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Board Gaming Era |OT| (Mostly) Unplugged Gaming

Nappuccino

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
5,197
Picked up Wingspan and I've played two games so far. The first was a pretty close race, the second was a complete blow out. GF got a lucky draw early on and just racked up the points. Ah well, I'm really enjoying everything, and I'm getting a sense of a few fall back strategies for when you're really struggling with good card draws.
 

issa

Member
Oct 26, 2017
950
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Era of Kingdoms is really fun. Played it once and I really want to play it again. Even though I lost badly because I spent a few rounds waiting for that one card to appear.
 

Bane

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,836
Divinity looks neat and I'll keep an eye on it but there are a couple of things that bother me. The first is why can you not get the side quests without the minis, $40 seems a lot for those. And the second, related to the first, is I hope they don't have a big focus on minis as they don't seem to add anything to the game. Now, I've yet to watch the gameplay video so maybe I'm wrong but it looks like you could easily have a token or standee and save a lot of money.

I really hope it follows a path that interests me enough to pledge, what I've seen of the core gameplay seems fun.
 

Llyranor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,740
So Lynnvander is involved in Divinity OS.

Evil Dead 2 :/

Their Gascony's Legacy KS (due 2017) has still not been released to its backers :/

I'm out.

Lynnvander is responsible for “The Chronicle System” as well as projects in board game design including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Evil Dead 2, Cowboy Bebop: Board Game Boogie, Dragon Ball Z: The Board Game Saga, Star Trek Attack Wing: The Alliance System, Terminator Genisys: Rise of the Resistance, Super Camelot, Shadowrun Sprawl Ops, Reanimator, Red Sonja, Captain Canuck and their own Legacy Line. They are currently designing games for some of the most remarkable intellectual properties in the world including Mega Man, Army of Darkness, Naruto Shippuden, and My Hero Academia.

Heeeeeh....
 

Keasar

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,738
Skövde, Sweden
I love the video games, so I'll keep an eye on it. No tactical grid is a bummer, though :/
I actually find that a lot more interesting. My first thought at the site of a Divinity board game was that is was gonna be a massive game with tactical grid, dungeons, markers and whatnot, but this is a lot more appealing for how it does not fit my expectations. :P
 
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Bane

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,836
So Lynnvander is involved in Divinity OS.

Evil Dead 2 :/

Their Gascony's Legacy KS (due 2017) has still not been released to its backers :/
Are they merely the designers or the publishers that were in charge of those campaigns? If they designed the games but didn't have anything to do with fulfillment I'd not hold it against them. Otherwise, yeah, huge red flag.
 

Chromie

Member
Dec 4, 2017
1,263
Divinity: Original Sin: The Board Game


Neat. :o
Wow, this is an expensive game. I don’t feel good about it myself unlike with Oathsworn backing at such a high price.

But watching their video is great. I love the initiative tracker and the AP system looks good. I’ll keep my eye on it but story focused RPGs are not something I need more of.
 
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Rufio

Member
Oct 27, 2017
149
So i just bought Arkham Asylum the card game core set for me and my girlfriend to try and get into. It will be here friday.

Any first time tips for us? I'm still pretty basic when it comes to games, Spirit island is the most advanced game i've played, and my gf is still on azul tier games.

But this looks interested and i'm hoping she can get into it.
 

Llyranor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,740
So i just bought Arkham Asylum the card game core set for me and my girlfriend to try and get into. It will be here friday.

Any first time tips for us? I'm still pretty basic when it comes to games, Spirit island is the most advanced game i've played, and my gf is still on azul tier games.

But this looks interested and i'm hoping she can get into it.
I'm assuming you mean Arkham Horror.

If you can handle Spirit Island, you'll be fine.

There's no shame in playing on Easy (especially with just the core set and not many deck customization options).

This is a good overview https://youtu.be/zzliu_-xNNQ

We have an OT too! https://www.resetera.com/threads/arkham-horror-the-card-game-ot-cards-of-cthulhu.430/
 

Llyranor

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,740
Are they merely the designers or the publishers that were in charge of those campaigns? If they designed the games but didn't have anything to do with fulfillment I'd not hold it against them. Otherwise, yeah, huge red flag.
I'll let the comments speak for themselves:
 

Nappuccino

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
5,197
So i just bought Arkham Asylum the card game core set for me and my girlfriend to try and get into. It will be here friday.

