in the morning.
Now, if all of that sounds like a bullshit, jumble of a life, you would be right, but how else am I supposed to tailor all of that (and more, that's just off the top of my head) for every specific resume when I'm sending off more than ten a day, while still working full time hours in the job that is killing me? And when people cant even be asked to read more than a page, when it's their JOB? Theres absolutely no reason why I shouldn't be able to accurately describe my work experience just because someone is too lazy to read.

Yeah, I'm a little frustrated.
 
Oct 28, 2017
5,160
I'm 35.
I have over 12 years of college in no less than 4 different majors, ranging from journalism to electricianship to sound design to medical, etc.
I have worked over 12 years in retail situations. I have worked in sweatshops. I have worked in real estate offices as admin staff. I have worked in weed dispensaries. I've worked in fields pollinating corn. I've been proofreading peoples masters thesis papers since I was ten years old. I know how to fly a plane. Ive worked I tutoring centers for children. I worked in a warehouse for a year and can use forklift. I have worked customer service for Verizon wireless at 4 am in the morning.
Now, if all of that sounds like a bullshit, jumble of a life, you would be right, but how else am I supposed to tailor all of that (and more, that's just off the top of my head) for every specific resume when I'm sending off more than ten a day, while still working full time hours in the job that is killing me? And when people cant even be asked to read more than a page, when it's their JOB? Theres absolutely no reason why I shouldn't be able to accurately describe my work experience just because someone is too lazy to read.

Yeah, I'm a little frustrated.
Do I understand it right that you are applying for positions in retail? I’m not sure what level of retail you are applying for, but I think my thoughts would be the same for almost all levels, unless you’re trying to get a high level corporate job at a retail company. Many of these details seem irrelevant to a retail job. Why would a retail hiring manager care about them? What value does it provide them? And it will likely make you look overqualified. The problem with being overqualified is that you are a higher risk of leaving soon because you find a job better qualified for you.

You keep saying they are being lazy by not doing their job, but they are clearly doing their job and finding people that meet your needs. You need to bite the bullet and accept that these kids of jobs don’t care if you have a unique background of education and work history. Swallow your pride and cut out irrelevant stuff. They don’t need to know everything you’ve done. If you’re going to remain adamant and keep blaming them, then I’m afraid you’re likely going to remain unemployed for some time.
 

Stalwart

Banned
Feb 4, 2018
1,351
I got invited to an interview, when I googled the address I noticed it's a house? Seems weird yet they have a website with the same address and all. I will be emailing them to make sure but has anyone ever experience this?
 

Finaj

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,617
I'm having a hard time getting into a cycle/groove for applying to jobs. Unfortunately the place I have to apply for jobs is also the thing I spend time goofing off on (my computer).

Anyone have recommendations of what to do to get into a consistent habit of applying for jobs?
 
Nov 30, 2018
2,078
Secured a pretty nice gig as a security guard after applying forever everywhere. Been stuck at a lame job with low pay and no benefits. Snagged this one with much higher pay, free healthcare, double holiday pay or paid day if I’m off, and guaranteed full time.

Hopefully I’m able to get back to school with this since I couldn’t afford it before at $10/hr and 16 hours a week.
 

SOLDIER

Member
Oct 26, 2017
6,000
Yeah, so...I had mentioned previously how I was somewhat taken back by the casual way the aforementioned company texted me on a Sunday to let me know I was hired. I was set to meet them tomorrow and had texted again to confirm the appointment, everything seemed to still be on track.

Until one hour later, when I got another text back from the same person telling me that they decided that they didn't have the budget to hire a new employee. He expressed remorse and mentioned they would have loved to have me, adding a "bro" in there that honestly irritated me more than something more impersonally written.

That's not the first time I was hired for a job only for them to pull back at the last minute. It really fucking hurts, let me tell you.

On the upside, I am currently in contact with at least four different job offers from recruiters. All full-time positions too, though I have been called again from Univision for another brief stint (by brief I mean "two Saturdays"). Still holding onto hope that they offer me a permanent job. Surely I must be high on their list if this is the third time?
 

