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Asian ERA |OT| We don't AGE

Oct 26, 2017
2,360
Let's show some Hapa love: Half-Ghanaian/Half-Japanese Abdul Hakim Sani Brown potentially qualifies for 2020 Tokyo Olympics with a 9.99 second 100 meter sprint. He goes to the University of Florida and is fluent in Japanese; he'll have to place well at the World Athletics Championship this fall to qualify for the Olympics.

Saw that on NHK this morning and put a smile on my face.

I'mma get my ass blacklisted from here if I keep forgetting to include links :P
 
Dec 24, 2017
1,278
One of the hands down worst things about K-Pop being popular is people gatekeeping ethnicity. Apparently I don’t look very Koreans, as compared to boy band members, so now that’s a thing.
 
Oct 25, 2017
10,483
One of the hands down worst things about K-Pop being popular is people gatekeeping ethnicity. Apparently I don’t look very Koreans, as compared to boy band members, so now that’s a thing.
Welcome to the club of suburban kids telling you that you aren't *insert race/ethnicity here* enough because they get most of their exposure through pop culture and media


Should've said "how does one be more korean" and see if they can give you an answer without stereotyping
 
Dec 24, 2017
1,278
Welcome to the club of suburban kids telling you that you aren't *insert race/ethnicity here* enough because they get most of their exposure through pop culture and media


Should've said "how does one be more korean" and see if they can give you an answer without stereotyping
I said that I look like the Korean thug that murders people in movies they aren’t old enough to watch yet.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,199
Did y'all know that eyes can catch colds?
Oh weird, my right eye was like that yesterday concurrently with a nasty regular cold I caught on the weekend. It was watering up all the damn time and it'd feel like burning like I was sleep deprived. I had to bring a face towel to work to wipe it with and get some relief from the burning every few minutes. My left eye also got it but not to the same extent.

Didn't help that the skin around the eyes were completely red and cracked because I'd been wiping it with tissues the day before.

Much better today, thankfully, particularly the cold with the eye slightly lagging in recovery. Now I'm armed with moisturiser and face towel.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,831
https://www.resetera.com/threads/sat-to-give-students-‘adversity-score’-to-capture-social-and-economic-background.117285/

I actually think it's a good idea. I do think it will hurt Asian Americans, and I want transparency in the scores, but if they do it... I'm all for it.

Would be nice if there was a way to verify address / schools, though.
I don't like it. Why bother with standardized testing if you're just going to skew the results with a nebulous, subjective factor?

The lack of transparency makes it even worse.
 
Dec 24, 2017
1,278
I’m not a fan. However, I’m less of a fan of how white and Asian conservatives have hijacked the issue of affirmative action as a racist policy.

Asian-America, the diaspora, is not in the best place. People can’t seem to get past that Asian-America is more than just China, Japan, Korea and maybe India. The newer immigrant groups are struggling in this country economically and academically. The high school graduation rates for some Southeast Asian immigrant groups is profoundly low.

It is weird and nebulous. I want there to be a better option.

But my “Fuck you” instinct towards white conservatives that use Asian-Americans as a wedge against other people of color, and well off immigrant groups who don’t give a fuck about the diaspora or Asian-America as a whole, is much, much stronger.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,208
Asian-America, the diaspora, is not in the best place. People can’t seem to get past that Asian-America is more than just China, Japan, Korea and maybe India. The newer immigrant groups are struggling in this country economically and academically. The high school graduation rates for some Southeast Asian immigrant groups is profoundly low.
It doesn't help that Mainlanders were pushing against this. I think they lost the census fight at least.
 
OP
OP
Pet
Oct 25, 2017
2,838
SoCal
I don't like it. Why bother with standardized testing if you're just going to skew the results with a nebulous, subjective factor?

The lack of transparency makes it even worse.
I think because standardized testing is unfair in that it rewards (in relation to intelligence):

1. A large amount of mediocre rich people
2. A decent chunk of honestly probably slightly above average upper middle class people
3. A small percentage of extremely intelligent poor people

Though yeah, I think the lack of transparency makes most of us Asian Americans go... uh, this is "holistic review" all over again, aka yellow fear.

(And for full disclosure, for academic/socioecon purposes, I consider myself a mediocre to slightly above average upper middle class person. I do extremely well on standardized tests, but I honestly attribute it primarily to my SE background. If I were poor, I wouldn't be getting the scores that I get. I have the scores of a slightly above average middle class person- everything above 750s, but I would probably be scoring around the low 600s if I were poor.)


I’m not a fan. However, I’m less of a fan of how white and Asian conservatives have hijacked the issue of affirmative action as a racist policy.

Asian-America, the diaspora, is not in the best place. People can’t seem to get past that Asian-America is more than just China, Japan, Korea and maybe India. The newer immigrant groups are struggling in this country economically and academically. The high school graduation rates for some Southeast Asian immigrant groups is profoundly low.

It is weird and nebulous. I want there to be a better option.

But my “Fuck you” instinct towards white conservatives that use Asian-Americans as a wedge against other people of color, and well off immigrant groups who don’t give a fuck about the diaspora or Asian-America as a whole, is much, much stronger.
PREACHHHHHHHHHHHHH.



