Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
633
Horrible indeed. Much, much too young to pass away.
The thing with Broeckx and now this young rider passed away, tragic for the team as well.
 

Teggy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,830
The weather near Lake Michigan is always so nice. I hadn’t taken a ride since early June at home, but since I’ve gotten here I’ve ridden four days in a row.
 

cHaotix

Member
Oct 25, 2017
341
DFW/Texas Riders, how do you deal with the heat? I feel like if I don't get out before 7 AM then I may as well not ride lol. This week has been rough.
 

nelsonqos

Member
Jul 8, 2019
15
On my cycle today I bumped into 3 guys at Perth doing Lands End to John O Groats on penny farthings. Couldn't believe it!

Can't imagine the pain they must go through, especially given the erratic weather in Scotland right now. Those things look like they weigh a tonne!
 

broony

Member
Oct 27, 2017
237
New bike day (Canyon Grail AL 7.0)

Wanted a gravel bike to go exploring in my local area. Theres plenty for long rides in remote areas as well as semi urban stuff nearby for a quick spin. Happy with the bike, need to tweak the saddle a bit but other than that, felt great.

 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
On my cycle today I bumped into 3 guys at Perth doing Lands End to John O Groats on penny farthings. Couldn't believe it!

Can't imagine the pain they must go through, especially given the erratic weather in Scotland right now. Those things look like they weigh a tonne!
Hard to guess weight without picking one up. Lightweight racing ones really weren't that heavy even by today's standards, but weights were all over the map.

Even for the very heavy ones, I'd put weight a long ways down their list of disadvantages.
 

cdViking

Member
Oct 28, 2017
98
Not quite new bike day, but it's coming next week. :) Got a 2018 Specialized Sequoia, and am going to start bike commuting in. Extremely excited as work being busy has made riding/training next to impossible, and work is far enough away (10.5 miles) that I can get 6-8 hours of legit riding in every week just from commuting 3x.

Have a Power2Max crankset targeted (I'm a power fiend), but biggest initial purchase will be wheels (42mm tires are a *little* thick). Looking at Mavic Aksiums (as they should be able to handle a variety of tire widths), but curious what positive experiences people have had with disc wheels supporting a variety of treads (ideally 23mm - 32mm).
 

Muu

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
534
Got 1000mi on my ebike as of yesterday, ~1.5mo of daily commutes contributed to the majority of that mileage. Enormous cost savings and I'm still enjoying every commute.

I tracked my HR using my garmin on a few rides and found that unless I consciously try and rev it up I'm around 120-130HR, which is actually ideal for endurance and/or weight loss. It's helped me lose 5lb or so over this time period, and a Bike MS fundraiser century I did last week felt much easier than I expected it to be -- total actual mileage was 120mi as I rode to the start from home, and I had some energy to spare towards the end. At the HR and with hiking pants I don't sweat so it's been a breeze getting to work and back.

I'm still adding parts to the bike as I see the need -- added Ergon grips, velcroed on my topeak MTX bag. Both tires are filled w/ 3~4oz of Stan's and it's saved me on a couple occasions. Just bought a cheapie battery powered horn so I'll see if that works as well as an Airzound without the need to carry compressed air.
 

Psychotext

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,048
Thanks to some TrainerRoad fuckery I just ended up doing a ramp test. Better than I expected to be honest, especially given I definitely left some in the tank.

I feel properly shaky now though. Even 15 mins of exercise is apparently too much for me. lol
 

WedgeX

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,217
I’ve been riding weekly - only about 45 minutes as that’s all the time I got these days. Had a lot of good days, but some where my energy is nonexistent.

I’m thinking of renting a road bike when I head back to my parents for a week. Anyone have any experience renting from a cycle shop, what to expect?
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
So I set up the greatest allroad gearing arrangement of all time, but the chain rubs the fender and tire when I put it in the small-big.

With the power of threaded bottom bracket shells and 3-piece cranks, this may be solvable, and perhaps I can even decrease the q-factor at the same time...



If this ends up working well, it's going to be amazing.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
No images of the hardware!?
The mathematical beauty of the Excel chart is greater than the physical beauty of the components!

