Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

Oct 25, 2017
10,963
Completed my first 50 mile ride today! Can’t imagine ever having the legs for 100 but it was only a few months ago that I said the same thing about riding 50 so I’ll just keep hitting the road and see what happens.

Nicely done! And like others said eventually 50 will feel like an oops ride. I used to have to mentally prepare to do 50 when I first started because all I could really ride was 15-20 as a normal ride. Now 35/40 is basically a normal riding day for me and 50-60 are nothing burger.
 

robox

Member
Nov 10, 2017
482
this video popped up

and reminded me of a thought i've had: is peter sagan currently the best ambassador for his respective sport? someone who is supremely talented at it, loves the sport and is also a genuinely nice guy. i don't follow too many other sports, but steph curry of the nba would be up there too.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
So I just ordered this patch kit.



I can't wait to upgrade the aesthetics of the inside of my saddle bag! I'll be able to fix flats with style!

In other news, I gave my achilles a little test a few days ago. Had fun, but it still irritated the heel. I guess I'll take a few more weeks off and check again.

 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,959
One basic question that nevertheless I have never found the answer for: are tube patches a definitive solution to a puncture or they are just a temporary fix until you can change the tube?

Ty!
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
One basic question that nevertheless I have never found the answer for: are tube patches a definitive solution to a puncture or they are just a temporary fix until you can change the tube?

Ty!
When the vulcanizing solution from the patch kit is applied to an inner tube and a patch, the chemical bonds in both pieces of rubber break apart. After waiting until both surfaces become tacky, when you press the patch onto the tube, the broken chemical bonds can re-form between the pieces of material. The patch isn't merely glued to the tube, it becomes a part of the tube. Done properly, this is a permanent solution.

Glueless patches are a bit different. They're just a sticker, and don't form as good of a bond with the inner tube. If they're holding air, they'll usually continue to hold air as long as the tube is kept inflated in the tire, but they're not always reliable between inner tube installation cycles.
I do carry Park Tool GP-2 glueless patch kits in my saddlebags because they're cheap, weigh almost nothing, take up almost no space, and usually do the job when applied carefully in an emergency.
 

bawjaws

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,097
One basic question that nevertheless I have never found the answer for: are tube patches a definitive solution to a puncture or they are just a temporary fix until you can change the tube?

Ty!
If you patch a tube correctly then it should be totally fine, but it's not always possible to patch (e.g. if the puncture is very close to the "seam" down the middle of the tube). And unfortunately you can't always tell if a patch will hold until the tube is inflated up to proper pressure, at which point a poorly-applied patch will blow off.

Personally, I carry two spare inner tubes in my under-saddle bag and just swap out tubes if I puncture. I don't bother trying to patch at the roadside because it's much more difficult to do the job properly there, so I just wait until I get home and then make the repair using the proper patch kit with the vulcanising solution. I do carry a pack of GP-2 glueless patches, like HTupolev , just in case I'm unlucky enough to double puncture on a ride.

In my experience patched tubes either fail fairly quickly because the patch hasn't taken properly, or they last forever. Because of that, I don't like to use a freshly-patched tube on any sort of long ride or one where having to stop to replace the tube is going to cause problems.
 

T8SC

Member
Oct 28, 2017
738
UK
It's been absolutely scorching for the last few days, Tuesday was a 30 mile time trial and wearing that helmet felt like I had my head in an oven. Still, I shouldnt complain, at least its not raining & or freezing. The heat does sap your energy though.

Tuesday (TT):



Wednesday:



Today:



Thunderstorms incoming now.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
Why did they even design the race that way? It’s baffling.
"They" is basically Henri Desgrange.

Stage races as we know them today did not exist. The original Tour is probably best thought of as a series of randonees, where the idea was to challenge riders to self-sufficiently complete each stage at a solid pace. If a rider failed to complete a stage, it did not eliminate them from the event, but simply meant that they weren't eligible for the general classification.
 

