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branded products for little children

Dec 17, 2017
144
#1
Today I used my electric toothbrush and my little one (2 1/2) said that he also wanted an electric one. OK I said.
Now I wanted to buy one for little teeth and it's so hard to find one that isn't branded to death with cars/frozen/star wars.

So this was all local shops, because you know the environment and stuff, I tried to buy this shit not on amazon/online.
Back home I look for alternatives and they are either branded by advertisement or gender, both of which is fine I guess but not the product I wanted to get.
The unbranded gendered stuff is rather no-name (no problem with that) but more expensive, double the price in fact.
The name-product is branded (and gendered by franchise) but cheap due to coupons plus I can buy local.

Probably go for the branded stuff and try to not make a big deal out of it or scratch it off somehow.

I can fathom some "no fun allowed" comments are coming, but I don't want my child to be influenced/manipulated by advertisement when he is not able to defend himself. A lot of people can't do this as grown-ups. I like star wars myself and are happy if he likes it too someday, but there is no reason to brand non-toy products to further brand recognition. A kid should not care if there is the frozen character on their toothbrush and they actually don't unless they see people making a big fuss about it. I really wish for some legislation that would prohibit or limit this shit. Don't get me started on this firefighter guy and the rescue dogs and whatnot. The purest form of consumer manipulation...

Are you annoyed that it is hard to buy kids stuff that doesn't tries to adopt them as future customers or force the parents to be surrogate customers for their children?
Do you care?
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,455
#2
I've noticed this over the past few years, roleplay toys like little kitchen appliances and power tools are being produced with branding on them like Bosch and Dyson.
On one hand I think it can be cool for the kids as it adds an extra level of realism to the toys, but I'm under no illusions that it's anything other than an attempt to drill brand loyalty into them from an early age.
 
Oct 27, 2017
6,483
#3
Buy one in a simple colour and customize it at home.
Duct-tape, rope, glitters, stickers, etc. whatever he or she likes.

Also, don't overcomplicate your life too much.
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
1,026
#6
We try to avoid branded stuff like clothes and toys. With clothes it is especially hard since we're always shopping clearance rack for deals.

My daughter was gifted frozen things before she every even knew the movie existed.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,850
#9
Yeah, this crap became almost unavoidable over the last few years. Nowadays, its almost impossible to buy anything aimed at children that isn't part of some multi-billion dollar brand. It's kinda perverted that we're raising our children to consume certain goods from this early in their lives. Sadly most people just don't get it. Or rather, don't get why I'd decline these sorts of gifts.
 
OP
OP
Dec 17, 2017
144
#11
My son loves his pink Barbie toothbrush. You don't have to pay attention to the genders.
I have no problem about the gendering of products, well actually I have a problem with that, because I rather have neutral or at least more than blue/pink to choose from. But that is not my problem right now, it's the branding/marketing involved.

Whatever makes my life easier getting her to brush her teeth.
Yeah at what price is convenience more valuable than your child's well being. Because that is what you pay with. The same with those kids TV shows that only exist to sell this stuff. Well yeah, it's convenient, but instead you raising your children, now it's the makers of the TV show and their only concern is to raise your child to like their stuff. And you to buy it. I know I made a jump from the brush -> to the show but the point still stands.

I imagine your kid is more accessible to troll labeled products, because they are the things from the toothbrush. I see the point of using labels as a method to motivate your child to brush teeth, but I think it the motivation should not be part of a business plan.
 
Oct 27, 2017
961
#13
This is probably going to sound snarky, but it’s honest: for the specific example of a kid-branded electric toothbrush, just forget it and stick with non-electric. Generally, stick with basic, generic goods and you will be much less in the thrall of big corporations.
 
Oct 31, 2017
2,752
#14
I have no problem about the gendering of products, well actually I have a problem with that, because I rather have neutral or at least more than blue/pink to choose from. But that is not my problem right now, it's the branding/marketing involved.



Yeah at what price is convenience more valuable than your child's well being. Because that is what you pay with. The same with those kids TV shows that only exist to sell this stuff. Well yeah, it's convenient, but instead you raising your children, now it's the makers of the TV show and their only concern is to raise your child to like their stuff. And you to buy it. I know I made a jump from the brush -> to the show but the point still stands.

I imagine your kid is more accessible to troll labeled products, because they are the things from the toothbrush. I see the point of using labels as a method to motivate your child to brush teeth, but I think it the motivation should not be part of a business plan.
Who cares if they like some TV show and the show branded TV show? Like we didn't like Ninja turtles or WWF or some shit? It's not a big deal. Kids like that stuff and it gives them something to relate to with other kids. There are tons of things to shield your kids from wrt corporations and consumerism. This is not one of them.
 