Okay.



It looks pretty much exactly how it did before, except that the RD has a slightly different appearance because it's an Alivio T4000 instead of an Alivio M360. And the 11-32 cassette is pretty much exactly the same as the previous 11-28 cassette, but with a bonus big cog. (Hence the chain interfering: 8-speed cassettes are wider than 7-speed cassettes, so the big cog is farther inboard than before.)

The crank is the same as before, no pics because it's lying on the ground.

I'm also trying out a bit of a cockpit modification. I was hitting the bar tops with my legs when out of the saddle, so I switched to a slightly longer stem. And for funsies, I'm going to try out a Nitto B115 on the bike. It's very similar to the previous bar, and has the same width in the drops, but the B115 has a slight flare and narrower hoods.
What astonished me, particularly given that I didn't buy weight-weenie parts, is that the new stem+bar is about 300g lighter than the previous. O.o



The trick is going to be how I manage to space the chainline farther outboard. Right now the bike has a symmetric 118mm spindle. But if I get a bottom bracket with a flangeless NDS cup, I should be able to space the spindle over to the drive side. I'm thinking about maybe going with a 115mm IRD QB-75, and then offsetting it with a 4mm spacer. That would add 2.5mm to the drive side, and chop 5.5mm off of the non-drive side, (hopefully) solving the interference while also reducing the q-factor.
 

MRrogermoore

Member
Oct 28, 2017
52
Will regular sneakers work for trail riding, and do I really need padded shorts or will any type of clothing work. thanks.
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
633


Rode the Balcony and Huez in the French Alps again.
Such a beautiful place to ride.
Rented a Giant Defy Ultegra Di2 disc which served me perfectly.
It was a good warm up to my trip to Ventoux in three weeks. Aiming to climb that from all three sides in one day.

Thanks to some TrainerRoad fuckery I just ended up doing a ramp test. Better than I expected to be honest, especially given I definitely left some in the tank.

I feel properly shaky now though. Even 15 mins of exercise is apparently too much for me. lol
So good to hear you’re back on the bike! Happy for you man!
 

Fourman

Member
Oct 25, 2017
233
This will be my first winter while taking up cycling and I am in the market for a trainer that I can attach my bicycle to. There are so many and some are offering cool technology, if any of you have any recommendations I would greatly appreciate some. I don’t want to spend more than $150 if possible.
 

AusGeno

Member
Oct 27, 2017
254
New bike day (Canyon Grail AL 7.0)

Wanted a gravel bike to go exploring in my local area. Theres plenty for long rides in remote areas as well as semi urban stuff nearby for a quick spin. Happy with the bike, need to tweak the saddle a bit but other than that, felt great.
Nice ride broony, very cool! I've got some decent clearance on my old roadie, have been meaning to chuck some chunky tyres on it and hit the gravel, you've inspired me.
 

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,959
Cycling is such a bs sport/should be weight categories.

So, when it comes to the descent and unleash all hard earned potential energy of my 87kg ass... only to be forced to hit the brakes by all the skinny guys spinning on their 53/11 gears that passed me during the climb blocking the path... makes me upset.
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
Woohoo I had a new free bike day yesterday!

A true bike-boom 10-speed lightweight!

("Lightweight" means 30lbs.)



My guess is that it was made in '74 or '75, but it's hard to know because Motobecane's serialization scheme was an absolute dumpster fire. On the plus side, it's possible for the number on the bottom bracket shell to have rotational symmetry!



A very long name for a brake!



Cheese grater rims. :)



Stem shifters. D:



The crank worries me. The bottom bracket is loose, and I'm not sure about the condition of the bearing races. And... the crank is cottered. I'm in for an adventure. It'll probably end with either doing a full cottered crank service, or grabbing one of those French-thread square-taper brackets from Velo Orange and throwing a square-taper crank on the bike.



So far, I've done some service around the rear wheel.

The freewheel is interesting, it's a French-threaded SunTour part. It was seized, but I freed it up with some Tri-Flow. Unfortunately, the freewheel bearing is loose, and I wasn't able to open it up with a pin spanner. I'll need to go at it with a punch.

