Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

AusGeno

Member
Oct 27, 2017
319
Oct 25, 2017
12,410
I've probably ranted on this before, but my least favorite trend in cycling right now is "Gravel". I know why these big name companies are doing this, but it just really irks me.
 

Frontieruk

Member
Oct 25, 2017
421
Seeing that tyre, the bike repair man my work pays to fix workers bikes was in on Tuesday, his first job was replacing a gatorskin tyre on a Fuji... The reason? The tyre had delaminated the rubber was pretty much no longer attached to the fiber inners wtf?
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
795
Are latex tubes worth the hassle!?
There isn't much hassle. You'll want to be a bit extra careful that the initial install is clean; sharp edges in the rim bed will eat through latex tubes more easily than butyl. Basically, you'll want to ensure that your rim taping is in good shape. Latex tubes lose air faster than butyl, but you should be checking and setting tire pressure before every ride anyway. Out on the road, latex is just as durable as butyl.
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,298
I have a question about chain maintenance, how resilient is factory lube on new chains? So, I changed the chain about two weeks ago. Today I rode through some dirt road so I had to wash my bicycle with some water and soap, including my drive train. Does this means that the factory lube is gone and I have to re-grease it?

I adjusted the speeds after washing it and the drive train was kinda noisy, IDK is this is because the lube is gone or because my speed adjustment was lousy (I'm kinda new to do that on my bike). Ty for your answer!
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
699
I have a question about chain maintenance, how resilient is factory lube on new chains? So, I changed the chain about two weeks ago. Today I rode through some dirt road so I had to wash my bicycle with some water and soap, including my drive train. Does this means that the factory lube is gone and I have to re-grease it?

I adjusted the speeds after washing it and the drive train was kinda noisy, IDK is this is because the lube is gone or because my speed adjustment was lousy (I'm kinda new to do that on my bike). Ty for your answer!
I don’t know if you specifically cleaned your chain as well (with a chaincleaning tool), but when you wash your bike dirt and grime tends to be pushed further in between the rollers. That will actually make the chain more squeeky.
Degreasing the chain and cleaning it with a chain cleaning tool and then lubing it after its dried is my preferred method.

 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
795
I'd recommend against using a chain cleaning tool. Or any kind of degreaser product.

Getting a chain totally spotless is pointless. Wet lubrication - which is what most people ought to be using - will cause a chain to get black near-instantly on the next ride anyway. And a thorough degreasing will often strip the lubricant from the internals of a chain without actually getting the grit out, which can result in a "well lubricated" and "clean" chain that squeaks.
Stripping a chain to bare metal makes sense if you're preparing the chain for a wax bath in anticipation of an Hour Record attempt, but otherwise... eh.

Most wet lubes serve as a competent cleaner for themselves. If a chain is dirty or needs new lube, just hit it with a hefty dose of a good wet lube. Come back a few minutes later with a rag, and wipe off. Easy, thorough, and 98% as clean as a chain has any business being.
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
699
I don’t know if you specifically cleaned your chain as well (with a chaincleaning tool), but when you wash your bike dirt and grime tends to be pushed further in between the rollers. That will actually make the chain more squeeky.
Degreasing the chain and cleaning it with a chain cleaning tool and then lubing it after its dried is my preferred method.

I'd recommend against using a chain cleaning tool. Or any kind of degreaser product.

Getting a chain totally spotless is pointless. Wet lubrication - which is what most people ought to be using - will cause a chain to get black near-instantly on the next ride anyway. And a thorough degreasing will often strip the lubricant from the internals of a chain without actually getting the grit out, which can result in a "well lubricated" and "clean" chain that squeaks.
Stripping a chain to bare metal makes sense if you're preparing the chain for a wax bath in anticipation of an Hour Record attempt, but otherwise... eh.

Most wet lubes serve as a competent cleaner for themselves. If a chain is dirty or needs new lube, just hit it with a hefty dose of a good wet lube. Come back a few minutes later with a rag, and wipe off. Easy, thorough, and 98% as clean as a chain has any business being.







Hahaha, two wildly different opinions... But I guess that's okay.
I guess it's a matter of picking whatever works for you.
 

bawjaws

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,316
I think it all comes down to where you ride and in what conditions. One of my main commuting routes is along the seafront and the amount of sand and sandy dirt that my bike picks up means that just reapplying a wet lube isn't going to cut it - I need to get that sand out of there rather than rely on the lube to carry it away.