Any first time tips for us? I'm still pretty basic when it comes to games, Spirit island is the most advanced game i've played, and my gf is still on azul tier games.

But this looks interested and i'm hoping she can get into it.
The core set is nice in that it basically tells you how to build two characters. The hardest part is finding the right cards cause there are a lot of cards lol.
 
Oct 26, 2017
488
Hey all! Wanted to check the temperature on some games with everyone. I know these two things are vastly different. Interested in Twilight Imperium 4th Ed - my shop is selling it for 130 which is greatly reduced from even the online prices.

Also interested in Mansions of Madness 2nd. These two are about as different as can be, but not looking for an immediate comparison, just impressions of either game. Really loving the theme of Mansions but the more social, diplomatic mechanics of TI are really compelling.

Additionally, wondering how different TI is to something like Scythe. I already have Scythe, and if I feel like it’s servicing my multiplayer strategy needs just fine, the investment might be in vain.

Thanks for any and all replies!
Hey, I know I'm late to the party on this question, but I feel that TI4 is worth a purchase even if you can't get it to the table all that often. This, of course, depends on your funds, gaming group, and sense of time.

I've owned the game for almost two years, I've played it twice, and I've loaned it out to a friend from our group who was able to play it twice as well. Our first game we played incorrectly and took WAY longer per turn than we should have, necessitating abandoning a game after a solid 8 hours of play. Our second game ended early because folks had to leave for an emergency at home, and there's just no way to pare things down mid-game. My two unfinished games of TI4 were more enthralling than most other games I've finished. It all depends on what you're looking for, and YMMV, of course.

So no, I have never finished a game of Twilight Imperium. It is still my favorite board game experience (although Spirit Island is creeping real close). I realize this makes me sound insane, but the technological and diplomatic complexities to the game are unparalleled as far as I'm concerned, the theme is transcendently good, and the asymmetrical gameplay is some of the coolest I've ever seen.

If you can't play it often, I'd not buy it at full price, but if you set up a camelcamelcamel price watch for it on Amazon, you'll eventually find it for closer to $100. You'd be a real dumb dumb to not buy it at that price.
 

absolutbro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,457
Hey all! Wanted to check the temperature on some games with everyone. I know these two things are vastly different. Interested in Twilight Imperium 4th Ed - my shop is selling it for 130 which is greatly reduced from even the online prices.

Also interested in Mansions of Madness 2nd. These two are about as different as can be, but not looking for an immediate comparison, just impressions of either game. Really loving the theme of Mansions but the more social, diplomatic mechanics of TI are really compelling.

Additionally, wondering how different TI is to something like Scythe. I already have Scythe, and if I feel like it’s servicing my multiplayer strategy needs just fine, the investment might be in vain.

Thanks for any and all replies!
I know I'm super late to this question, but having played both TI3 (own TI4 but haven't gotten it to the table yet) and MoM2 (and Scythe) I figured I'd give you my thoughts:

Individual game thoughts:

Twilight Imperium is probably one of my favorite board games of all time. Yes, it takes a long time to play and yes it takes a LOT of space on the table, but to me it is very, very worth both. The closest comparison I can think of is "If you liked Axis and Allies but wanted a bit more on the social/political side, TI is the game for you". Much of the placing, moving, building, recruiting and upkeep of forces is very similar to A&A. The scientific development, political and "other stuff to do" sides of TI are far more robust than A&A though, and create an entire second layer to the game which A&A lacks. The secret and public objectives add tension to the game, since you can watch someone slowly advance towards to target number of Victory Points, but you're never quite sure when they're maneuvering towards their Secret Objective (or indeed if they even are). Action Cards and similar abilities add just enough mystery that you can never be 100% certain you know what your opponents are up to, which keeps the game from descending into "we know so and so will win, but can't really do much about it and have to play out the next two hours knowing that's the case". I love TI. The first time I played it, a 6 player game with my friends, took 6 or 7 hours and I got my ass whooped, but I was completely hooked. I pre-ordered TI4, but that group of friends moved apart and none of my local friends are into really heavy games, so sadly it sits on my shelf for now.