Unicorn

Member
Oct 29, 2017
2,845
So, I have a 1981 Schwinn Sports Tourer that I inherited from my father and I'm trying to do some maintenance and repair for it. I don't want to fuck it up by fitting it with new shit - I love the original look and feel, but brakes need TLC, I'd like to re-wrap the bars, and clean up the bits for the gear shifting and chain.

It's been years at this point since the last time I cleaned and oiled the chain and gears and since then I've ridden it maybe 10 times for less than a mile each ride since then 5 years ago.

Tips on general maintenance and cleaning? Ideas for part repair or replacement? Would pictures help for those unfamiliar with the model?
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
So, I have a 1981 Schwinn Sports Tourer that I inherited from my father
Would pictures help for those unfamiliar with the model?
This?

Anyway, you should probably post picture, because posting bike pictures is always a good idea regardless of context.

What sort of TLC?

I'd like to re-wrap the bars
If you want to keep the tape original-esque, it could be tricky. A lot of Schwinns from that era used Hunt Wilde plastic tape, which hasn't been made in decades. NOS Hunt Wilde tape still shows up in places like ebay, though.

An alternative shiny thin handlebar tape is Benotto Cellotape, which also shows up in places like ebay. It uses celluloid in its construction and has an iridescent appearance.
There's some modern reissue Benotto Cellotape available, although it's supposedly less iridescent and seems more like just a plastic tape.

RJ The Bike Guy made a video showing how to wrap bars the same way that Schwinn usually did it from the factory on bikes like yours.

Another option which would still be period-correct is cotton cloth tape. It was standard for a very very long time. Here's a freshly-wrapped example from my stable:



You can wrap cotton cloth top-down like in the RJ video. When wrapping top-down, the end of the tape can be secured in place by the plug that goes into the handlebar end.
In my case I wrapped it bottom-up, and secured the tape with a twine wrap. People usually use electrical tape to secure the end of a wrap of modern bar tape, but with cotton cloth tape it looks a lot better to tie it down with a string such as hemp twine.

But ultimately, wrap your bars however you like.

On my '79 Fuji, I currently have the bars wrapped with modern cork tape. It's thicker and softer than the original cotton cloth that came with the bike, and it looks different, but it hardly looks bad:



It's been years at this point since the last time I cleaned and oiled the chain and gears and since then I've ridden it maybe 10 times for less than a mile each ride since then 5 years ago.
Check the chain for "stretch." Chains don't really stretch per se, but the link-to-link distance grows as the pins wear down. An elongated chain will shift worse, and will wear the teeth on the gears faster.
There are tools for measuring chain stretch, but you can do it with a ruler, and the ruler is probably the more accurate approach.
Too much elongation and the chain should be replaced. If there's a lot of elongation, the old sprockets will most likely not mesh very well with a new chain anymore, and you might need to replace the freewheel and chainrings in addition to the chain.

You should probably lube at a more frequent interval even if the chain isn't dirty. When I use web lubes, I usually re-lube a chain that's been sitting around for a few weeks even if it's clean, because the lube tends to get dry and sticky over time.
Re-lubing with a wet lube involves drizzling a considerable amount of lube onto the chain (usually dripping over one spot while rotating the drivetrain backwards), waiting a few minutes, and the wiping off the excess with a rag. Unless the chain is severely gunked up, this tends to do a pretty reasonable job of both cleaning and lubricating the chain.

Tips on general maintenance
Depending on how much you care, it would be good practice to overhaul all of the bearings in the bike. Open them up, clean them out, repack them with fresh grease and new balls. Those bearings are the two wheel hubs, the headset, and the bottom bracket. It's hard to guess what specific tools you'd need without looking at the components, though.

Are the currently able to adjust the seatpost and stem, or are they seized?

Ideas for part repair or replacement?
Depends on what needs repair, if anything.