Oct 26, 2017
13,392
#15
Who cares if they like some TV show and the show branded TV show? Like we didn't like Ninja turtles or WWF or some shit? It's not a big deal. Kids like that stuff and it gives them something to relate to with other kids. There are tons of things to shield your kids from wrt corporations and consumerism. This is not one of them.
Yeah, besides, they will get more marketing messages from media, than just a store or product. A product itself is not super effective marketing.

Play offense, not just defense. Talk to you kids about quality and price, etc. Obviously, this will be age appropriate throughout their childhood. Kids aren't thinking about this stuff at the level you are OP.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,879
#16
You’re asking the wrong folks, OP.
We’re worshippers of Marvel and Star Wars and Sony and Nintendo here. We were all indoctrinated with consumerism and branding at a young age.
 
Oct 27, 2017
961
#17
Who cares if they like some TV show and the show branded TV show? Like we didn't like Ninja turtles or WWF or some shit? It's not a big deal. Kids like that stuff and it gives them something to relate to with other kids. There are tons of things to shield your kids from wrt corporations and consumerism. This is not one of them.
Nah, this is where it starts. Kids are absolutely better off not being brainwashed into being little corporate foot soldiers.
 
OP
OP
Dec 17, 2017
144
#18
Kids aren't thinking about this stuff at the level you are OP.
Yes, but isn't this the point I am trying to make? To protect my child from advertisement aimed at young children and their subconcious?

I would talk to my kid about it, but he is only 2 1/2 years old. I strongly doubt he would understand.

My kid does not watch TV or is obsessed with popular kid toys, so he doesn't relate the toothbrush stuff to cars the movie because he does not know the movie, but the motif and placement of logo disgusts me.

Btw. I chose to not get a brush until I find a gender and branding free one. Will be more expensive but I can sleep better.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,268
#20
Yes, but isn't this the point I am trying to make? To protect my child from advertisement aimed at young children and their subconcious?

I would talk to my kid about it, but he is only 2 1/2 years old. I strongly doubt he would understand.

My kid does not watch TV or is obsessed with popular kid toys, so he doesn't relate the toothbrush stuff to cars the movie because he does not know the movie, but the motif and placement of logo disgusts me.

Btw. I chose to not get a brush until I find a gender and branding free one. Will be more expensive but I can sleep better.
Just wrap some tape around it if you really want to cover up the branding.
 
Oct 25, 2017
12,268
#26
Like remove all the tags and unstich the emroidery?
My wife does this with car seats/strollers/etc...not because we hate branding, but because it looks better without all of the stickers and tags.

You know what I mean!

I’m sure you don’t think you were brainwashed into only liking those things.
Nah, I was just joshing around.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,933
#27
Are electric toothbrushes appropriate for a 2 year old?

I would just say Daddy needs a special toothbrush for this teeth and buy the kid an unbranded normal one if it's so concerning. Or tape it up like others are saying.

Honestly I think the best way forward with something like this is to let them have the branded whatever if they want it and talk to them about media/advertising.
 
Oct 27, 2017
609
#28
I hate that as well. There are like 12 intellectual properties on band aid now. Same product, just a different look. Ridiculous. When I do buy these kinds of branded products I try to get the ‘girl’ one for my son. If I’m not progressive on the branding at least that makes me feel I am a little bit on the gendered part of it.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,850
#29
[...], I don’t see how they’re being indoctrinated. Kids grow out of what they like when they were younger.
because children flock to whatever they know and recognize. If they grew up with mickey faces on all of their cloths, chances are they will consume lots of disney stuff while possibly ignoring various other alternative offerings that aren't advertised to hell and back. It's just poison for a diverse media landscape.
 
Oct 30, 2017
1,222
#30
Let your kids find their own interest and wear and use what they want because these are all completely trivial things. Dictating that they can't have a micky mouse tooth brush at age 2 is completely fucking absurd to me. Everything my kids loved at 2 stopped caring by age 3 and so on and so on. Let your kids be, well, kids.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,316
#32
Let your kids find their own interest and wear and use what they want because these are all completely trivial things. Dictating that they can't have a micky mouse tooth brush at age 2 is completely fucking absurd to me. Everything my kids loved at 2 stopped caring by age 3 and so on and so on. Let your kids be, well, kids.
This reminds me of the fact that I met one of my lifelong best friends because in the lunch room in 2nd grade, he saw that I had a TMNT lunchbox and he sat down next to me to show me his and compare them. He was in a different class, I probably never would have met him otherwise. There's something to be said for allowing your kids to share interests with their peers and engage in the common culture.

I do however agree that it can go to the extreme and it is not a good thing if your kid is eschews everything else in life in favor of watching Paw Patrol all day.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,832
#33
It's a fool's errand to try and create this bubble to control what your kid is exposed to when it comes to children characters and themes. I've learned that after trying and realizing that you can't control what they see and hear 24/7 and hearing them talk about things that they got exposed to that you never even realized they saw.