Dre3001

Member
Oct 28, 2017
687
background checks and credit checks are two entirely different things. I wouldn't panic about a background check unless you have a felony.

Credit check they're going to be pretty explicit about making clear that's what it is- and I rarely see these anymore outside of positions related to finance or positions that require a security clearance. The job listing will almost always mention it in advance as well.
I wouldn't worry about it, and as far as I know, they'll have to inform you if they're going to do a credit pull as part of the background check.

The score is one thing, but a history of debt collections, high debt, failure to pay, etc., can definitely sound alarms to some employers. As LosDaddie said, it makes sense for someone in banking, or any person in an information sensitive position since a bad financial situation may mark you as risk for fraud and bribery.
Late reply but thanks for the feedback. So for an update, I got a formal offer for this job. They are sending the paperwork and I have to complete the background check for it.

I have a clean record and the only blemish may be the poor credit. I had an issue with some CC accounts going to collections and a lot of missed payments. I managed to finally pay off all the collection accounts and catch up on payments very recently but obviously my credit hasn't recovered yet. Im hoping that the background check is only criminal or that if they do see it give me a chance to explain somehow.
 

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
15,299
So I left my job in September to take a consulting job. I'm really not liking my consulting job and I'm wondering if my old job would let me come back? I'm so nervous to even ask them.
 

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
15,299
Is it really a. Good idea to reach out to someone on LinkedIn after you’ve applied at their employer? I really want a job at this company so I applied and then I looked up the person who would be in a similar role as me and just checked to make sure they were still hiring.
 

daveo42

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,794
Ohio
So I think I might have made a mistake in choosing between two job offers. I've only been in my new role for two months and I'm realizing that while at least a portion of the work deals in some of the areas I'm familiar, most of the work I'm going to be doing in the next several months is triage in an system that I'm both not very familiar with and is about a decade older than modern database standards, if not more.

So I'm looking around again for something that actually fits my strengths, tho I'm not sure I'm going to find something that pays as well. Kind of wish I could go back a few months and take the other position at this point and just deal with a more conservative work culture.
 

horsebite

Member
Oct 27, 2017
335
USA
Haven't been in the job market for 7+ years, but recently got my hours cut because my boss was less than honest about what would go on once I moved overseas (plan was to continue working remotely...should have got that in writing). I feel for all of you struggling to even get an interview. I've applied for 30-some positions over the past few weeks and all I've received are two rejection emails; not even a call.

Really depressing shit that makes it tough to keep applying for positions you are very qualified for just to know you won't be contacted and all you've done is wasted your own time.
 

Netherscourge

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,009
Great article on Forbes that sounds like my situation...


Many employers these days are willing to wait a very long time to find a 100% perfect candidate, who is younger and has less professional experience, than one who is older and very experienced.

They want someone they don't have to pay a lot and who they don't have to train. Someone they don't have to invest in.
 
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LosDaddie

Attempted to circumvent ban with alt account
Banned
Oct 25, 2017
3,622
Longwood, FL
the article has some truth to it, sure.
But it’s not the absolute truth.

The older & more experienced candidate will almost always demand a higher salary. Sometimes a MUCH higher salary. Most companies have a salary range for the position that’s open.

A lot of older candidates are stuck in their ways...ie “I’ve always done it this way”. For example, I’m an Electrical PE and a few years ago most engineering firms started switching from AutoCAD to Revit for drafting software. The younger employees were more willing to learn the software, while the older ones (Who’ve been drafting with AutoCAD for years) hated it and complained all the time about it.

But I’ll tell you this, as a PM at my current firm, if I/we wait to find the perfect candidate, then we won’t meet our client’s needs and won’t get more work. So I’m willing to take chances on some candidates


So I left my job in September to take a consulting job. I'm really not liking my consulting job and I'm wondering if my old job would let me come back? I'm so nervous to even ask them.
The worst that can happen is that they say No.

Always ask yourself; “What’s the worst that can happen?”

This applies to many things in life.