Mansions of Madness 2: I love dungeon crawlers. I love co-op games. I love Arkham Horror, both the LCG and the original super huge and heavy board game. I was also one of the few people in my group that enjoyed Mansions of Madness 1, even if I recognize that the game had some serious issues (especially wrt timing). Mansions of Madness 2 does away with some of that, moving things to app control, and adding replay value (which MoM1 sort of lacked). Mansions of Madness 2 is a fun game, although of all the "ap controlled" dungeon crawlers, it's my least favorite. (I'll take Descent 2e or Imperial Assault over Mansions of Madness 2). I'm not sure why I don't like MoM2 as much as I did MoM1, but I do still enjoy it.

Twilight Imperium vs. Scythe: both games will definitely scratch that "multiplayer strategy" itch. Scythe I think is the shorter of the two games and certainly plays better at a lower player count (although I've done 3 and 4 player TI games without issue; 5 is the odd number for TI). What makes TI a stronger "multiplayer strategy" game to me, is that in Scythe you can make it to end game without ever really directly interacting with another player. You build up and build up and grab your Factory action and just sort of 'do your own thing'. TI that is much, much harder to do. Many of the initative/action cards (not the small red action cards, but the 1-8 cards) directly create player interactions: trade pacts or (one of my favorite parts of the game) the political scene. Even if you never go into fleet combat with another player, you will very frequently come head to head with someone on a political vote.

If you're enjoying Scythe and find yourself only rarely playing multiplayer strategy games, Scythe is a good solid game. I even bought it on Steam because I don't get to play my physical copy much. That said, given a choice between playing Scythe and TI I will take TI 100% of the time. While I am not suggesting you just flat buy it before you try it, I would see if anyone in your play group might own a copy (even of TI3) you could play. I think it would be worth your while.
 

SillyEskimo

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
2,887
I apologise for the glare but Cthulhu: Death May Die just arrived! The Unspeakable Box is gorgeous!

Kicking myself for cancelling this one. I even had a pledge with the cheapest big statue because I was so fast the day it opened! I know I made the right decision though. I just have too many miniatures to paint to add another giant project to the list.
 
Dec 1, 2017
109
I think I'm going to jump on the KD:M train on Black Friday if there's a sale.

I know the core box has more than enough content, but I've read something (one link I can't remember, maybe a reddit post?) that explained how a few of the expansions make the overall experience much better; i.e. Gorm's expansion is supposed to be good, Spidicules is meh, etc.

Anyone have any recommendations? Just looking for the content expansions, not the character expansions.
 

nuffDREW4two

Member
Oct 27, 2017
79
Anyone have any recommendations? Just looking for the content expansions, not the character expansions.
As you've probably read, top three are usually identified as Sunstalker, Gorm and Dragon King - prioritize those three first (most people say Sunstalker if you're getting just one). Gorm as an alternate lvl 1 quarry, and Sunstalker and Dragon King for their alternate campaigns.

Dung Beetle Knight is also pretty cool, and either Manhunter or Slenderman are nice as a different nemesis. Flower Knight is okay if you're having some difficulty in the early game, but don't go out of your way for it. Some tend to avoid Lion God since it can be pretty punishing.

And consensus for bottom three is for the most part Spidicules, Lion Knight and way at the bottom, Nightmare Tree.

Lots of game in the core, and you'll probably get 100hrs out of that before you consider adding in an expansion.
 

dabbert

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
214
Yeah just to echo the above, Gorm is the best just for the extra lvl 1 and also all the other stuff it adds. Then either Sunstalker or Dragon King. I wasn't a big fan of the Sunstalker Campaign compared to vanilla, but it's certainly interesting and you can go full anime with the skills the sun warriors can get.
 

Mikeside

Member
Oct 25, 2017
693
UK
So, just based on the tutorial, it's a very wordy, dark story adventure game with combat and diplomacy decks that you draw from for encounters. A lot of the rules aren't covered in the basic tutorial so I've still got some reading to do, but the story already has its hooks in me from the off
 

Nappuccino

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
5,197
So I got a laminator for board games, after laminating 2 sheets the thing jammed and I can’t get the sheet out :/
That's such a bummer . . . which one was it? I had ordered the Amazon Basics the other day, but Amazon opted to return it on its own. I would like to pick up a budget laminator for obvious reasons.
 

SixPointEight

Member
Oct 28, 2017
841
Ordered Brass:Birmingham yesterday. Wanted a good economics game to replace power grid (which I like but I’ve played too much of), hopefully it does it!
 

