Are you glad or do you regret your higher studies?

How do you feel looking back at your higher studies

  • I regret what I studied

    Votes: 57 21.6%
  • I am glad/grateful for what I studied

    Votes: 158 59.8%
  • I’m neither regretful nor grateful for what I studied

    Votes: 49 18.6%

  • Total voters
    264

Volimar

volunteer forum janitor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,471
I didn't get much use out of my degree but I'm glad for the experience and for the education. Easier for me to say I guess since i didn't have to get student loans.
 

mute

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,073
I (eventually) got a job with my degree that I've been really lucky to have and have done well with it, so I can't regret things too much. I would still probably have done a lot of things different if I could go back and do it all over again. I was pretty burnt out of the whole thing by the end of it, and pretty jaded with the experience.
 

Ryan.

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
5,960
I don't regret what I am doing for my Masters, but I wish I would have done something else for my undergrad and not Information Systems. Towards the latter half of my undergrad I became more interested in marketing, public relations, and social media so I wish I would have gone the route of some sort of communications degree.
 

thewienke

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,658
I got a bachelors and masters in accounting because I went back to school in 2008 and needed something employable when the economy was in shambles.

I don’t regret it but I had zero desire to be a CPA about 3-4 years into the program when I heard what the work-life balance was like. That kinda put me in an awkward place career wise where I tend to do roles that are closer to finance than anything else.

Accounting and finance also suck because the experience required for different subcategories are highly specialized. You can’t switch from audit to tax to general accounting to underwriting to budgeting without a whole lot of difficulty and raised eyebrows despite having the basic skill set to do any of them.
 
Oct 28, 2017
1,430
I loved all of my studies.

I finished undergrad in 2006 with a degree in finance and economics; had a very successful financial career. Went to graduate school in 2017 because I wanted to use my love of logic to transition to machine learning/ai, and I'm loving it even more than finance (pay continues to be excellent as well.) No complaints. Graduate school was expensive but absolutely loved it; I made some life long friends there as well - we're all basically family.

My true love is science - particularly physics and astronomy - but it's too late for that now. I do study physics for fun, and am considering doing a PhD where I apply an algorithm that I came up with in graduate school into discovering new elementary particles.
 

3bdelilah

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,267
Both glad and regretful.

In hindsight I think I could've done something that benefits society more, as well as something that genuinely interests me. But on the other hand I can easily pierce through branding, PR, and other forms of marketing now, as well as seeing very clearly the dangers of mass consumerism that comes with that.
 

C.Mongler

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,776
Washington, DC
It opened doors for me because I had a degree on my resume. That's about it.

What I do for a living (web dev) I learned as a hobby in my downtime in college, though my newfound interest for it sprung off of a suuuper intro-level HTML section of a 101 New Media course I had to take as part of my degree; I have a degree in digital video that I basically never use. Idk, I guess I'm thankful for that too? But I also could have just plopped a couple thousand down from what I spent on tuition on a bootcamp course and been where I am (or even further honestly) in terms of practical knowledge, but I probably would have a much harder time finding a job without a degree.

Shit's weird.

The college experience was cool though, I liked that.
 

dred

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,130
I got a bachelor's in Mining Engineering which was a bit of a leap at the time because I didn't know anything about mining but 10 years after graduation I'm very happy with my choice. It's a fun, challenging field with a lot of variety and a good balance of office and field work which is just what I was hoping for. I changed jobs after 5 years and felt a bit of regret at that time because it was fairly tough to find another job but my new job has been great and it worked out for me for the most part.
 

Dead Guy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,800
Saskatchewan, Canada
I got a bio degree which has proved absolutely useless this far. Been out of school for 3 years and it hasn't helped me land one job, everything I've since done has not required a degree.

If I could do it again I would definitely go for computer science
 

jot

Member
Oct 25, 2017
984
Toronto
BA, History. I don’t use it in my work, but appreciated my time there and the skills I gained. Everything worked out.
 

ty_hot

Member
Dec 14, 2017
4,037
My PhD fucked me physically and mentally (not directly, obviously). I wish I had never started it and still need to finish it... I love the subject/thesis, so I am kind of glad still.
 

Reym

Member
Jul 15, 2019
293
I got an art degree. The fact that my art is terrible sorta makes it a waste by default.

That being said, I don't regret it at all. What else was I gonna do? It was a good stepping stone from school life to the "real" world and there were plenty of good experiences there. I don't regret the school I regret being me.
 

LGHT_TRSN

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,533
I do think my B.S. in Biology taught me some useful skills but the knowledge itself is useless in my career in IT. Wouldn't say I regret getting the degree, but I do have some regret about not getting a degree is something else instead.
 

