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Asian ERA |OT| We don't AGE

OP
OP
Pet

Pet

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,841
SoCal
Yo that AJ documentary on the Mississippi Delta Chinese blew my fucking mind. What struck me the most was that they didn't use chopsticks during their dinner. I was a little sad seeing that.
I... use forks during dinner at home.

It takes way less skill to stab things than to use chopsticks ;_;.
 

Zen

Member
Nov 1, 2017
3,056
I use chopsticks instead of a fork a lot of the time, even for some food that it makes more sense to use one. Habits die hard
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,365
Huh, I wasn't sure, so I checked and it looks like the Chinese arrived around the same time? late 1800s. I'm not familiar with NYC though. I always heard American Chinese food really came from SF, but I could be wrong. I also checked and it looks like a lot of the immigrants to SF, at least, came from the southern provinces, which would explain why food just isn't as spicy up there, haha.

& yeah, I agree with you about SF's Chinese food. There's lot of delicious places, and the dim sum there is actually, imho, the best in Cali, yet a lot of other kinds of Asian food still retain the American fusion. Thank goodness I live so close to the 626 :p.

(But I dream about the egg yolk buns I got from this one place in SF that my friend took me to and I have no idea what the name was but oh my god it was so perfect and delicious and <333)
So, you both are right. :P

The first Chinese food to be popularized in America was in SF, thanks to the Cantonese railroad workers.

However, chop suey was the dish that made Chinese food sexy again, after the exclusion act and the yellow peril bullshit. During the Jazz Age (1920s) many white Americans in NYC were curious about multicultural food and music. Chop suey houses became SUPER popular in New York City, and was basically what started the modern American Chinese food industry.
 
Oct 25, 2017
13,502
i find chopsticks have a more limited range of dishes that it's useful to have them with, mostly bowl food. Fork and spoon is pretty universal. Also, soups. But I do a lot of couch eating these days which is probably a bit bad lol.

I don't want to say the Asian-Australia experience is great or perfect or whatever but it feels like there's even more dimensions to the Asian-American experience @[email protected]
 
Dec 24, 2017
1,285
Yo that AJ documentary on the Mississippi Delta Chinese blew my fucking mind. What struck me the most was that they didn't use chopsticks during their dinner. I was a little sad seeing that.
Yeah, further north, in Missouri is where I met this girl, last name Chung. I thought she was already married, given that she looked white as white could be. Her Chinese heritage goes back to the Civil War. That was mind blowing.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,204
is chinese american culture so... bubbled? Even with regards to chinese food? You can get mind-blowing chinese/indo/thai/viet etc food like anywhere in the Sydney CBD and I dare to say it seems a cut above orange chicken or the tales I hear about american-chinese food...
Go try a Chinese restaurant in, like Bathurst or some place. I imagine that's the same sort of Chinese food that's been "adapted" for Western tastes. There used to be a lot more of those types of restaurants in the 90s but I think in the last 20 years or so that has changed.
 
Dec 23, 2018
37
I don't know if this was ever posted, but they were some tweets made by some prominent white feminist lambasting Marie for not speaking English. After she was called out on it, she of course put out some half-hearted "sorry you were offended" tripe and waxed on about about the waning of America's imperialistic influence or some such nonsense. Did a double-take when I read that bs.

These knuckleheads have such a huge blind spot when it comes to anything Asian (or probably just any ethnic minority in general).
 
Dec 24, 2017
1,285
Speaking to white progressives sometimes:

I actually had this conversation last night with people regarding white progressive "allies." The topic of public shaming came up, which eventually went down the path to Nazi punching. People were talking about how their grandfathers/great-grandfathers beat the Nazi's, and how they were down to punch a Nazi. I was pretty scornful about the conversation and people's exuberance about Nazi punching. And I think its pretty typical for privileged political posturing, you say something kind of extreme, but its still pretty milquetoast. Because your Democrat voting white friend doesn't have a palpable fear or apprehension of Nazi's/white supremacy, they still have a passive option where not engaging the problem still really won't affect them. They make enough $ that even if the economy stalls, it will reduce maybe their leisure/luxury spending, but it won't force them skip meals. White progressive politics likes have a cushion. I don't blame them, who doesn't want something to soften the blow? But man, when they see their politics as the only sensible way to resist, it's so fucking colonial.
 
Dec 23, 2018
37
Insert MLK quote about white moderates.

White progressives are toothless in this country, and they likely know it. It's why they seem so passive and complacent about pushing forward any positive social change. A lot of them are rather ignorant about this country's dark past too. A good number of white progressives I've spoken with had no idea what I was talking about when I told them about Vincent Chin, or the Tulsa Race Riots.
 
Oct 27, 2017
644
NYC
I heard it actually started in NY.

As for SF Chinese food, I would say having that style of food here for so long makes it worse than what's available in SoCal, as the SF palette got used to it. So whereas SoCal's cuisine evolved to include more (ugh) authentic food from Asia, SF kind of kept a lot of that Americanized hybrid style.
Last summer, I went to the Museum of Food & Drink in Brooklyn & there were lots of artifacts like old menus & photographs during the creation of Chinese food in the USA. Unfortunately, I forgot where it all started because the museum also had an open kitchen serving tasty stir-fried dumplings & a mushroom salad. I may have taken a picture of some of the items on display, I'll scan my photo album.