Edge

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,346
Celle, Germany
After 3 1/2 years, the last stretch goals and expansion orders of the "Dark Souls - The Board Game" board game finally arrived yesterday.

Holy f'n shit, this took a while. The main game and some stretch goals got released after 1 year, but the bought expansion and rest of the stretch goals took them 2 1/2 more years. I have no ideas what the heck happened there, but I'm glad it's finally done.





 

Nappuccino

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
5,197
After 3 1/2 years, the last stretch goals and expansion orders of the "Dark Souls - The Board Game" board game finally arrived yesterday.

Holy f'n shit, this took a while. The main game and some stretch goals got released after 1 year, but the bought expansion and rest of the stretch goals took them 2 1/2 more years. I have no ideas what the heck happened there, but I'm glad it's finally done.





They all look great, in the boxes at least. I'm guessing a lot of the expansions weren't play tested before the KS.
 

Chromie

Member
Dec 4, 2017
1,263
After 3 1/2 years, the last stretch goals and expansion orders of the "Dark Souls - The Board Game" board game finally arrived yesterday.

Holy f'n shit, this took a while. The main game and some stretch goals got released after 1 year, but the bought expansion and rest of the stretch goals took them 2 1/2 more years. I have no ideas what the heck happened there, but I'm glad it's finally done.





Oh man. A lot of boxes. Are you going to play it or try to sell them?
 

Brohan

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
352
Never thought of selling them, we bought it to play it but we never tried any expansion so far and it's hard to really get into it and to find people for it. xD
Is the base game any good?

Looking for some new boardgames now that my group is almost done with the Gloomhaven campaign. Planning to order Pandemic Legacy season 1 but am waiting to see if i can snatch a black friday deal and was looking at Tained Grail but i don't think there is any way to get it so that sucks.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,021
After 3 1/2 years, the last stretch goals and expansion orders of the "Dark Souls - The Board Game" board game finally arrived yesterday.

Holy f'n shit, this took a while. The main game and some stretch goals got released after 1 year, but the bought expansion and rest of the stretch goals took them 2 1/2 more years. I have no ideas what the heck happened there, but I'm glad it's finally done.





Holy
Smokes
Wow what a haul!
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,021
Finally got a chance to play megacity. I’m awful at dexterity games but somehow managed not to knock everything over! We had a blast and it’s nice when it’s a close game. We were all within 2 points of the next person
 

Rover

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,450
Let me talk a little bit about Navajo Wars, a great game that just recently came back in print, which you might have missed in between all the KS fluff.





What is it?
Navajo Wars is a solo game (with a 2p variant) that retells the history of the struggle of the Navajo people (also known as the Diné) to defend their land and culture against colonizing forces of Spain, Mexico, and the United States. You can play various scenarios against any one of those empires, including a long scenario against all three in succession.

Is it a wargame? And why should I care if I don't like wargames?
While this game does have a number of elements commonly found in wargames (such as rolling and modifying dice rolls for certain battle outcomes), it combines them with more strategic resource management you might find in a eurogame. In fact, you spend a bulk of this game managing more of the familial, cultural aspects of your people - expanding families, holding positions on the land, maintaining animals, and growing crops. There is a light and quiet "eurogame" facet to this game of just living your life and slowly building stuff up. It's when the enemy raids come that the game dramatically shifts into more of a tactical one, and tests your planning and resolve to fend off and avoid devastation.

This blend of mechanics really rounds out the experience for me as a great entry point into war and history-based games in general. It's a game where every action in the game has some thematic element to it, there is a fair mix of strategy and luck, and it doesn't over-indulge on war as a means to an end.


How does it play?
First of all, I should mention that the rulebook is really good, and comes with an excellent tutorial book that walks you through several turns, asking you at key points to go read a relevant passage or two from the rulebook to understand what is happening. This was really well-done, and it's like having the designer personally teach you the game.

I think a good point of comparison for this game is Spirit Island, not just because of the similar theme (although you actually play as the natives here, not an intermediary). Spirit Island's enemy is driven by a conveyer belt of cards that tells you where they're going and what they're going to do. This game has that on steroids.

The enemy here works through a conveyer belt of instructions that it can execute if its built up enough AP (you can see this on the board, the bottom right). This gives you an overview of the next 2-4 turns for the enemy, but these counters can flip or swap with the row of inactive counters next to it, meaning you can't exactly predict what's going to happen. The best way to push back on this is to try to slow down how many AP the enemy can get, but its a matter of holding back the dam before it bursts (and you better be ready for it when it does).