I actually try not to use wet lube wherever possible - I use dry lube most of the year round apart from during prolonged periods of wet weather. As I see it, when your wet lube goes black it's because it's picked up dirt, and that dirt is now being introduced to all of those lovely expensive components in the drivetrain.

I tend to do the "wipe clean and re-lube" method through the week and, if necessary, the degrease and proper clean method at the weekend when I've got the time. I quite like those Park Tool chain cleaners. Each to his own, though.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,410
I probably destroy my chains because I use shit like foaming degreasers or diluted simple green. For me it's more a matter of just getting gunk out. i don't care about a clean chain.
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
699
Yeah my main reason for going full clean is that dirt and grime eventually destroy my cassette/ derailleur and chain ring.
I'd rather pop on a new chain every so often than replace all the other more expensive parts...
It might be overkill, but as said... It's a personal preference.
 

Senger

Member
Oct 27, 2017
30
I use a wax lube (White Lightning) every 50-150 miles depending on the bike/conditions. Same for the mountain bike except that gets lubed after every ride. Never clean, wipe or degrease the chain. Apply and let dry.

The first chain on my commuter lasted ~8k miles. Chain on "nice" bike is almost at 4k. Mountain bike is still on its first chain as well but hasn't seen the same kind of mileage. Chainrings and cassettes look ok. Mostly dry conditions but have had a few wet rides with the unusual amount of rain we've had in SoCal. I guess I'm in the lube and forget about it camp.
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,298
Doesn't wax needs to be applied on sparkling clean chains, or that is just for the treatment ones?
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,298
I don’t know if you specifically cleaned your chain as well (with a chaincleaning tool), but when you wash your bike dirt and grime tends to be pushed further in between the rollers. That will actually make the chain more squeeky.
Degreasing the chain and cleaning it with a chain cleaning tool and then lubing it after its dried is my preferred method.
I cleaned my chain with a wet rag to remove obvious dirt. Didn't de-grease it, though. Do you think that the factory lube is done for?
 
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HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
795
Doesn't wax needs to be applied on sparkling clean chains, or that is just for the treatment ones?
There are multiple types of wax lubricant. White Lightning uses wax suspended in a solvent, so you drip it from a bottle like typical lubes. The other way to lubricate a chain with wax is to immerse it in a hot wax bath. (Since this lubricates the chain's internals, and since it requires removing the chain anyway, it would be kind of weird to not strip the chain to bare metal first.)

I cleaner my chain with a wet rag to remove obvious dirt. Didn't de-grease it, though. Do you think that the factory lube is done for?
If your chain is squeaking, absolutely. If not, I dunno.

It shouldn't really matter, though. Any time you're unsure about whether your chain has adequate lubrication, you should reapply lubrication.
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,298
Sorry about asking so many questions, but google doesn't seem to give the answers to this one... Is there any difference to bike specific citric de-greasers to a (much cheaper) kitchen one!? Ty!
 

Senger

Member
Oct 27, 2017
30
Doesn't wax needs to be applied on sparkling clean chains, or that is just for the treatment ones?
I've read that as well. I think the instructions recommend cleaning the chain first before applying as well. But I never fussed with it. Just applied and let dry. I did apply more often with a new chain to let the wax saturate but I'm not sure if it made a difference.
 

LJ11

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,225
I started waxing my chain this winter. Used mineral spirits, multiple baths, installed a whipperman link, and got a cheap crockpot to melt the wax. Recycled the spirits by letting the gunk settle to the bottom, and filtered it out with coffee filters. My uncle used to do this shit when he was a kid, read about it and said why not try it, I think I’m going to stick with it. Sounds like a lot of work, but cleaning the chain initially takes the most time. After that I just drop the chain in Molten Wax, set the crockpot, and wait about an hour. Pull it out and it’s ready to roll. Shifting is really smooth, thought drive drain would be louder but I didn’t notice much of a difference.
 

AusGeno

Member
Oct 27, 2017
319
I have a question about chain maintenance, how resilient is factory lube on new chains? So, I changed the chain about two weeks ago. Today I rode through some dirt road so I had to wash my bicycle with some water and soap, including my drive train. Does this means that the factory lube is gone and I have to re-grease it?

I adjusted the speeds after washing it and the drive train was kinda noisy, IDK is this is because the lube is gone or because my speed adjustment was lousy (I'm kinda new to do that on my bike). Ty for your answer!
I was recently told by the tech at Giant bikes that the factory lube is really for preventing rust and keeping the links sealed for shipping and storage and is a bit too thick for an actual chain lube.