The derailleur is a Huret Challenger, an uninteresting design but surprisingly light and slick.



I repacked the rear hub, and I attacked the rear rim rust with some diet coke and aluminum foil. I didn't get it perfect, but it's certainly looking better than before. Before and after:

 

Teggy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,830
In the midst of my vacation cycling renaissance (6 rides in 8 days!) I signed up for this year’s Hub on Wheels, having enjoyed it in 2016 and 2017 but skipped last year. It’s only 45 miles but I need to spend the next month inching up to 30 miles or so since it’s been so long since I’ve done any decent distance.

Recovered from the long trip home and rode today tho!
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
633
I didn't know this OT existed. Will throw in a pic of my baby.

*PIC*
Welcome and nice bike (I guess? XD I have never set foot in two wheeled affairs in mud or gravel)

In the midst of my vacation cycling renaissance (6 rides in 8 days!) I signed up for this year’s Hub on Wheels, having enjoyed it in 2016 and 2017 but skipped last year. It’s only 45 miles but I need to spend the next month inching up to 30 miles or so since it’s been so long since I’ve done any decent distance.

Recovered from the long trip home and rode today tho!
I always feel like I can squeeze out a bit more when its during an event. Just train as much as you can and do the event on gritted teeth :P
 

Teggy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,830
Welcome and nice bike (I guess? XD I have never set foot in two wheeled affairs in mud or gravel)



I always feel like I can squeeze out a bit more when its during an event. Just train as much as you can and do the event on gritted teeth :P
I’ll be fine. It’s a very low stress ride with very minor climbing.
 

GammaGoblin

Member
Oct 26, 2017
237
the middle of the woods
Hi, I'm a long time reader of this thread but I don't post at all because my rides seem so insignificant in comparison with yours. Now I'm in desperate need of help and advice to not to make a wrong decision.

But let me introduce myself first, in August 2017 me and my GF bought our first bikes at a LBS. We are both in our 30s.

My GF got a Cube Cross Pro,
I got a BMC Alpenchallenge

We started with short rides around the city and they got longer and longer. The next year we went on vacation with the bikes and it clearly showed that's what we like, spent the whole day on the bikes and enjoy it. We are not racers we just like to make long trips, enjoy the surroundings and stop frequently to rest, have a chat, drink and eat a little bit.

As the tours got longer, and the terrain got mixed up as well, the limitations of our bikes showed clearly, GF bike to slow on tarmac, handlebar too wide (she was never really happy with the bike). Mine has the limitations of the fork/tires. And we both have problems in our hands, which usually show after 4 hours ride time. So we thought why not buy something like Ergon Grips to have a possibility to change the Hand position. When we were discussing it, the "old" problems with the bikes came up again.

So we decided, we would not invest more money into bikes we are in generally not happy anymore. Which is totally fine, we tried it out, realized we love biking, and now we are at the point to buy our "dream" bikes.

And that's where it all got really complicated, I read into it and searched for a year now to find the bikes which seem to are suitable for our kind of biking, futureproof to bike packing as well (our project for next year) and should last a long time.

I found a bike which is suitable (steel or titanium frame, rack mounts, generous tire clearance, road bike handlebar, touring/ endurance geometry) but hesitated to buy, because more Infos, check out this and that, but couldn't find a better one, the bike was back ordered, till after summer 2019, then the GRX Groupset was announced and the decision got delayed.

That's the bike we have in our focus:
With a GRX 600 2X.

As it is a bike you can only order online, the whole which frame size is best decision started. I googled and learned about Stack and Reach (calculate our personal ones) and also compared frames with bikeinsights and so on. Forgot to mention we had a bike fit with the purchase in 2017, but the numbers are somehow off (for example bike fit says I'm 189cm tall but I'm only 184). My problem is I can calculate it but the cant interpret the difference of the numbers.

As I know we have very helpful and knowledgeable members here, I kindly ask for support and help from our bike community.

Just to complete my very long post (sorry for that, but I thought I should write my story and not just is that frame suitable, also would like to communicate more here In the future so a proper introduction is the least I could do) I write the hard facts below.