Definitely get new cables and housing for the brakes, if it's been a long time. I'd recommend getting quality housing, low-compression or compressionless, at least on the quality tier of Jagwire CGX.
You should probably get new cables for the shifters, possibly also new housing. If the currently shift cable housing is bare stainless steel coil, you've got a bit of a decision to make: that stuff creates a spongier shift feel than modern shifter housing, but it can also look awesome.

Are you contemplating upgrades?
The catalog indicates that the bike came with chromed steel rims. Besides being heavy, these tend to make for very poor braking, especially in wet weather. Aluminum rims could be much lighter, would brake better, and would still match the look of the bike's silver components.
If your brake pads can be adjusted downward by 4mm, you could even get 700c wheels as the replacements, which would give you a better selection of tire choices (27" wheels haven't been used on new bikes for several decades, 700c is still the current road standard).
Relevant to possible wheel choice, though... is your freewheel 5-speed or 6-speed?
 

Unicorn

Member
Oct 29, 2017
2,845
This?
Anyway, you should probably post picture, because posting bike pictures is always a good idea regardless of context.
Yup! That's the one. I don't have pictures yet, but will gladly share once I pamper it a bit.

Straight up just replacing components - break pads are dried out, cables are mushy, hardware is broken (parallel brake bar for rear break is broken off, but both have perpendicular brakes).

For tape, I will probably do top-down as that is what my dad did. He has a more modern "padded" tape with a sort of foam-ness to it.

The chain most likely needs to be straight up replaced at this point as it has been on the bike for over a decade - I only cleaned it after my dad showed me how about 6 years ago, but it was the chain that was already there. I believe he checked to teething situation at that point too. I'd rather be safe than sorry and replace and then maintain every few months or as needed given the often rainy weather here (PDX).

Depending on how much you care, it would be good practice to overhaul all of the bearings in the bike. Open them up, clean them out, repack them with fresh grease and new balls. Those bearings are the two wheel hubs, the headset, and the bottom bracket. It's hard to guess what specific tools you'd need without looking at the components, though.

Are the currently able to adjust the seatpost and stem, or are they seized?
This also feels a bit out of my league currently. I could see myself replacing the bits and bobs and then restoring what's there in time and once I research the how-to in more depth.

The seatpost is aluminum on aluminum so I don't think there's much seizing. I did replace the seat about 5 years ago and the seat that was on there was not the original - I think my dad still has that stored somewhere.

Depends on what needs repair, if anything.

Definitely get new cables and housing for the brakes, if it's been a long time. I'd recommend getting quality housing, low-compression or compressionless, at least on the quality tier of Jagwire CGX.
You should probably get new cables for the shifters, possibly also new housing. If the currently shift cable housing is bare stainless steel coil, you've got a bit of a decision to make: that stuff creates a spongier shift feel than modern shifter housing, but it can also look awesome.

Are you contemplating upgrades?
The catalog indicates that the bike came with chromed steel rims. Besides being heavy, these tend to make for very poor braking, especially in wet weather. Aluminum rims could be much lighter, would brake better, and would still match the look of the bike's silver components.
If your brake pads can be adjusted downward by 4mm, you could even get 700c wheels as the replacements, which would give you a better selection of tire choices (27" wheels haven't been used on new bikes for several decades, 700c is still the current road standard).
Relevant to possible wheel choice, though... is your freewheel 5-speed or 6-speed?
New cables and housing is a for-sure task. Obviously I'll need to research into this. Shifting is a sloppy feel currently - but a lot could be due to chain gapping or the gross amount of grit going on down there. Again, more research before I jump.

In terms of upgrading, I don't think so. I mostly want it to feel how it was always meant to with either after-market or name-brand pieces. Cost is an issue, so in most cases I'll be looking to restore or clean. Bearings and tiny bits I am fine replacing and just keeping the original bits just to be safe. I have no idea if this bike is even worth anything, but for the sake of sentimental value and the potential later down the road, I'll just keep everything.