Is it really a. Good idea to reach out to someone on LinkedIn after you’ve applied at their employer? I really want a job at this company so I applied and then I looked up the person who would be in a similar role as me and just checked to make sure they were still hiring.
Can’t hurt to ask, but unless they’re in HR, or it’s a tiny company, they probably can’t help.
 

mhayes86

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,780
Virginia
So I left my job in September to take a consulting job. I'm really not liking my consulting job and I'm wondering if my old job would let me come back? I'm so nervous to even ask them.
Week late quoting this, but for what it's worth, I have seen people return to a previous job several times. A guy on my team left a year ago and returned a few months ago. Sure it can feel embarrassing, but if you were a good employee and left on good terms, they'll welcome you with open arms since it's easier than training a new person and having them adjust to the culture. A good employer won't just ignore you by deeming you a flight risk.

As the person above said, the worse that can happen is they say no.
 

John Doe

Avenger
Jan 24, 2018
1,969
Has anyone ever been given work or research to do during an interview?

Is that a good or bad sign? I had a second interview at a place, with a different partner this time and he told me to do some research for something they're doing and submit it. Along with two other pieces of work I've done in the past.
 

Dalek

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
15,299
Week late quoting this, but for what it's worth, I have seen people return to a previous job several times. A guy on my team left a year ago and returned a few months ago. Sure it can feel embarrassing, but if you were a good employee and left on good terms, they'll welcome you with open arms since it's easier than training a new person and having them adjust to the culture. A good employer won't just ignore you by deeming you a flight risk.

As the person above said, the worse that can happen is they say no.
So it turns out that I did ask-but I was too late. They hired my replacement. They might be doing more hiring in 2020 and would let me know.
 

Deleted member 52407

User requested account closure
Banned
Jan 23, 2019
178
I'm in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and I've had 3 job offers, though they're not that great, so I rejected them. I'm starting to wonder if it were a mistake to do so?

1. Security Guard position scanning out employees (metal detector & handheld) $9/hr -- It doesn't pay enough and is too far (20 miles)
2. Construction Materials Technician -- It paid $14/hr but its very physically demanding and highly variable depending on the weather
3. Security Guard position scanning people in and out of an office setting. Some foot patrol. $12.50/hr -- It was too far away (25+ miles).

I've been looking for a job for about 3-4 weeks now and its still frustrating because all of them had a "fatal flaw" of sorts, so I'm wondering if I should have just taken them and dealt with those obstacles later, etc.

I have a BS, roughly four years of customer service experience, I can build and troubleshoot PC hardware and proficient with Office suite, but no body cares. They all demand work experience [that I don't have] like it can be plucked from a tree.

Its not the endless supply of menial jobs that pay meager wages that's most troubling for me. Its the fact that nobody cares about cultivating you unless you're already an industry vet.
 

rec0ded1

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,442
Great article on Forbes that sounds like my situation...


Many employers these days are willing to wait a very long time to find a 100% perfect candidate, who is younger and has less professional experience, than one who is older and very experienced.

They want someone they don't have to pay a lot and who they don't have to train. Someone they don't have to invest in.
Holy shit I'm worried this is me. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't worried being grey is starting to affect my chances. Thing is I've been grey since I was in my 20s and I own it. Can't see myself camouflaging It away :/
Mid-lifers need to rise up! *oof my back*
 
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Deleted member 55795

Alt-Account
Banned
Apr 9, 2019
116
Worked for a Retail/Telecoms company her in the UK for 9 years since I was 18. Moved up the ranks and become what’s known as a “Guru” a bullshit term for Retail Technical Expert. I decided to go for the Graduate Scheme and move into corporate but at the same time I was looking at moving into the Customer Success department for any Tech Firm in London.

Ended up getting a Job as a Customer Success Manager for a small SaaS firm in Soho which has its main office in San Fran .. I also scored the Graduate Role at the current job as well but decided to go with the Tech from to diversify my work portfolio.

After 12 months I’ve been made redundant and now I’m back on the job market doing interviews and what not. The worst bit as well is the Graduate scheme for my old company started in October. I could have accepted both jobs and still been in some form of Employment by now which is really a regret.

