Are you rich? Have you landed your dream job? If so, how did you do it?

Oct 27, 2017
13,377
I believe you call yourself rich when you never have to work again, never have to stress about bills, and can go anywhere you want on an unlimited budget (not so extreme you'd buy a yacht or jet or spend $10k an hour). I could stop playing poker and live a life of OK luxury, but I'd never do that.
Yeah, this is probably as close to it as you can get. When you basically make enough passive income that you don't actually have to hold a job and still do what you want
 

Jeronimo

Member
Nov 16, 2017
1,285
Anyone ever feel like they don't enjoy any kind of work and just all around depressed about this domain of life?
It depends on what you expect from work and what your work experience has been. For me, it's a means to an end. Not even in a negative way, but my work funds the rest of my life. I'm not actively looking for fulfillment or satisfaction from every single day at the office and I work in public service and mostly enjoy my job. I get that from contributing to future family and personal goals, from the time spent away from work, and the experiences and comforts it allows.

If I worked 12+ hour shifts doing manual labor or in a factory to just scrape by, I'd have a different perspective.
 

Aerogamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
398
I do well, I am happy with my station in life.

In terms of my job, a lot of you in about 2 years will hopefully start using something I designed a significant part of. :) That makes me happiest. I am a few levels away from my dream job though.
 

smoothj

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
687
Definitely not rich but my wife and I make enough to have everything we need or want.

For me, it's all a about perspective. I have a beautiful wife, life long friends, a loving supportive family, and barbeques on weekends with said friends and fam. Live in an awesome city. Honestly I don't need anything else. Maybe a kid in a year or two. Life is pretty damn good right now.

As for dream job.. probably not but I'm so efficient at it that it's practically stress free with lots of freedom to boot. No complaints here.
 

Monkeyball

Alt Account
Banned
Aug 19, 2018
725
Someone in this thread is actually posting pictures to prove the internet he has money? Hah.

This week I saw someone with his Ferarri parked right next to the terrace he was having a drink at, so he could see people drool over it. That's so sad.
 

Concelhaut

Member
Jun 10, 2019
501
No I don’t have my dream job because I figured out I’m not bright enough (Scientist)

I feel rich though even though I’ll make way less than my colleagues (future doctor)
 

Axelotl

Avenger
Oct 28, 2017
1,335
Hamm, Germany
My son of 4 months is perfectly healthy and awesome. MY wife is awesome. I don't have debt but savings. I have a good paying job with a good perspective and I live in country that has many security nets to help me If I stumble or fall.

I do feel rich, secure and free.
 

Concelhaut

Member
Jun 10, 2019
501
I believe you call yourself rich when you never have to work again, never have to stress about bills, and can go anywhere you want on an unlimited budget (not so extreme you'd buy a yacht or jet or spend $10k an hour). I could stop playing poker and live a life of OK luxury, but I'd never do that.
That’s a pretty harsh definition.
That’s not rich. That’s royalty
 

SABO.

Member
Nov 6, 2017
2,587
Rich: I'm just under the average wage in Australia (82k) so I guess not :) maybe next year. I have been able to invest in a house and never stressed for cash (though I'm quite tight with how I splash my cash.)

Have I landed my dream job: I'd say so. Not so much the job, but the dream company. Fortune 500 Company that's increasing its ranks YoY, Global Organization. and plays a huge role in today's everyday life and will play a huge role in tomorrow's everyday life.

How did I do it?: started at a smaller company, put in 2 years of solid marketing work with real results, built up a solid reputation amongst senior leadership and waited for the right opportunity to pop up.

A maternity leave cover became available at the company I wanted to go to and I immediately put my name forward. Received the backing of Senior Leadership at my previous company and I was in the door.

Once in the door, I gave it everything I had and made it clear what I wanted from this experience: A permanent FTE position.

2 x maternity contracts later, I'm in a permanent senior position and on the right track to management.

The advice I'd share based on my experience:

- Be clear with what you want. Spell it out if you need to do. Dont leave it up for interpretation or people managers will take advantage of that to fulfill their objectives towards you.
 
Sep 28, 2018
870
I'm doing fine. Currently building my house and should still £65k to spare at the end...

I don't have my dream job of being a novel writer/artist. But I do have an easy job... So there's that.
 

Dark Ninja

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,315
I’m definitely on the road to being well off. It took my entire 20s to focus and building on getting my career going. I have no wife or kids so everything goes to me and have plenty of money to spend and save currently. I have zero debt I paid off all my student loans by being very conservative on what I spent for a few years and just paid off large chunks as much as possible. Currently investing some money for later when I retire. Looking into home ownership or traveling next since I used up a lot of my younger years just working.
 

hephaestus

Member
Oct 28, 2017
377
I dropped out of highschool to work in the trades, i couldn't imagine wanting to do anything else. I love working with my hands and the manual labour of the work. Also the fact im paid a fuck-ton helps alot. I also get to retire at 55 with a large pension.
 

