Arthouse Cinema |OT| Full Shelves, Empty Wallets

Fhtagn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,360
I’ve already got the Blue Velvet blu-ray that’s been available for a while but given how much of a favorite it is, worth the double dip for the new extras and hopefully the new transfer as well.
 

Net_Wrecker

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,644
One step closer to a Lost Highway Criterion blu.

Maybe one day Disney will open their vault for The Straight Story 😪
 

overcast

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,113
I’ve already got the Blue Velvet blu-ray that’s been available for a while but given how much of a favorite it is, worth the double dip for the new extras and hopefully the new transfer as well.
I intentionally never bought the other version because I believed in criterion.

It paid off. Anyway, how do we feel about the original funny games?
 

Dan-o

Member
Oct 25, 2017
775
So, a friend of mine came up with this idea of setting screencaps of Mulholland Drive to lyrics from Wake Me Up Before You Go Go by Wham!.
I... took it a step further and threw this video together in my spare time.

Sorry if this crosses the line into too much self-promotion... This video isn't monetized and I'm not promoting a channel or anything. Just thought y'all Arthouse Cinema folks might get a kick out of it and pass it along to fellow Lynch/Wham fans. Mods can delete this if it's inappropriate.
 

berzeli

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,996


God this took ages to get a blu-ray. Sci-fi based on a book by Stanisław Lem, who also wrote Solaris, and considered to be a pretty major influence on 2001: A Space Odyssey.
 

NeuralProxy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,442
Italy
Updates on the Criterion Channel, which apparently will not be restricted to the Criterion Collection alone. Nice.

The new service will host the Criterion Collection and Janus Films’ ever-growing library of more than 1,000 feature films, 350 shorts, and 3,500 supplementary features, including trailers, introductions, behind-the-scenes documentaries, interviews, video essays, commentary tracks, and rare archival footage.

It will also feature a constantly refreshed selection of films from a wide array of studio and independent licensors including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM), Lionsgate, IFC Films, Kino Lorber, Cohen Media, Milestone Film and Video, Oscilloscope, Cinema Guild, Strand Releasing, Shout Factory, Film Movement, and Grasshopper Films. Additional licensors will be added in the coming months.

https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6253-the-criterion-channel-announces-launch-lineup
 

ViewtifulJC

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,534
Updates on the Criterion Channel, which apparently will not be restricted to the Criterion Collection alone. Nice.

The new service will host the Criterion Collection and Janus Films’ ever-growing library of more than 1,000 feature films, 350 shorts, and 3,500 supplementary features, including trailers, introductions, behind-the-scenes documentaries, interviews, video essays, commentary tracks, and rare archival footage.

It will also feature a constantly refreshed selection of films from a wide array of studio and independent licensors including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM), Lionsgate, IFC Films, Kino Lorber, Cohen Media, Milestone Film and Video, Oscilloscope, Cinema Guild, Strand Releasing, Shout Factory, Film Movement, and Grasshopper Films. Additional licensors will be added in the coming months.

https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6253-the-criterion-channel-announces-launch-lineup
So even better than Filmstruck. Huzzah!
 

Kikuchiyosuke

Member
Jan 11, 2018
96
Subscribed to the Criterion Channel! Divided the yearly subscription fee in half because my friend also wants in. Can't wait for the official release.
 

Dan-o

Member
Oct 25, 2017
775


God this took ages to get a blu-ray. Sci-fi based on a book by Stanisław Lem, who also wrote Solaris, and considered to be a pretty major influence on 2001: A Space Odyssey.
My copy of this arrived this week and I finally watched it tonight. Definitely a bizarre but exciting film with a really cool score. Glad I bought it!
 

godofcookery

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
533
The Music Room - Satyajit Ray

This film is about a time when the wealth and influence of the aristocracy and landlords of India were fading, and business owners were gaining wealth through their economic dealings. Biswambhar Roy is from a long line of land owners and spends his days slowly selling off his wife's and his own possessions to fund his self indulgent music shows.

I was at odds with myself when watching this film. Each time during the lengthy musical performances I was engrossed as Biswambhar (the main character and landlord) was, especially in his early years. As time went on the music to him became a reflection of wealth and status, and his enjoyment of it, while still total, seemed numbed by his vices. I felt a bittersweet guilt, as it seemed to be letting him indulge and love music, but as the rest of his life and his family fall apart the music became a drug. The first two of three major performances take place before a key turning point in Biswambhar's life. The first specifically shows his appreciation for the music, and shows the early days of his addiction. The second, well, happens at the turning point, and he is no longer just appreciative but entranced. The last takes place several years after, and is more engrossing yet harrowing, with a sense of finality. Also with a final and empty show of power to let his audience know that he deserves respect and spends his last monies to get it. It made me think about how I enjoy my own music and movies.

Ironically the musical performances and composer of the score were tailor made for me, so in some sense I couldn't help but be taken by it all. I will say though, I wish that Ray had more restraint when it came to the placement of the score. There were scenes with Biswambhar that could have stood fine on their own, but seemed to be filled with music for no reason that I could think of. Maybe he just appreciated the compositions, but they were strangely placed in some instances, even though I enjoyed it.


has anyone else seen this film?
 
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godofcookery

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
533
Killer of Sheep - Charles Burnett

The Killer of Sheep was a much different experience than I expected going in. I got a sense of Stan's inability to show his wife the affection she so clearly wants from him, and still feels for him. She asks him why he doesn't smile anymore, like he used to, and we see him later smiling at his daughter. This movie happily eschews a narrative flow, and happily the movie is much more interested in just showing Stan's relation to the outer world. The dancing scene is romantic and sorrowful all at once, his wife holds him and feels his skin like a lover would, but he circles blankly, his hands lazily draped over her hips and to my eyes, unable to connect.