On the plus side my CV gets attention when I apply for jobs and at least get a Phone Screening call from 80% of the jobs I apply for. I’ve had a few interviews now and hoping something gets confirmed next week.
 

Cyborg009

Member
Oct 28, 2017
385
Man it sucks that universities take forever to get back to people. My friend had to wait for almost two months for a response back from them.
 

RedSwirl

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,359
Great article on Forbes that sounds like my situation...


Many employers these days are willing to wait a very long time to find a 100% perfect candidate, who is younger and has less professional experience, than one who is older and very experienced.

They want someone they don't have to pay a lot and who they don't have to train. Someone they don't have to invest in.
I've never found the evidence to back it up, but I feel like companies are trying to stick to the lower labor costs they managed to get to right after the financial crisis. Maybe that's how they've been able to keep profits up, which would kind of mask how the economy is really doing.
 

Damaniel

Banned
Oct 27, 2017
2,314
Portland, OR
The job I mentioned that I applied for back in September ended up going away - apparently the team was interested in offering me the position, but the company decided to outsource the entire (small) group to their eastern European division instead. I was definitely disappointed, but it least it wasn't a traditional rejection. I wish they had told me sooner though.

On the other hand, I was offered a job today as a senior software architect for a major automotive company, working on embedded applications for automotive computers. I'm really excited - I got to take a couple months off and decompress from the last few miserable years at my last job, and that old job will still be paying me until March.
 

MrHealthy

Member
Nov 11, 2017
501
Been trying unsuccessfully to get a job for the past seven months. Wasn't getting any interviews. Only a few companies even bothered to to send me rejection notices. I finally have an interview tomorrow. Unfortunately its at Walmart, but I gotta take the job at this point if they offer it. I feel like I have been pigeonholed into shitty retail positions. Even my more advanced merchandising skills don't seem to matter anymore and I can't find work in merchandising.
 

Deleted member 55795

Alt-Account
Banned
Apr 9, 2019
116
Worked for a Retail/Telecoms company her in the UK for 9 years since I was 18. Moved up the ranks and become what’s known as a “Guru” a bullshit term for Retail Technical Expert. I decided to go for the Graduate Scheme and move into corporate but at the same time I was looking at moving into the Customer Success department for any Tech Firm in London.

Ended up getting a Job as a Customer Success Manager for a small SaaS firm in Soho which has its main office in San Fran .. I also scored the Graduate Role at the current job as well but decided to go with the Tech from to diversify my work portfolio.

After 12 months I’ve been made redundant and now I’m back on the job market doing interviews and what not. The worst bit as well is the Graduate scheme for my old company started in October. I could have accepted both jobs and still been in some form of Employment by now which is really a regret.

On the plus side my CV gets attention when I apply for jobs and at least get a Phone Screening call from 80% of the jobs I apply for. I’ve had a few interviews now and hoping something gets confirmed next week.
Just wanted to update this. Was offered a Job at another tech firm today. This one is much bigger than the last and just did £200million in series a funding.

This position pays allot more than the last and is still in Central London which is great. Originally went for another Success role but they thought my skills where best applied in a Support Lead role.

It took me more than 4 years to leave my retail job and now it’s taken me less than a month to score another great job. Goes to show what a bit of experience can do.
 

Temascos

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,033
I've been working in the charity sector for nearly four years now between multiple jobs, having moved on from retail and customer service. I'm starting to feel empty and unfuffiled by the whole thing as I feel my work doesn't actually matter all that much and I'm not getting the flexibility I want to have. This is me being picky more than anything else mind you but I have no idea where to start looking. I hate upselling, and I want to run free, and sometimes I want a structured day where I meet people, I just can't decide.