ZeroDS

The Fallen
Oct 29, 2017
957
Japan
Man I know it’s no good to be jealous or feel envy. But holy shit I’m 31, definitely not rich and feeling super fucking bummed out reading some of the responses in this thread
 

Wackamole

Member
Oct 27, 2017
8,238
Man I know it’s no good to be jealous or feel envy. But holy shit I’m 31, definitely not rich and feeling super fucking bummed out reading some of the responses in this thread
The most important thing is finding work you like.
Some people just go for money and a company car. all nice, but being at ease and having fun at what you're going to be doing (with people you like) for a third of your adult life is the most important. Then you buy a great bed. Yes, a GREAT bed. Personalized for YOU. Because that's another third of your life right there.
So you got work you love, a great night sleep and all you have to do is find nice people to spend the other third of your life on. Money is nice. It can buy a certain degree of independence. But don't let it lead you since most people will only do dumb stuff with more money just to show others they're rich.
 
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defaltoption

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,834
Orlando, Florida
A year later and I’m still so broke I’ve already hit the max transfers on my savings account to my checking for the month and it’s only the 14th. I have a spending issue yes but I also have an income issue. For me to have everything I want from life money wise I’d need to make $6,000 a month, I’m not even 1/3 of the way. I want to have enough money to pay my rent and my parents.
 

Manmademan

Member
Aug 6, 2018
4,850
A year later and I’m still so broke I’ve already hit the max transfers on my savings account to my checking for the month and it’s only the 14th. I have a spending issue yes but I also have an income issue. For me to have everything I want from life money wise I’d need to make $6,000 a month, I’m not even 1/3 of the way. I want to have enough money to pay my rent and my parents.
You definitely have a spending problem if you need 6 grand a month as an individual, unless you're in a crazy expensive real estate market.
 

Shiloh

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,004
Seeing how I grew up on food stamps, and still having to skip several meals, that I have a good job and now could live up to a year without changing my life style... I feel pretty well off.

Wouldn't say I'm rich, however.
 

Euphoria

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,159
I wouldn’t call myself rich. We live on Long Island and family income is around $120k/year.

I also HATE my job.


Trying to save up a decent sized emergency fund so I can go to school and get a degree in something I might actually enjoy doing. Just don’t know what that is yet.
 

Euphoria

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,159
Also ERA please never change.

Being able to save money is now considered “rich”. Lol.


Edit - Should clarify that is in reference to a few posts on the first page and not the thread as a whole.
 

fanboi

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,142
Sweden
I would say I am rich, allthough I am in a conundrum right now economy wise (bleeding money).

Dream job? Hm, yeah, maybe, can earn a lot but have the last two years chose not to but instead work at a smaller firm at a lower rate. How I did it? Hard work, always took an oppurtunity when offered, even if I knew next to nothing within the area.
 

Pagusas

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,365
Frisco, Tx
My wife and I make very good money, even living in a high end community like Frisco. I work pretty close to what I’d call my dream job, it’s not perfect but it’s very fun and rewarding and pays off the charts.

I did it, honestly, by working super hard, going to school, getting a degree in the field I wanted to work, getting a low level job in that field at a ad agency, developing a name for my self, taking lots of risk but always being confident in my abilities, and kept working at it until bigger names started knowing my name and requesting me. At that point the money start exponentially increasing, and you become surrounded by people who want to help you succeed, a safety net forms out of your piers that lets you take even more risk without too much fear of falling down to a lower income tier.

I also invested in housing immediately out of college after doing a few freelance jobs to earn extra money. Again, I basically worked really hard and never burned any bridges. I still do contract work for the very first company I ever worked for.
 

Middleman

Member
Jun 14, 2019
425
I started young, got in on the ground floor, worked my fucking ass off, made moves when I saw them, and got to know the right people.

I'm certainly not in my dream job yet, but I love what I'm currently doing.
 

jon bones

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,387
NYC
Not even close to rich, but I do like my job a ton.

We are basically debt free, about to buy a small starter home and make like $180k/year household.

My goal is for us to make $250k by the time we're in our 40s.
 

Shining Star

Member
May 14, 2019
301
I'm not rich at all but I get to perform with a fairly large ballet company here so I definitely have my dream job. I can't really imagine doing anything else.
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,536
NZ
Sounds like you are rich
Edit: sorry didn't notice this thread was so old

I mean I have enough savings to last me several months and my total yearly income from scholarships and tutoring was around the equivalent of working full time for minimal wage (and now I don't even have the scholarship anymore). I don't leave in a cheap place either.