It's this mix of strategy and luck that really exemplifies the mood of the entire game. You have ample room to plan, but you need to stay flexible enough to react to these fake-outs.





The board mostly consists of this map with different territories (it's presented as a makeshift map using a leather cloth and colored stones), and the enemy will work its way down these paths, setting up missions and forts that slowly sap your culture away. Along the bottom is your family display, where each family can have a man, woman and child (and these get added/taken away as stuff happens in the game).

One of the interesting mechanics of the game is the "Passage of Time". In a typical eurogame, you expect that at the end of each turn, you will do administrative things like feed your people, breed animals, etc. This game makes it optional - you burn an entire turn to add new family members, breed animals, and feed everybody. Do it too soon, and you will reap little to no benefit, but timed just right will give you a huge boost. It's cool that this game has managed to turn a rather boring feature in most games into a meaningful decision with somewhat of a push-your-luck aspect to it.


There's quite a bit of stuff to do in the box
I tend to not focus too much on "content" in the box, because my favorite games are highly replayable through randomization, rather than a bunch of one-time use scenarios and such. With that said, this game offers a lot with a relatively small set of components (it's gotta be under 100 counters in the game, and about 80 cards total).

I just recently managed to beat the easiest scenario in this game (a shortened version of the Spanish scenario), and I noticed around my 4th game that they had all played out pretty differently, because of how much variety gets generated through the enemy instruction thing, and how the deck comes out and what you decide to do with it. And I still have the longer scenario just for Spain. Mexico and the US come with their own separate instruction counters and slightly rules tweaks that will change this game even more.


Should you buy this game?
I wont pretend that this game is for everyone. But as far as I've played, this game excels in the categories it belongs to.

As a solo game, it's a big, full board game with interesting decisions and a good amount of complexity. It's also not hard to run the AI at all, and it is one of the best solo systems I've seen in the number of solo games I've played.

As a historical wargame, the topic is a lot more human and interesting than a big conventional war, and it's got more of a well-rounded "sim" focus than just battling (I haven't even mentioned that this game has a little tech tree system in it).

I recommend this game if you're curious about wargames in general, but are intimidated by the more complex stuff or find straightforward war, as a theme, to be boring. This game's theme comes alive in its mechanics and it's about growing and surviving and pushing back on colonial invasion.
 

Lyng

Writer at Joypad.dk
Verified
Oct 27, 2017
1,648
Let me talk a little bit about Navajo Wars, a great game that just recently came back in print, which you might have missed in between all the KS fluff.





What is it?
Navajo Wars is a solo game (with a 2p variant) that retells the history of the struggle of the Navajo people (also known as the Diné) to defend their land and culture against colonizing forces of Spain, Mexico, and the United States. You can play various scenarios against any one of those empires, including a long scenario against all three in succession.

Is it a wargame? And why should I care if I don't like wargames?
While this game does have a number of elements commonly found in wargames (such as rolling and modifying dice rolls for certain battle outcomes), it combines them with more strategic resource management you might find in a eurogame. In fact, you spend a bulk of this game managing more of the familial, cultural aspects of your people - expanding families, holding positions on the land, maintaining animals, and growing crops. There is a light and quiet "eurogame" facet to this game of just living your life and slowly building stuff up. It's when the enemy raids come that the game dramatically shifts into more of a tactical one, and tests your planning and resolve to fend off and avoid devastation.

This blend of mechanics really rounds out the experience for me as a great entry point into war and history-based games in general. It's a game where every action in the game has some thematic element to it, there is a fair mix of strategy and luck, and it doesn't over-indulge on war as a means to an end.


How does it play?
First of all, I should mention that the rulebook is really good, and comes with an excellent tutorial book that walks you through several turns, asking you at key points to go read a relevant passage or two from the rulebook to understand what is happening. This was really well-done, and it's like having the designer personally teach you the game.

I think a good point of comparison for this game is Spirit Island, not just because of the similar theme (although you actually play as the natives here, not an intermediary). Spirit Island's enemy is driven by a conveyer belt of cards that tells you where they're going and what they're going to do. This game has that on steroids.