Not the worst situation to be in but I feel like I'm in a rut.
 

nel e nel

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,688
I've never found the evidence to back it up, but I feel like companies are trying to stick to the lower labor costs they managed to get to right after the financial crisis. Maybe that's how they've been able to keep profits up, which would kind of mask how the economy is really doing.
In NYC the data shows that while unemployment rates in young adults have dropped since the 2008 recession, it’s counterbalanced by the fact that most of those jobs are either part time or low paying retail/service industry jobs.
 

jfkgoblue

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,625
So I have a unique situation I think. I graduate college in a little over a month and received two job offers, both very generous but I had to pick one. Anyways after I wrote the declination letter they wrote back asking “what can we do to make the offer better and have you come work for us?” How do I even answer that?
 

Brandino

Avenger
Jan 9, 2018
263
So I have a unique situation I think. I graduate college in a little over a month and received two job offers, both very generous but I had to pick one. Anyways after I wrote the declination letter they wrote back asking “what can we do to make the offer better and have you come work for us?” How do I even answer that?
Well, if you really want the job you accepted, you can counter with a pie in the sky offer and see if they take it.

Or you can ask for more than what the other place is asking, and then take that offer to the other place and see if they will match or beat.
 

jfkgoblue

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,625
Well, if you really want the job you accepted, you can counter with a pie in the sky offer and see if they take it.

Or you can ask for more than what the other place is asking, and then take that offer to the other place and see if they will match or beat.
I thought about doing the second one, but I’m a little nervous about burning bridges right as I start with the company
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,293
So I have a unique situation I think. I graduate college in a little over a month and received two job offers, both very generous but I had to pick one. Anyways after I wrote the declination letter they wrote back asking “what can we do to make the offer better and have you come work for us?” How do I even answer that?
Just counter for $10,000 more and see if they bite.
 

Tygre

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,132
Chesire, UK
I thought about doing the second one, but I’m a little nervous about burning bridges right as I start with the company
Every hiring manager expects candidates to negotiate and lets out a huge sigh of relief when they don't.

If you're not asking for more money, you are getting screwed. If they've offered you the job, they want you. If they've asked "what can we do to improve the offer" after you rejected them they really fucking want you.

Nobody will be offended if you ask them for more money, unless you're asking for something obviously dumb like double the offered amount, the worst they will do is tell you no. Be open, be humble, be honest. Don't try to be slick, don't play games
 

ryan299

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,422
Man I’m so conflicted. Looks like I’m going to get this job but I don’t want it. They want to bring me back for a third interview with the ceo who I was supposed to meet with today but he got stuck in meetings. Recruiter made it sound like they were ready to make an offer but now I gotta go back a third time.

That’s not the issue though. Issues are a lot of red flags were raised through both interviews. The job is 9-6 and the commute would be awful. Also title wise this is just a lateral move for me.

Problem I’m having is I know I don’t want the job but it’s a big salary bump and I know the only way I’ll get a raise from my cheap company is if I get another job. though given the salary of this new position they wouldn’t match it completely.

really conflicted here.
 

mhayes86

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,780
Virginia
Man I’m so conflicted. Looks like I’m going to get this job but I don’t want it. They want to bring me back for a third interview with the ceo who I was supposed to meet with today but he got stuck in meetings. Recruiter made it sound like they were ready to make an offer but now I gotta go back a third time.

That’s not the issue though. Issues are a lot of red flags were raised through both interviews. The job is 9-6 and the commute would be awful. Also title wise this is just a lateral move for me.

Problem I’m having is I know I don’t want the job but it’s a big salary bump and I know the only way I’ll get a raise from my cheap company is if I get another job. though given the salary of this new position they wouldn’t match it completely.

really conflicted here.
Is there any flexibility with the hours? If you're salary and just need to do your 8/day or 40/week, can you go in earlier and leave earlier? Are you forced to do an hour lunch which makes it a 9 hour day? How long would your commute be?

As for the interview, they may have some additional questions that they missed in previous interviews, or they have interviewed someone else and now you have competition, so one more interview to cement their choice.

Don't get too worked up about titles. In IT, I've seen the same titles used for different types of work, or the same titles at different levels that only mean more money based on your experience. Some places just invent new titles to fit someone in a seat. Sometimes you need a new job for that salary bump and opportunities to advance, otherwise complacency at your current job will hold you back.

Hours/commute can definitely be a concern, but what are some of the other red flags affecting your decision?