It really depends on your situation. If you're in good health (actually even this is dependent on where you live – if your country has good public healthcare it might not be a huge financial issue to not be so) and single you don't actually need much money to stay afloat. The problems start when you have people to take care of and/or if your country's social safety net fails you.
 

mhayes86

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,097
Virginia
Dream job? What I got out of college was my "dream job". I got with the company that I wanted doing what I got my degree in, made decent money out of school, and it was a great learning experience. I was there for three years and have since moved on. With my current employer, I enjoy it for the most part and it pays well. The only improvement would be an employer that can offer something even better than what I have now. My friends work for a company that has some great perks.

Rich? Lolno. But people in that one Era thread would say otherwise. I'm comfortable.

How'd I get here? It was a struggle, but I was persistent. It took nine years of school to get my associate's and bachelor's degrees, countless resumes, attending career fairs, and even several months of speaking to a recruiter who eventually ghosted me, only to run into her at a career fair where she "recognized" my resume. That started the interview process that got me my job out of college. All the while my father passed away during my time in college. Between the stress of school, helping the family, and working, I could have easily given up from being overwhelmed.
 

eXistor

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,237
I wouldn't say dream job (retail, selling videogames, but it's in the Netherlands so it's not even comparable to Gamestop), but I'm very happy here and they treat me well. Also, I wouldn't say rich, but definitely well-off. I own a house (fully paid for) and a car (also bought) and have a decent amount of savings set aside.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,634
We're not rich, but we're comfortable. I think a lot of people would look at what we make as a couple and say "YEah, that's rich," but it's one of those things that you don't feel rich even though you certainly have more financial security than I did ... 10 years ago and especially ~15 years ago. In truth, I "feel" no richer than I did 5 years ago, or 10 years ago... I never feel "secure" in income, but we are, and we have certainly have more "wealth" than I did 15 years ago. My wife's a teacher so we're not making bank there, but I do pretty well as a software engineer in the Boston area. My yearly income now is a little more than twice what it was 7 years ago.

Still, we have my wife has student loans (~$800/mo or so), we're paying $2000/mo for daycare. Our housing expenses are less than most who live in a major metropolitan corridor. FOr the last 8 years I've compromised on a lower mortgage vs. a longer commute... I spend at least 2 hours a day in the car most days driving in towards Boston from the burbs. The flipside is that our house is about 1/4th the cost of what it would be if I lived within a 15mi radius of Boston. Public transportation sucks in Massachusetts for 90% of residents, so we're part of that 90% where if I took public transportation, it'd take.. ~3+ hours for me traveling and it's just not worth it, especially with an infant that I bring to daycare each day before work.

SO... how I landed my dream job. I don't know if it's a "Dream job," I don't know if I believe in "Dream jobs." I don't believe in the "If you do what you love you won't work a day in your life..." because even when you're in a field that you love, a major portion of your day is spent doing things that you hate... It wouldn't be called "Work" otherwise and you wouldn't get paid for it otherwise. You're doing shit other people don't want to or can't do. I'm a software engineer, I like doing development, I enjoy it most of the time, I like building things ... but 80% of what I do is moving stories around in Jira and updating requirement spec documents, having meetings with senior management, and documenting bugs/features. A lot of the actual coding I do is shitty, frustrating development... Another junior dev is stuck on something and so it kicks over to me to figure out, and it's usually the worst types of problems. Still, this is a field that pays me a lot to do an activity that I like doing -- developing applications -- but the day to day tasks is work.

I've written about this before, but I didn't study computer science in college, but I think I grew up in the right time and had the right access to technology as a kid. I grew up beside the internet in the 90s, started building websites in the mid-to-late 90s, and was doing paid development as a teenager. I never intended to go into technology when I was in college.. I thought I'd do the liberal arts thing and probably become a professor or go to law school. Law school was out of the question for me financially... I had too much student debt after college and couldn't take on $100,000 more. Incidentally around the same time I got offered a job for an organizationt hat I had been working for when I Was a student. They massively undercut me on pay (my first "career" job was $27,500/yr), but I was naive and was just happy to get paid for working. Of course I thought I Was like rich at $27.5... Until I got my first paycheck, paying rent, and it was ~$1336 a month or something and I was like ... "oh fuck... that's... not gonna go very far...." Got into massive credit card debt my first 18mos out of college (~$10,000 in CC debt with high APR), ended up having to move out of my apartment and back in with my parents (my dad was also in and out of the hospital at the time so ... I kinda made myself feel better by saying I was helping out, in truth, my parents were helping me out financially).

Work wise, I always think of myself as lucky... but in truth it's a mix of being lucky, having resources to be lucky, and putting myself in a position to be lucky. I'm an avid self-learner, I've always done a lot of freelance development on the side which has forced me to get out of my comfort zone and learn things that I didn't know otherwise... Which then in turn I spin into new professional opportunities. I also think my basis in the liberal arts has helped me excel at my job faster than if I was a computer science major or technical major. I have strong gaps in computer science, like preparing for a recent interview I had to crash course a Udemy on Algorithms because I just don't have a foundation on such a basic concept in computer science/programming. At the same time, my work and hobbies pushes me into topics that end up becoming relevant... I lucked out by being a JavaScript developed 7 years ago when Node skyrocketed... I was into Ember and Meteor when JS on the backend and frontend became a thing... I happened to follow the founder of 37signals on Twitter and got into Rails when Rails was dominating web application development.