Thanks for reading, your time and help.

Myself: Hight 184cm, inseam 86, Stack 59,34, Reach 39,56

GF: Hight 164 cm, inseam 77, Stack 53,13, Reach 35,42

Myself: Secan 58 T, Difference frame to personal, Stack + 3,8 cm, Reach - 0,1 cm

GF: Secan 51 T, Difference frame to personal, Stack + 3,6 cm, Reach + 1,7 cm.
 

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
633
Hi, I'm a long time reader of this thread but I don't post at all because my rides seem so insignificant in comparison with yours. Now I'm in desperate need of help and advice to not to make a wrong decision.

But let me introduce myself first, in August 2017 me and my GF bought our first bikes at a LBS. We are both in our 30s.

My GF got a Cube Cross Pro,
I got a BMC Alpenchallenge

We started with short rides around the city and they got longer and longer. The next year we went on vacation with the bikes and it clearly showed that's what we like, spent the whole day on the bikes and enjoy it. We are not racers we just like to make long trips, enjoy the surroundings and stop frequently to rest, have a chat, drink and eat a little bit.

As the tours got longer, and the terrain got mixed up as well, the limitations of our bikes showed clearly, GF bike to slow on tarmac, handlebar too wide (she was never really happy with the bike). Mine has the limitations of the fork/tires. And we both have problems in our hands, which usually show after 4 hours ride time. So we thought why not buy something like Ergon Grips to have a possibility to change the Hand position. When we were discussing it, the "old" problems with the bikes came up again.

So we decided, we would not invest more money into bikes we are in generally not happy anymore. Which is totally fine, we tried it out, realized we love biking, and now we are at the point to buy our "dream" bikes.

And that's where it all got really complicated, I read into it and searched for a year now to find the bikes which seem to are suitable for our kind of biking, futureproof to bike packing as well (our project for next year) and should last a long time.

I found a bike which is suitable (steel or titanium frame, rack mounts, generous tire clearance, road bike handlebar, touring/ endurance geometry) but hesitated to buy, because more Infos, check out this and that, but couldn't find a better one, the bike was back ordered, till after summer 2019, then the GRX Groupset was announced and the decision got delayed.

That's the bike we have in our focus:
With a GRX 600 2X.

As it is a bike you can only order online, the whole which frame size is best decision started. I googled and learned about Stack and Reach (calculate our personal ones) and also compared frames with bikeinsights and so on. Forgot to mention we had a bike fit with the purchase in 2017, but the numbers are somehow off (for example bike fit says I'm 189cm tall but I'm only 184). My problem is I can calculate it but the cant interpret the difference of the numbers.

As I know we have very helpful and knowledgeable members here, I kindly ask for support and help from our bike community.

Just to complete my very long post (sorry for that, but I thought I should write my story and not just is that frame suitable, also would like to communicate more here In the future so a proper introduction is the least I could do) I write the hard facts below.

Thanks for reading, your time and help.

Myself: Hight 184cm, inseam 86, Stack 59,34, Reach 39,56

GF: Hight 164 cm, inseam 77, Stack 53,13, Reach 35,42

Myself: Secan 58 T, Difference frame to personal, Stack + 3,8 cm, Reach - 0,1 cm

GF: Secan 51 T, Difference frame to personal, Stack + 3,6 cm, Reach + 1,7 cm.

Firstly welcome, nice to hear you’re enjoying riding together so much! Sounds like the two of you are having a great time.
The bike you have your eyes on seems to be fit for exactly the kind of riding you have in mind. The geometry is built for endurance whilst allowing for more sporty riding should you feel like it. Spot on.
The measurements you’ve given add up with the sizes you’ve selected. So I wouldn’t worry too much on that end. Minor adjustments can be made from the saddle position/ seatpost, and handlebar setup.

You’ve probably already noticed that groupset and wheels are the most expensive part of a build besides the frame. The GRX groupset seems like a good idea if gravel is really something you’re into.
Have you thought about the wheels yet?
It’s an easy upgrade to make later on but I wouldn’t skimp on them in your initial build because they can make or break the feeling of a bike imho.
 