I think the rims are aluminum. Obviously I'm not well versed, but I'm measuring 23-25" from the top of the seat tube down to where the pedal crank is. Gear-wise there's high and low with five-speed settings gears in the rear. I had replaced the tires and tubing about 5 years ago and didn't have an issue finding a pair that fit and worked, so I think I'm fine there.


Thank you so much for the detailed response! I am going to ride this rickety thing to work tomorrow and try and stop by the bike shop nearby on the way home. I'm hoping to get chains, bar tape, degreaser and lube for maintenance, and peruse brake solutions.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
The seatpost is aluminum on aluminum so I don't think there's much seizing.

I did replace the seat about 5 years ago and the seat that was on there was not the original - I think my dad still has that stored somewhere.
I meant, can you move it up and down within the frame? Seatpost clamps that hold onto the saddle rarely have seizing issues, but the interference fit between aluminum seatposts and the steel seat tube can create problems over time.

(And are you sure that your saddle rails are aluminum? That's pretty rare, as they tend to be failure-prone. Steel is most common, with titanium and carbon being used for lightweight rails.)

I have no idea if this bike is even worth anything
Not much. It was an entry-level mass-production road bike.

That's not terribly important if you don't intend to sell it, though.

I think the rims are aluminum.
If you're unsure, use a magnet. If it likes the rim, the rim is steel.

with five-speed settings gears in the rear.
Okay, then the spacing between your rear dropouts is probably 120mm. If it was six-speed, then the spacing would likely be 126mm. Complete wheels with 126mm spacing are still easy to find, not so much for 120mm. There are various ways to solve this problem if you decide to replace your wheels at some point, but it'll be trickier than just buying a new set of prebuilt wheels.
 

Daedardus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
729
Anyone thinks it's worth to splurge and buy some Oakleys (or something similarly priced)? Feel like I want some decent goggles but it's always either $5 AliExpress or $150 'makes you go 200% faster' shit.
 

ShapeGSX

Member
Nov 13, 2017
862
My local bike club has a hill climb once a year up a 2 block 18% grade hill. It’s a painful ton of fun. Here’s my video of my run from Sunday.

 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
Woohoo the stuff came in!

To get the boring things out of the way, a saddle and a couple of stems. Everyone can always use more quill stems, probably.



Now, how about that Rustines tin patch kit.



Unboxing...

Multiple patch colors, dramatic!



But for the really important stuff: Nitto B115 drop bars and matching t-shirt! :D

 

ShapeGSX

Member
Nov 13, 2017
862
I took a trip to Salt Lake City in the beginning of June to do an auto driving school for my Ford Focus RS.

While I was there, I rented a Trek Domane SL2 Disc from the local Trek store for $100 to ride up a couple mountains. I rode up Small Mountain and then Big Mountain. While I'm at the top of Big Mountain taking selfies and photos of the landscape, I saw 2 riders with Bora jerseys ride up behind me. I spoke with one of them, asking if they were on a pro team. "Ya" came the response. I went over to the other rider, who was looking at the scenery, and asked if I could get a photo with him. He turned around and it was Peter Sagan!

Best vacation ever.

They were waiting for a teammate, Daniel Oss, to finish climbing the mountain. They were doing high altitude training for the Tour De France. The other rider was their coach. I got a couple selfies with Peter while the other two riders laughed at us.

 

Armadilo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,460
Hello I live in Los Angeles, I need a recommendation on a cheap good bike that I can to go to work and school $400 and below please
 

T8SC

Member
Oct 28, 2017
738
UK
I took a trip to Salt Lake City in the beginning of June to do an auto driving school for my Ford Focus RS.

While I was there, I rented a Trek Domane SL2 Disc from the local Trek store for $100 to ride up a couple mountains. I rode up Small Mountain and then Big Mountain. While I'm at the top of Big Mountain taking selfies and photos of the landscape, I saw 2 riders with Bora jerseys ride up behind me. I spoke with one of them, asking if they were on a pro team. "Ya" came the response. I went over to the other rider, who was looking at the scenery, and asked if I could get a photo with him. He turned around and it was Peter Sagan!