Would you submit a cover letter for a retail job?
Depends what the position is. If it's a lead/management position, I would. If it's a minimum wage position, I don't think there's any harm in it (I never have). It could make you stand out since submitting a cover letter is probably more effort than most people seeking that job would do.
 

ryan299

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,422
Is there any flexibility with the hours? If you're salary and just need to do your 8/day or 40/week, can you go in earlier and leave earlier? Are you forced to do an hour lunch which makes it a 9 hour day? How long would your commute be?
As for the interview, they may have some additional questions that they missed in previous interviews, or they have interviewed someone else and now you have competition, so one more interview to cement their choice.

Don't get too worked up about titles. In IT, I've seen the same titles used for different types of work, or the same titles at different levels that only mean more money based on your experience. Some places just invent new titles to fit someone in a seat. Sometimes you need a new job for that salary bump and opportunities to advance, otherwise complacency at your current job will hold you back.

Hours/commute can definitely be a concern, but what are some of the other red flags affecting your
No flexibility from what I’ve gathered on the hours. Commute is into NYC which coupled with those hours means I won’t be home long.

Red flags were they said they’re not very structured which worries me bc my company isn’t and it sucks. At least I know how to handle mine. Second is they’re looking for a new erp system which my company just went through and it was a nightmare. Just so many issues. I don’t want to go through that again after I just worked 4 months of hell due to it.

one more interview is due to having to meet with the ceo for final approval bc he approves every hire which is Fine though I find it odd as my position isn’t very high and easily replaceable if need be.
 
Oct 27, 2017
7,550
I've applied for a remote data analyst job which I'm a pretty good match for, but they want me to record a video or do a Powerpoint presentation to give some information on myself and answer 7 questions (What makes me stand out from the crowd, why I've applied to this company in particular, which of their team values I like the most, and that sort of stuff). I don't want to just repeat what's already on my application and I feel like I'm drawing a blank. I don't fancy recording a video as I hate myself on camera and I feel like I can articulate better in writing, but I don't know whether to make the Powerpoint pretty with images and stuff, or just keep it simple and factual. I'm guessing they're looking for something a bit more characterful but I don't know where to begin.
 

The Artisan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,839
I got a job offer from a startup company and I don't know if I should take it. I do but at the same time this means moving out from my parents' house since I work from home. Then again at my age, maybe that's something I need to do.
 

Gaf Zombie

The Fallen
Dec 13, 2017
1,291
I got a job offer from a startup company and I don't know if I should take it. I do but at the same time this means moving out from my parents' house since I work from home. Then again at my age, maybe that's something I need to do.
Are you saying you would have to work from home at the startup? Why couldn't you work at your parents' house?
 

The Artisan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,839
Are you saying you would have to work from home at the startup? Why couldn't you work at your parents' house?
At the company I'm at now I work from home in my parents' house. But this offer is not a work from home position so I'd have to start commuting, and I'd have to find a place of my own since the commute is really far from here.
 

Gaf Zombie

The Fallen
Dec 13, 2017
1,291
At the company I'm at now I work from home in my parents' house. But this offer is not a work from home position so I'd have to start commuting, and I'd have to find a place of my own since the commute is really far from here.
Gotcha. Yeah, that's a tough one. The difference between working from home and having to go into the office almost can't be overstated, especially in areas with heavy traffic or harsh winters. I'm sure you'll make the right decision for your circumstances but don't underestimate the value of no/low rent and not having to commute.
 

The Artisan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,839
Gotcha. Yeah, that's a tough one. The difference between working from home and having to go into the office almost can't be overstated, especially in areas with heavy traffic or harsh winters. I'm sure you'll make the right decision for your circumstances but don't underestimate the value of no/low rent and not having to commute.
Yeah, for sure. For the majority of the time I've worked for this company I have worked from home and I love that I get to work from home, but I hate telemarketing, which is what I do.

This is the NY area which means harsh winters and dependence on MTA. Also, I'm almost 30 years old, and even though I try to help my parents out financially, I should probably live on my own.