As a result of its thickness though it does make the chain very, very quiet and actual chain lubes will never be as quiet.

I used Rock n Roll Red for a while but found it a bit too thin, I'm using Bike Milk now - I get the best results when I hose and wipe my chain until it stops leaving black marks on the rag then I give it a good coating of Bike Milk then I leave it for a few hours and give it a light wipe down.

Makes the chain nice and quiet for 100kms or so and doesn't attract gunk.

If it gets really, really filthy I'll use the Muc off chain cleaner like the one posted above.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,410
What do you do when you go for a saddle swap but the new one is longer? My fit measurements are based off the saddle nose as it relates to the bottom bracket. Is it normal to just do the same with the new one or should I adjust for for the difference?
 

Teggy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,939
Hey, looks familiar!



I had a Garmin Edge 500 for 8 years before getting the Bolt. Big upgrade. No more plugging into the computer after every ride and my Stages doesn't drop data anymore.
Wait, there’s a yellow one now? Now I really need to get employed again so I can get a second one. Well, second and third, I need that red one too. Or detachable faceplates would be best.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
795
What do you do when you go for a saddle swap but the new one is longer? My fit measurements are based off the saddle nose as it relates to the bottom bracket. Is it normal to just do the same with the new one or should I adjust for for the difference?
The important thing is where/how you actually sit on the saddle. Obviously this is a complex issue, because you might have a whole bunch of different ways of sitting on any given saddle, and different ways of sitting on different saddles. And height and tilt of saddles can be complicated as well, not just fore-aft.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,410
The important thing is where/how you actually sit on the saddle. Obviously this is a complex issue, because you might have a whole bunch of different ways of sitting on any given saddle, and different ways of sitting on different saddles. And height and tilt of saddles can be complicated as well, not just fore-aft.
So I was riding a woman’s saddle from Ergon and they just released the men’s version. As far as I can tell the main difference is the relief channel is shaped slightly different. Everything else looks the same except for maybe a hair difference in height.

The men’s is 17mm longer so I laid it on top of woman’s one while it was still mounted and made sure the rails were even. They were so I just measured off the rail ticks.

Based on how it feels I think I might need to slide it back to account for that 17mm. When i stand and just sit back down I feel like I’m placing to much towards the back line my bones are placing too firmly into the curve instead of it supporting.

Update: slid it back that 17mm and all feels good. My suspicion was right, it was too far forward
 
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Psychotext

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,649
Wankers are at it again...



Buried just under the surface. Ignore the fucking fact that it could just as easily be a horse or a kid that steps on one.
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
699
Wankers are at it again...



Buried just under the surface. Ignore the fucking fact that it could just as easily be a horse or a kid that steps on one.

Wow, that's just twisted in so many ways. As you said it could just as well be a kid that runs into these.
Not that the intent to harm a cyclist on purpose is any less sickening though...

People really don't think about the consequences of their actions all that well do they?
 
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bawjaws

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,316
Aye, I recall you mentioning it previously and realistically there's not a huge amount the police can do short of patrolling the trails 24/7. The people doing this are absolute scumbags. Someone is going to get hurt, and like you say imagine if it's a kid that treads on one of those.
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,298
Looks like I'm really improving on my climbing!



Sadly, I'm one KG heavier today what I was on 24 of November.... or It was all the wind!? :(
 

Morzak

Member
Oct 27, 2017
114
Also, it looks like need to adjust the HR zones on my Garmin... how do i do that!?

You can do that over the connect app, just select your device and then user settings, after that you can select heart rate zones and set custom zones if you want., but this looks like the HR zones of Strava those can be set in the strava settings.

Started to commute reguraly again, just didn't have the energy with my babygirl beeing more or less sick since the beginning of the year and a lot of freezing and wet weather, which was a bit dangerous... since the cyclepaths weren't well maintained.
 

Teggy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,939
Spent a bit of time on zwift for the first time in quite a few months. Everyone has flames coming off their rear wheel.

I love technology and all my apple stuff but I need to come up with a scheme where doing a ride on zwift doesn’t cause massive havoc to my exercise data.

Edit: LOL, the flames were an April Fools thing
 
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Oct 27, 2017
59
So I'm doing a longer ride this year and I'm thinking me recording it on strava with my phone isn't going to work seeing as it'll take me about 14 hours to complete.

Any recommendations for a bike computer? Would they have enough battery time?