Also, I recently refound this great article about why Asian Americans "do" so well in school.

https://items.ssrc.org/it-takes-more-than-grit-reframing-asian-american-academic-achievement/

Key passages:

In Los Angeles, Asians graduate from college at higher rates than all groups, including Whites. More than half (51 percent) of Asians in LA have at least a college degree compared to 48 percent of whites, 26 percent of blacks, and 12 percent of Latinos.1 Most of us are no longer surprised by findings like these. We hear and read about the exceptional educational outcomes of Asian Americans when colleges and universities—especially Ivy Leagues—release their latest admissions figures.

“These figures would be unremarkable if Asian American students uniformly hailed from high socioeconomic backgrounds, but this is not the case.”

Asian Americans make up more than one-fifth of the entering classes in Ivy League universities like Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Columbia yet are only 6 percent of the country’s population. In prestigious public universities like the University of California, Berkeley, they comprise more than 40 percent of the student body. These figures would be unremarkable if Asian American students uniformly hailed from high socioeconomic backgrounds, but this is not the case. Even the children of Chinese immigrants and Vietnamese refugees whose parents have less than a high school education graduate from college at nearly the same rate as their middle-class peers, pointing to a vexing Asian American achievement paradox.

First, not all Asian groups—even those who share a Confucian orientation—boast high levels of education. For example, while 72 percent of Indians, 53 percent of Koreans, and 49 percent of Chinese in LA have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher, the corresponding figures for Vietnamese and Cambodians is 30 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Moreover, about one-third of Vietnamese (30 percent) and Cambodians (36 percent) and nearly one-fifth of Chinese (18 percent) do not have a high school diploma. Disaggregating data highlights the enormously diverse outcomes among Asian Americans, who are often studied as a monolith.

[We] assert that there is nothing essential about Asian culture or values that promote exceptional academic outcomes. Rather, the cultural manifestations of Asian American achievement have legal and structural roots—namely the change in US immigration law in 1965 that altered the socioeconomic profiles of Asian immigrants. Privileging those with high levels of education and skills, the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 ushered in a stream of highly educated, highly skilled immigrants from Asia.

The change in immigration law explains why contemporary Asian immigrants are, on average, highly educated and highly selected. For example, 51 percent of US Chinese immigrants have a college degree compared to only 4 percent of adults in China, meaning that Chinese immigrants in the United States are more than 12 times as likely to have graduated from college as their non-migrant counterparts. In addition, they are more highly educated than the general US population, 28 percent of whom are college-educated. We refer to this dual positive immigrant selectivity as hyper-selectivity, and as figure 1 shows, we find similar patterns for Korean immigrants in the United States. While Vietnamese immigrants are less likely to have graduated from college than the US mean, they are still positively selected compared to their non-migrant counterparts.

Hyper-selectivity has both direct and spillover effects. First, hyper-selected immigrants import class-specific cultural frames, institutions, and mindsets from their countries of origin, including a strict success frame. The frame not only spells out a clear definition of success, but it also lays out a clear pathway to achieve it.

Many Americans work hard, are smart, and exhibit grit in spades. In spite of this, Americans will not graduate from college at the same rates because we begin the race at different points on the starting line. Moreover, some Americans get extra boosts during the race to help them speed across the finish line. So before we measure someone’s success by their diplomas, jobs, or zip codes, let’s first ask about the diplomas, jobs, and zip codes that came before them.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,831
I think because standardized testing is unfair in that it rewards (in relation to intelligence):

1. A large amount of mediocre rich people
2. A decent chunk of honestly probably slightly above average upper middle class people
3. A small percentage of extremely intelligent poor people

Though yeah, I think the lack of transparency makes most of us Asian Americans go... uh, this is "holistic review" all over again, aka yellow fear.
My point was that adding a broken feature on top of a broken system isn't going to fix the system.

And yeah. This reeks of trying to push "holistic view" by quantifying it. Doubly so when they want to keep scores invisible.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,284
Don't think it should be a black box, because public examination/criticism can cause the system to be improved. I'm fine with noting when test takers are coming from groups disadvantaged in society though. That will help Asians too, since many Asian immigrant populations are struggling here.
 
Oct 25, 2017
561
As an Asian American, I would never trust black boxes with college admissions.

The adversity rating would have been amazing for me (if there wasn't some sort of auto -1000 points for Asians) though since I

Lived in a trash neighborhood. The neighborhood is so bad that the house is worth less now than when it was bought in 1988. There was tons of crime and the local elementary school had to shut down. The local high school while much better was still below state average.

Legally single parent, had free lunch, ESL, parent never finished high school or even know English.

Ironically all the work I've done to prevent adversity for my kids and this is going to hurt my kids pretty bad.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
10,483
Could be useful but yeah, standardized testing has its problems beyond just that


Funny story, when I went to take the SATs in highschool, our tester wasn't from our school and he did a double take at my name and me because he was expecting an Asian kid because of my last name (happened a lot, actually...). Literally belted out a "You're Z-Beat???"

Then he proceeded to talk shit on our school for a bit, completely unaware that 90% of the kids in that room were from our school