Best vacation ever.

They were waiting for a teammate, Daniel Oss, to finish climbing the mountain. They were doing high altitude training for the Tour De France. The other rider was their coach. I got a couple selfies with Peter while the other two riders laughed at us.

That's a cool photo. Nice timing to meet them.

It's a bit rich of Peter though, it's usually me waiting for him up the climbs!!! :-D





(Yea, I'm joking).
 

Hitmeneer

Member
Oct 30, 2017
97
Anyone thinks it's worth to splurge and buy some Oakleys (or something similarly priced)? Feel like I want some decent goggles but it's always either $5 AliExpress or $150 'makes you go 200% faster' shit.
I'm looking into buying a pair of Oakley or Rudy Project glasses. What I understood is that they look the same almost but the build quality is better, less distortion and the lenses are better obviously. Especially lens safety for me is a big reason to go for the real deal, as the rip-offs will probably shatter upon impact of a stone. I prefer to be protected. Also I don't think AliExpress is able to match the Oakley prizm effect.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
Anyone thinks it's worth to splurge and buy some Oakleys (or something similarly priced)? Feel like I want some decent goggles but it's always either $5 AliExpress or $150 'makes you go 200% faster' shit.
I've disliked every pair of "nice" sporting sunglasses that I've ever worn. Frames with poor retention that irritate the skin (due to a bizarre reliance on stiction rather than geometry), and lenses that fog easily and scuff easier.

The best sunglasses I've used are the ones you can find for $15-$25 at grocery stores or gas stations. The next best sunglasses I've used are the free ones sometimes given out at sporting events; they look stupid, but they're surprisingly durable and comfortable, and seem to mostly get the job done in terms of preventing sunburn to the eyeballs. After that, the worst ones are the fancy stuff, worse in every apparent way than all cheaper options.

But I have a carefree attitude toward the whole "lens shattering" thing, so one day I'll probably lose an eyeball to a stray high-velocity pebble or something.
 

Daedardus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
729
I'm looking into buying a pair of Oakley or Rudy Project glasses. What I understood is that they look the same almost but the build quality is better, less distortion and the lenses are better obviously. Especially lens safety for me is a big reason to go for the real deal, as the rip-offs will probably shatter upon impact of a stone. I prefer to be protected. Also I don't think AliExpress is able to match the Oakley prizm effect.
I've disliked every pair of "nice" sporting sunglasses that I've ever worn. Frames with poor retention that irritate the skin (due to a bizarre reliance on stiction rather than geometry), and lenses that fog easily and scuff easier.

The best sunglasses I've used are the ones you can find for $15-$25 at grocery stores or gas stations. The next best sunglasses I've used are the free ones sometimes given out at sporting events; they look stupid, but they're surprisingly durable and comfortable, and seem to mostly get the job done in terms of preventing sunburn to the eyeballs. After that, the worst ones are the fancy stuff, worse in every apparent way than all cheaper options.

But I have a carefree attitude toward the whole "lens shattering" thing, so one day I'll probably lose an eyeball to a stray high-velocity pebble or something.
Doesn't matter much anymore, found out that the glassss I've been using (just took a pair my dad had lying around) were already $100 ones. They're not the most fashionable one for my face, but it does explain why I didn't really find anything wrong with the quality of the lenses. So aside from another look not much reason to buy another expensive pair and certainly no reason to buy cheap ones either. I'll hold off buying the Oakleys I wanted for a while now.
 

T8SC

Member
Oct 28, 2017
738
UK
I wear these, Oakley Jawbreaker Cavendish Edition. Fantastic glasses, well made, great lenses and stylish (Though that's my opinion).



I've tried some "Jokeleys" and although they aren't too bad for the amount they cost, I'd hate to have an accident with them on, I have a feeling the lenses will end up in your eyes.