BREXIT |OT2.0| A parade of endless victories for Boris Johnson

JediTimeBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,112
Did The Brexit Company ever reveal their funding sources? Or their manifesto? They promised both after the EU elections. The scenario smells a lot like Trump and his tax returns.

Also re: Watson, he has a point. If the Tories get in on a tiny majority again they'll spin it as 'the will of the people for no deal', the Brexit question needs to be separated from the election.
Yeah agreed. 2nd ref is the best solution; but once again, what options will be on the ballot? Will it be Remain/Leave (w/wo deal)/Leave with deal ?
 

null

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,793
Tom Watson can say he wants a second ref all he wants but THERE'S NO WAY TO GET IT WITH THIS PARLIAMENT

How many times does it need to be voted down before people get the message?
 

Ando

Member
Apr 21, 2018
189
Tom Watson can say he wants a second ref all he wants but THERE'S NO WAY TO GET IT WITH THIS PARLIAMENT

How many times does it need to be voted down before people get the message?
thinking you can get a referendum in this parliament when there’s no majority just for the idea - let alone once you choose what’s on the ballot and who is in the sufferage - before you even get to the barrier of the wholly hostile executive looking to undermine it, is hilarious

it’s a unicorn so large it genuinely makes me more sympathetic to the comparatively reasonable demands of the ERG
 

Lump

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,767
thinking you can get a referendum in this parliament when there’s no majority just for the idea - let alone once you choose what’s on the ballot and who is in the sufferage - before you even get to the barrier of the wholly hostile executive looking to undermine it, is hilarious

it’s a unicorn so large it genuinely makes me more sympathetic to the comparatively reasonable demands of the ERG
Got to be cheeky and propose a Continued Referendum instead, ask what kind of Brexit people want - No Deal Brexit, May Deal Brexit, or 5 Minute Temporary Wink Wink Brexit
 

Acorn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,004
Scotland
Man, all this crazy shit just seems like another day these days. It's been normalised, but then sometimes I snap out of it and I'm just fucking bewildered at the times we live in.
 

8bit

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,108
This shit is dangerous, no media should cover it.

They get to prescreen questions so nothing serious is asked and bypass the scrutiny of the media.
And they get a load of data about regions/voters interested in the Conservatives that can be exploited, bombarded and pseudo-deanonymised based on gov.uk.
 

31GhostsIV

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,932
The fucking nerve of Johnson to have one of his phoney 'people's' PMQ streams on the day his fuckery stopped Parliamentary PMQs happening.
 

Vagabundo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,038
It really doesn't, though, does it? It's not enough to be statistically significant, and it's a narrow enough margin that it can be affected by every little bit of news that pushes things one way or the other (whether that news is true or printed on the side of a bus). To make major constitutional changes you need to be pretty sure that another vote the next week wouldn't result in people wanting to change things back.
Oh I agree, couldn't turn down the opporunity to be sarky though. Need a supramajority for anything Ireland related and should have been the same for Brexit. It literally shouldn't be legal for the government to allow a simple majority in cases like that just because it suits them.
In theory I'd agree, however a super majority would be too much maybe a 55% with a 60% turnout. If it was a super-majority we wouldn't have equal right to marriage or abortion.

However the terms are set at this point and it is a simple majority for the border polls.

I remember the GFA being negotiated, I watched the news every night and for months after it was never a sure thing or that it would stick. The wording was the best they could get at the time and a lot of it is ambiguous on purpose because it was the only way to get it through both communities.

There will be massive challenges when it passes and I expect it too sooner or later, a hard Brexit will just make it sooner, we're going to have to deal with the Unionists at some point and come to terms.
 

iapetus

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,383
There will be massive challenges when it passes and I expect it too sooner or later, a hard Brexit will just make it sooner, we're going to have to deal with the Unionists at some point and come to terms.
Post-Brexit I'd be in favour of integration - I don't see the benefit to Northern Ireland or the K (previously UK) of dragging Northern Ireland down with us. Scottish independence would be more harmful, I suspect. I'd still rather vote in the SNP nationwide and move the seat of government from London to Edinburgh.
 

JediTimeBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,112
"I'll see you next time...err, well not that I'll see you, but you'll see me". Lmao, he couldn't even hold a 15 minute conversation, without a gaff lol.
 

Vagabundo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,038
Post-Brexit I'd be in favour of integration - I don't see the benefit to Northern Ireland or the K (previously UK) of dragging Northern Ireland down with us. Scottish independence would be more harmful, I suspect. I'd still rather vote in the SNP nationwide and move the seat of government from London to Edinburgh.
Integration is going to be a massive pain in the arse for everyone. We'll probably need to do huge local government reforms, healthcare (I'm not sure how people will feel about having to pay for GPs again), etc.

Culturally we're all living together after a fashion especially those in the border counties.But I'm 45 and I've been around the world (EU, OZ, ..)and all over the republic of ireland, but never set foot in Northern Ireland and I doubt I'm hugely unusual.
 

kradical

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,432

Kwasi Kwarteng, Nigel Farage, and Andrew Neil. Good to see all sides getting represented on the BBC, from the far right, to the extreme far right.
 

Acorn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,004
Scotland
The BBC has done more for Farage than anyone else, he was booked repeatedly until he actually caught on enough to warrant being booked (but still not to the extent he was).
 

JediTimeBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,112
Even if Yellowhammer documents are released, I wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of the typical Torie voters / Brexiteers, stay in denial, and/or harp on about "worst case".
 

danowat

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,906
Even if Yellowhammer documents are released, I wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of the typical Torie voters / Brexiteers, stay in denial, and/or harp on about "worst case".
You just have to read the comments on any Brexit article to see that people, even some on the remain side, are completely fucking bonkers.
 

Palette Swap

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,522
Depending on the extent of the damage described in Yellowhammer, it could seriously raise a question of moral, if not legal, responsibility.

There should be a point where as a government senior official, if you see credible reports that your policy will explicitly lead to deaths and damage, you choose to hide this information from the public and push ahead with that policy by bypassing elect institutions, you should face serious consequences.

This is all of course in a sane, transparent and accountable world.
 

phisheep

Member
Oct 26, 2017
863
This happened just over the road from my shop today ...



... that picture is from after all the shards of plate glass and rubble had been cleared away. It made a helluva bang (but thankfully nobody was injured).

The driver was sober and acting in what he thought was everybody's best interests but made a really dumb mistake.

For some reason I thought it an appropriate metaphor for something-or-other.