It feels like Stan cauterized himself to his job and in turn parts of his life. Temptation of crime and easier money that the liquor store owner who covets his body are not considered, but neither are the advances of his wife. Stan's view of his value is the work he does, and small bits of opportunity that cashing a check brings. Even so it's a limbo, Stan spends money on this motor, but a bit of carelessness leaves it broken and now, because he doesn't have any 'spare' money left it has to be abandoned.

Similarly later in the film a flat tire prevents them from going to the races where his friend is self assured that his horse will win, but the reality of their situation prevents them from having or getting a spare. I remember a few years ago I helped a man change his tire in Philly. He had been wrestling with his own jack for a while, and i had a unused one in my car, so i stopped and helped him put on his spare. I thought about his future, about having to ride around on a spare tire when he had no money that week for a new tire. The police would surely stop him, and it would cost him more money that he didn't have.

His choice of accompanying music is great, and like The Music Room shows a real love of these songs, and they add interesting textures to these scenes.

I honestly don't think I am completely equipped to watch this movie and understand everything I was shown, but I am glad I did, and will be revisiting it in the future.

This is a lonely thread.
 

Moppeh

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,065
Killer of Sheep - Charles Burnett

The Killer of Sheep was a much different experience than I expected going in. I got a sense of Stan's inability to show his wife the affection she so clearly wants from him, and still feels for him. She asks him why he doesn't smile anymore, like he used to, and we see him later smiling at his daughter. This movie happily eschews a narrative flow, and happily the movie is much more interested in just showing Stan's relation to the outer world. The dancing scene is romantic and sorrowful all at once, his wife holds him and feels his skin like a lover would, but he circles blankly, his hands lazily draped over her hips and to my eyes, unable to connect.

It feels like Stan cauterized himself to his job and in turn parts of his life. Temptation of crime and easier money that the liquor store owner who covets his body are not considered, but neither are the advances of his wife. Stan's view of his value is the work he does, and small bits of opportunity that cashing a check brings. Even so it's a limbo, Stan spends money on this motor, but a bit of carelessness leaves it broken and now, because he doesn't have any 'spare' money left it has to be abandoned.

Similarly later in the film a flat tire prevents them from going to the races where his friend is self assured that his horse will win, but the reality of their situation prevents them from having or getting a spare. I remember a few years ago I helped a man change his tire in Philly. He had been wrestling with his own jack for a while, and i had a unused one in my car, so i stopped and helped him put on his spare. I thought about his future, about having to ride around on a spare tire when he had no money that week for a new tire. The police would surely stop him, and it would cost him more money that he didn't have.

His choice of accompanying music is great, and like The Music Room shows a real love of these songs, and they add interesting textures to these scenes.

I honestly don't think I am completely equipped to watch this movie and understand everything I was shown, but I am glad I did, and will be revisiting it in the future.

This is a lonely thread.
lol I really need to check out Burnett's stuff. The Criterion Channel doesn't have Killer of Sheep but it does have some of his other work. Not sure what I should watch first but I was leaning towards My Brother's Wedding.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,392
Killer of Sheep - Charles Burnett

The Killer of Sheep was a much different experience than I expected going in. I got a sense of Stan's inability to show his wife the affection she so clearly wants from him, and still feels for him. She asks him why he doesn't smile anymore, like he used to, and we see him later smiling at his daughter. This movie happily eschews a narrative flow, and happily the movie is much more interested in just showing Stan's relation to the outer world. The dancing scene is romantic and sorrowful all at once, his wife holds him and feels his skin like a lover would, but he circles blankly, his hands lazily draped over her hips and to my eyes, unable to connect.

It feels like Stan cauterized himself to his job and in turn parts of his life. Temptation of crime and easier money that the liquor store owner who covets his body are not considered, but neither are the advances of his wife. Stan's view of his value is the work he does, and small bits of opportunity that cashing a check brings. Even so it's a limbo, Stan spends money on this motor, but a bit of carelessness leaves it broken and now, because he doesn't have any 'spare' money left it has to be abandoned.

Similarly later in the film a flat tire prevents them from going to the races where his friend is self assured that his horse will win, but the reality of their situation prevents them from having or getting a spare. I remember a few years ago I helped a man change his tire in Philly. He had been wrestling with his own jack for a while, and i had a unused one in my car, so i stopped and helped him put on his spare. I thought about his future, about having to ride around on a spare tire when he had no money that week for a new tire. The police would surely stop him, and it would cost him more money that he didn't have.

His choice of accompanying music is great, and like The Music Room shows a real love of these songs, and they add interesting textures to these scenes.

I honestly don't think I am completely equipped to watch this movie and understand everything I was shown, but I am glad I did, and will be revisiting it in the future.

This is a lonely thread.
Join us in the movie thread! Plenty of art house lovers. Also Killer of Sheep definitely rules.
 

godofcookery

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
533
lol I really need to check out Burnett's stuff. The Criterion Channel doesn't have Killer of Sheep but it does have some of his other work. Not sure what I should watch first but I was leaning towards My Brother's Wedding.
Yea, I have My Brother's Wedding as a part of the disc set, haven't watched it yet though. I'll check it out later next week I think.

I would def track down Killer of Sheep over the stuff on the Channel fwiw.

godofcookery i think most people post reviews/takes over on https://www.resetera.com/threads/movies-youve-seen-recently-may-2019.114481/#post-20381534
Join us in the movie thread! Plenty of art house lovers. Also Killer of Sheep definitely rules.
Sounds good! I will post these impressions in there as well.