The enemy here works through a conveyer belt of instructions that it can execute if its built up enough AP (you can see this on the board, the bottom right). This gives you an overview of the next 2-4 turns for the enemy, but these counters can flip or swap with the row of inactive counters next to it, meaning you can't exactly predict what's going to happen. The best way to push back on this is to try to slow down how many AP the enemy can get, but its a matter of holding back the dam before it bursts (and you better be ready for it when it does).

It's this mix of strategy and luck that really exemplifies the mood of the entire game. You have ample room to plan, but you need to stay flexible enough to react to these fake-outs.





The board mostly consists of this map with different territories (it's presented as a makeshift map using a leather cloth and colored stones), and the enemy will work its way down these paths, setting up missions and forts that slowly sap your culture away. Along the bottom is your family display, where each family can have a man, woman and child (and these get added/taken away as stuff happens in the game).

One of the interesting mechanics of the game is the "Passage of Time". In a typical eurogame, you expect that at the end of each turn, you will do administrative things like feed your people, breed animals, etc. This game makes it optional - you burn an entire turn to add new family members, breed animals, and feed everybody. Do it too soon, and you will reap little to no benefit, but timed just right will give you a huge boost. It's cool that this game has managed to turn a rather boring feature in most games into a meaningful decision with somewhat of a push-your-luck aspect to it.


There's quite a bit of stuff to do in the box
I tend to not focus too much on "content" in the box, because my favorite games are highly replayable through randomization, rather than a bunch of one-time use scenarios and such. With that said, this game offers a lot with a relatively small set of components (it's gotta be under 100 counters in the game, and about 80 cards total).

I just recently managed to beat the easiest scenario in this game (a shortened version of the Spanish scenario), and I noticed around my 4th game that they had all played out pretty differently, because of how much variety gets generated through the enemy instruction thing, and how the deck comes out and what you decide to do with it. And I still have the longer scenario just for Spain. Mexico and the US come with their own separate instruction counters and slightly rules tweaks that will change this game even more.


Should you buy this game?
I wont pretend that this game is for everyone. But as far as I've played, this game excels in the categories it belongs to.

As a solo game, it's a big, full board game with interesting decisions and a good amount of complexity. It's also not hard to run the AI at all, and it is one of the best solo systems I've seen in the number of solo games I've played.

As a historical wargame, the topic is a lot more human and interesting than a big conventional war, and it's got more of a well-rounded "sim" focus than just battling (I haven't even mentioned that this game has a little tech tree system in it).

I recommend this game if you're curious about wargames in general, but are intimidated by the more complex stuff or find straightforward war, as a theme, to be boring. This game's theme comes alive in its mechanics and it's about growing and surviving and pushing back on colonial invasion.
Great write up. When I talked to Tony the other day I had the choice to review this or Tank Duel. After reading this I am sad I chose Tank Duel :P Oh and sidenote: The designer of Navajo Wars (and Comancheria) Joel Toppen is a pretty great guy as well.
 

Rover

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,450
Great write up. When I talked to Tony the other day I had the choice to review this or Tank Duel. After reading this I am sad I chose Tank Duel :P Oh and sidenote: The designer of Navajo Wars (and Comancheria) Joel Toppen is a pretty great guy as well.
Yeah the designer seems like a nice guy.

He includes an interesting backstory in the rulebook about why he decided to make the game, as he grew up as one of the only white kids in a Navajo community, and pretty plainly admits how wrong he used to be about the Navajo history before he finally opened his eyes.

It was a pretty refreshing and earnest little read after reading some essays in other rulebooks with notoriously grandstanding/false narratives put in them because nobody stops him (not gonna invoke the name, because he'll come here and post a defense).

Also thanks for reading the write up! I read one of your reviews recently after you came back, too
 

Lyng

Writer at Joypad.dk
Verified
Oct 27, 2017
1,648
Yeah the designer seems like a nice guy.

He includes an interesting backstory in the rulebook about why he decided to make the game, as he grew up as one of the only white kids in a Navajo community, and pretty plainly admits how wrong he used to be about the Navajo history before he finally opened his eyes.

It was a pretty refreshing and earnest little read after reading some essays in other rulebooks with notoriously grandstanding/false narratives put in them because nobody stops him (not gonna invoke the name, because he'll come here and post a defense).

Also thanks for reading the write up! I read one of your reviews recently after you came back, too
Yeah Joel is a good dude. And thats what I love about his approach to this very delicate subject. Its not just a white mans version of the native american struggles, but instead he aims to tell the real story.