I've had a knack for ingratiating myself with people who then want to bring me onto their teams. When I Got hired out of college it was because I worked with a Web Developer and after I graduated the place he worked for was giving him a team instead of him being a solo guy, so he hired me. That guy was kind of a fuck up, but when he left that organization he offered me a job at his new place (which I ultimately turned down, wisely, but I used that interview to boost my salary by $20,000 or so). He left that other org and then recruited me at that company, where I work now. He was kind of a fuck up and I had to crawl out from under him, but then another person at that company recruited me to his team, etc... and I always kind of say it's luck how this has worked out, but it's a mix of luck and putting myself in the right position to be lucky.

At the same time... I think... like something I feel a lot is that even though we're in good financial position as a family, I feel as though you will never feel more rich than do you at ~25. Or at least, that's how I feel. You make more money but the expectations of expenses go up. I took on my wife's student loans just after I finished paying off mine. I pay for the two vehicles and the bills. I pay for her grad school. She's almost done with grad school now and last year we traded that tuition for daycare. Now that we have a baby the house I bought on my own which I lived in with two roommates for a decade is too small for us and baby so we're moving to a bigger house with a sightly higher mortgage payment. Also this is a weird way to put it but I feel like your financial floor moves up, the base level of expectations moves up. So, like, when I was 23 or 24, my financial floor was... can I pay my rent... can I buy food in the discount isle... can I pay for heat... can I make minimum payments on my credit card... Will my checking account not go negative this month. If those things happened, it was a success for me, and I felt good about it. As time as gone on, my financial floor has shifted, obviously with more expenses, but also with things like ... Am I putting away enough money into my 529 plan for my daughter's education, am I saving enough so when I retire we have enough for monthly expenses, do I have an emergency savings so if I did lose my job, we wouldn't default on our mortgage until I could get a new job...?

Like, now I have an "emergency savings" and "rainy day savings." Emergency savings when I was in my early 20s was like the jar of quarters I was saving to pay for the tolls to go to the beach, and I'd tap into that to buy beans and rice for skinny months. These days I've got a lot more than that in emergency and rainy day savings, but the anxiety of those being low is the same as it was in my early 20s... My responsibilities are higher, the stakes of financial ruin are higher, I've got two people that rely on me for financial stability of their own, where as "when I was broke" financial ruin only ruined me. If you just look at the numbers it'd be so easy to say "wow, yeah, you guys are rich," but ... I dunno, I feel about as rich as I did when I was in my mid-20s; I'm not, I'm absolutely wealthier, but part of me thinks feeling rich is a mindset and I don't think I'll ever have that mindset. Though, I also never complain about what we have and I know that we're a mix of lucky and blessed to be where we are, and so that means giving back because that luck or blessedness was only because others gave to us.
 
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Boiled Goose

Member
Nov 2, 2017
7,733
Not rich yet but making a healthy amount.
Dream job? Not sure but it's a good job in my desired career track.

How? 14 years studying/training in school haha
 

Stinkles

343 Industries
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
13,466
I'm not rich at all but I get to perform with a fairly large ballet company here so I definitely have my dream job. I can't really imagine doing anything else.

Holy crap. Me too. Well, not ballet exactly, more like contemporary dance with classical elements. I mean classical in the sense of restrained, more subtle movements and choreography - you could call it a kind of "ballet of the 2st century" -the interpretation of movement through sitting at a cubicle answering emails and going to a lot of meetings. And we recently stopped the contemporary dance aspect so it's mostly, some would say 100%, sitting in cubicles, emailing, meeting, doing reports and powerpoint decks and stuff. But even that still lets me experience the unbridled joy of dance. And the liberating sense of your body moving slightly backwards and forwards on a knock off Herman Miller chair on a threadbare carpet. One day I might have a Vitrazza glass chairmat and I imagine that would feel a lot like being principal dancer in Swan Lake. Anyway our Dance Company, I mean, arguably more like, regular-not dance-company, is called FML Fasteners and Lubricants Import/Export LLC. One day we'll tour. I just know it.

 

bionic77

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,368
What percent of income makes you rich?

Top 10% is >100k. Top 5% is >250k. Top 1% is probably greater than $1 million a year.

If having fuck you I am getting on my yacht money to sail for europe is what makes you rich than you have to be in the top 1% to be rich.

If having nice cars and a nice house makes you rich then 200-300k a year and up probably gets you there.