DeusOcha

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,222
SoCal, US
Interesting. I got my AS in CS, tried to get my BS but I did so poorly this previous semester that my fear of not having no passion or interest in this major came to light. I tried to ignore this fear during my first two years but realizing that I failed my classes because I just couldn't care anymore made me switch. I'm now majoring into Environmental Science and minoring in Comparative Literature.

I just hope to God I like En Sci because if not, I don't know what to do in college.
The best advice I can give you and others who are going through or looking to go through university is go with whatever degree you're interested in but only if you're sure on what career paths that may come from it; do research, thoroughly. I wanted to do an English degree initially but shied away from it for Computer Science because I didn't do research on what an English degree would get me beyond teaching. It was only through going to job fairs hosted in campus during my junior/3rd year did I realize that the teaching abroad option was a career path all along I could've taken.
 

dmaul1114

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,796
Grateful for my MS and PhD as I’m now a tenured professor in a doctoral-granting department in my field and mostly love my job. Post-tenure there’s few things that can beat the flexibility in schedule and work focus (research topics etc.). It is well worth the trade off of a lower salary ceiling (superstars who continually land big grants aside) from private or government research jobs. Working with students, especially graduate students, is very rewarding as well.
 

Kanann

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,543
Studying world literature gave me free access to thousands of novel, novella, short stories.

Growing up more I know about project guttenberg, but still.

Philosophy was fun too.


Now at middle age, I want to study law and programi too but too lazy.
 

mddover

Member
Jan 9, 2019
22
Denton, Texas
I love my field, but there's so much uncertainty about whether I'll really be able to make a career out of it. I'm currently in that waiting period period where I've submitted applications to a few doctoral programs, and I'm checking my email constantly as I anxiously hope to hear back. And even if I make it in somewhere, there's the whole needing to produce good research and finding a job after I graduate thing, neither of which are sure bets.

So yeah, I guess I'm happy about my choices currently, although I suppose there's a dark timeline where it could become a source of massive regret and heartache for me if I hit a wall along the way.
 

Ogodei

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
8,736
Coruscant
Grateful, even if only like two of the classes I took actually contribute to the work I'm doing right now (maybe three because you really can't go wrong with Public Policy Analysis for a basic grounding in analytical thinking). I lament the decline of liberal arts education, you lead a richer existence for it.
 

harSon

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,625
Familiar with it? I was going to focus on mental health, and then possibly work for DVR to help the disabled get jobs or go to school. They did that for me and it inspired me.
Very much so. I have a Bachelors in Social Work, and Masters in Public Administration. I worked closely with the Department of Rehabilitation, which is the State of California equivalent of DVR. I worked with at-risk populations, mostly foster and gang impacted youth. I did a lot of work in workforce development though, and worked closely with organizations working with mental health and developmental disabilities - literally doing what you're hoping to do. I've since pivoted to policy and oversight, and don't do a whole lot of direct services these days. I absolutely love the line of work though, but I will admit, there's A LOT of people who ultimately burn out.

Non-profits are always on the lookout for volunteers, and while you won't be doing exactly what you're hoping to do career wise down the road, you can at least begin to feel out whether the career and population you're hoping to serve are a good fit for you by proxy.

Having said that, props on the career choice! I have unlimited respect for anyone who pursues a career in the service others, and I'm glad that you found inspiration to move in that direction :)
 

Nida

Member
Aug 31, 2019
1,446
Lynnwood, Washington
Very much so. I have a Bachelors in Social Work, and Masters in Public Administration. I worked closely with the Department of Rehabilitation, which is the State of California equivalent of DVR. I worked with at-risk populations, mostly foster and gang impacted youth. I did a lot of work in workforce development though, and worked closely with organizations working with mental health and developmental disabilities - literally doing what you're hoping to do. I've since pivoted to policy and oversight, and don't do a whole lot of direct services these days. I absolutely love the line of work though, but I will admit, there's A LOT of people who ultimately burn out.

Non-profits are always on the lookout for volunteers, and while you won't be doing exactly what you're hoping to do career wise down the road, you can at least begin to feel out whether the career and population you're hoping to serve are a good fit for you by proxy.

Having said that, props on the career choice! I have unlimited respect for anyone who pursues a career in the service others, and I'm glad that you found inspiration to move in that direction :)
This is incredibly helpful insight, thank you. I was dreading you saying "It was the worst experience of my life" at the end of that first sentence, haha.

I'm terrified about going back to school, and how late of a start I'm getting. But I think I had to be at this point in my life to realize having an impact on others lives is going to be infinitely rewarding.

I went to DVR thinking I'd get a customer service job somewhere, and do that for the rest of my life. I first went to school for networking, but became legally blind post Associate's degree. I went for that because I like computers and figured it was good money. But I look back now and realize I probably would have hated it.

Thinking about it, counseling, therapy, and social work would work well with my vision loss. I can record everything, and any writing I'd need to do I could do on the computer with my screen reader. And changing people's lives for the better is something the world needs right now.