Ya, that's how I grew up. Even worse, when I grew up the chopsticks we had in the house were only used to stir things.
Oh damn hahahaaa
 
Jan 28, 2019
45
Hi, I’m new please be nice

I don't know if this was ever posted, but they were some tweets made by some prominent white feminist lambasting Marie for not speaking English. After she was called out on it, she of course put out some half-hearted "sorry you were offended" tripe and waxed on about about the waning of America's imperialistic influence or some such nonsense. Did a double-take when I read that bs.

These knuckleheads have such a huge blind spot when it comes to anything Asian (or probably just any ethnic minority in general).
Is this about the Ehrenreich thing? I dunno, maybe I’m just inclined to give more of the benefit of the doubt because I’ve read some of her work and also her daughter is a regular on one of the podcasts I listen to, but I honestly think it was just a very poorly worded joke and she wasn’t trying to shame Kondo for not speaking English. Maybe public figures should do a better job of reading their tweets and thinking about how they will sound to random people, especially in the present political climate, but the pile-on has been a little extreme, imo.

Also, chopsticks are the most superior eating utensil and no one will be able to convince me otherwise.
 
Oct 25, 2017
716
Is this about the Ehrenreich thing? I dunno, maybe I’m just inclined to give more of the benefit of the doubt because I’ve read some of her work and also her daughter is a regular on one of the podcasts I listen to, but I honestly think it was just a very poorly worded joke and she wasn’t trying to shame Kondo for not speaking English. Maybe public figures should do a better job of reading their tweets and thinking about how they will sound to random people, especially in the present political climate, but the pile-on has been a little extreme, imo.
Absolutely not. When you think about a racist incident like this and frame it around the intention of the white person, you're automatically blinding yourselves to the victims and solely viewing the situation from a white perspective.

An example that comes to mind is when a bunch of high-school kids spelled out the N-word in a yearbook or something, and there was a conversation in the old place where some people said that "oh no these kids shouldn't have their lives ruined." What about the black kids who had to learn in this racist environment? Wouldn't their academic performance be affected? Weren't their lives ruined?

We see similar reactions here, when a white person enabled the implicit bias that those of us who can't speak English are less American. The white perspective is "oh her career could be hurt". To me, the perspective should be: How does that affect our siblings that just recently came over or grew up ESL? How does that affect our parents? Our grandparents? To perpetuate the idea that they, by virtue of having the courage to come to this country, are inherently worth less because they know less English?

And perhaps all this could have been forgiven, would have been forgiven, if not for a milquetoast "I'm sorry if you were offended by my humor" non-apology. That's not asking for forgiveness from a position of genuine empathy and humility. That's something you say when people are mad at you and you still think you're right.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,816
Absolutely not. When you think about a racist incident like this and frame it around the intention of the white person, you're automatically blinding yourselves to the victims and solely viewing the situation from a white perspective.

An example that comes to mind is when a bunch of high-school kids spelled out the N-word in a yearbook or something, and there was a conversation in the old place where some people said that "oh no these kids shouldn't have their lives ruined." What about the black kids who had to learn in this racist environment? Wouldn't their academic performance be affected? Weren't their lives ruined?

We see similar reactions here, when a white person enabled the implicit bias that those of us who can't speak English are less American. The white perspective is "oh her career could be hurt". To me, the perspective should be: How does that affect our siblings that just recently came over or grew up ESL? How does that affect our parents? Our grandparents? To perpetuate the idea that they, by virtue of having the courage to come to this country, are inherently worth less because they know less English?

And perhaps all this could have been forgiven, would have been forgiven, if not for a milquetoast "I'm sorry if you were offended by my humor" non-apology. That's not asking for forgiveness from a position of genuine empathy and humility. That's something you say when people are mad at you and you still think you're right.
Boom

Call that shit out everywhere.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,095
I got an essay due next week so procastinating on discord sounds v tempting, but as it usually goes with fast-paced social media in the U.S. I'm usually asleep when all the action goes down lol.
 
Oct 25, 2017
757
Berkeley, CA
In semi-related news, had a discussion with somebody that went to an Andrew Yang rally/breakout session this weekend. He was taken by a friend and said it was very informative, but he said that he also feels like Yang is an awareness candidate, not one that's seriously considering being president.

If Yang's powerbase is anywhere though, it's def the Bay Area, since it has that technocratic/capitalist thing going on as well as a relatively large population of Asian-Americans.
 

Slayven

You probably post about me on another board.
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
31,262
I am always amazed at watching cooking shows and chefs use chopsticks to handle the food. They have such amazing dexterity. Especially when using a wok that is being heated by the flames of hell itself.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,204
English is my primary language and it's always been drink soup to me? Though eat soup doesn't sound wrong to me when I'd hear it either, I'd just never use it. It depends on how thick the soup is and what's in the soup, I guess.
 
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