GammaGoblin

Member
Oct 26, 2017
237
the middle of the woods
Firstly welcome, nice to hear you’re enjoying riding together so much! Sounds like the two of you are having a great time.
The bike you have your eyes on seems to be fit for exactly the kind of riding you have in mind. The geometry is built for endurance whilst allowing for more sporty riding should you feel like it. Spot on.
The measurements you’ve given add up with the sizes you’ve selected. So I wouldn’t worry too much on that end. Minor adjustments can be made from the saddle position/ seatpost, and handlebar setup.

You’ve probably already noticed that groupset and wheels are the most expensive part of a build besides the frame. The GRX groupset seems like a good idea if gravel is really something you’re into.
Have you thought about the wheels yet?
It’s an easy upgrade to make later on but I wouldn’t skimp on them in your initial build because they can make or break the feeling of a bike imho.
Thank you very much! I'm glad my research didn't fail me and that the frame sizes seem to fit.

About the groupset - gravel, its mostly mixed terrain with let's say 50% tarmac 30% gravel and 20% more rocky roads. I chose the 600, because of the 46-30T chainset, which should be good for climbing (we do a fair amount here in Austria) as well as heavy loaded riding? Don't know how much different it makes to 48-31T?

I liked the fact that the hoods are a little bit more upright with the GRX and I thought It would help with a more upright position on the bike? Before the GRX groupset was announced, the 105 with a subcompact option was my favourite? Do you think It would be better to go that route?

Wheels I'm still not sure if I should go with the carbon ones. I'm not sure if it is reasonable to have carbon wheels when speed is no concern. But I was surprised to find out they have the same max. weight limits as the aluminium ones. Do you think it will be feeling much different? Price difference is 475, when taking in account I would upgrade to the Hope wheels.



For the tires I hought about Gravelking SK tires 700x43C to be a good fit.

Thank you very much for your reply and looking forward to reading from you if I'm making any sense ^_^
 

HTupolev

Member
Oct 27, 2017
699
I really hope the bottom bracket is salvageable on this thing, because whoa.

Chainrings and bash guard before:



After a bit of scrubbing:



:D
 

phazedplasma

Member
Oct 27, 2017
871

FondsNL

Member
Oct 29, 2017
633
Thank you very much! I'm glad my research didn't fail me and that the frame sizes seem to fit.

About the groupset - gravel, its mostly mixed terrain with let's say 50% tarmac 30% gravel and 20% more rocky roads. I chose the 600, because of the 46-30T chainset, which should be good for climbing (we do a fair amount here in Austria) as well as heavy loaded riding? Don't know how much different it makes to 48-31T?

I liked the fact that the hoods are a little bit more upright with the GRX and I thought It would help with a more upright position on the bike? Before the GRX groupset was announced, the 105 with a subcompact option was my favourite? Do you think It would be better to go that route?

Wheels I'm still not sure if I should go with the carbon ones. I'm not sure if it is reasonable to have carbon wheels when speed is no concern. But I was surprised to find out they have the same max. weight limits as the aluminium ones. Do you think it will be feeling much different? Price difference is 475, when taking in account I would upgrade to the Hope wheels.


Thank you very much for your reply and looking forward to reading from you if I'm making any sense ^_^
The groupset seems like a good choice. With that amount of rocky roads and gravel in mind, that more than warrants the groupset that you've selected.
A 105 would be more suitable with a lot more tarmac riding in mind.

Carbon wheels are an option but as you've said there is quite a bit of price difference.
The feeling will mostly differ in how well they accelerate and hold their speed. Carbon wheels tend to be a bit stiffer but can be built to offer compliance as well.
With gravel riding wheels take a bit more of a beating. Now it's not necessarily true that carbon wheels break faster, but when they do... the price-tag to repair or replace them is just a lot higher.
It's up to you to decide if it's worth the price difference with alloy wheels. That said I do think that you'll notice the difference a lot more when you just ride "road" exclusively.


After a bit of scrubbin

:D
Elbow grease!