Canada PoliERA |OT| Two Years of Sunny Days? That’s Scheer Madness!

bremon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,145
Jesus Christ, I miss a day or two of this thread and it feels like 7 months out from an election we’ve already got Bernie Bro logic in here. Remind me to buckle my seatbelt for this wild ride.
 

Hours Left

Member
Oct 26, 2017
7,093
Who's the "you" in that statement, exactly? Considering it was a direct response to something I posted, I'd like a bit of clarity on that.
Anyone who fits the description. Whether or not that includes you specifically I have no idea, since I don’t know your life.

If you/they (ie. anyone) has lived facing the varied discrimination and roadblocks of being a minority, then I’d expect said person to be more in touch with how tenuous the hold is on any gains we’ve made to equality.

We don’t need to walk on eggshells.
 
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Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
995
lmao the Feds have contributed just $1.5M to the City of Vancouver's big anti-poverty housing effort holy shit. Great job spending those infrastructure dollars we went into deficit for you guys.

As Vancouver's 600th modular home fills up, city looks for next 600
...
This week marks a milestone for Vancouver’s pre-fabricated homes, as residents move into the final of 10 sites, totalling 606 units, hitting the target set out at the program’s launch in September 2017. And while those tenants settle into their new homes, city staff are currently assessing possible sites for the next 600 modular homes. There’s little question the demand is there, in a city that counted 2,181 “residents facing homelessness” last year.

But even if the city figures out where to put those homes, the question remains of how to fund them.

Vancouver’s initial round of 600 units (after an earlier pilot project) received contributions from three levels of government. The B.C. NDP launched the program with an investment that ended up costing $80 million, and will provide another $11.4 million of operating funding this year. The 2019 provincial budget, released last month, included another $76 million for 200 more modular homes, but it’s not clear where in the province those homes will be built.
...
The federal government’s contribution to those first 600 units, announced last month in the days after The Globe and Mail broke the story of the SNC-Lavalin scandal still engulfing the federal Liberals, was $1.5 million. The comparatively small size of the feds’ contribution wasn’t lost on some of those now hoping for more support from Ottawa.
...

Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart, who spent seven years in Ottawa as an NDP MP before his election last year as mayor, seems to want to pressure the federal Liberals during this election year to put their money where their mouths are on housing. Lately, when Stewart gets near a microphone, he keeps bringing up the subject.

Last month, in a one-on-one interview shortly before the B.C. 2019 budget was delivered, Stewart threw the focus to Ottawa, calling the recently announced $1.5-million contribution as “pretty low.”

“The million-and-a-half bucks they gave was for the 600 units we’ve already constructed,” he said. “Now, I would say: ‘Help us bring another 600 (units), we’ll take whatever you can give us in terms of modular.’ ”

At a news conference the following week, Stewart said: “The province has come through in a big way, with the first 600 units, so we hope they’ll continue that trend. At the federal level, there is lots of room for them to help. We have heard lots of good things, and we constantly hear about the (National Housing Strategy’s) $40 billion over 10 years, but not a lot of that money is landing on the ground.”

And the next day, at city council, Stewart stepped it up another notch, saying senior governments were “making lots of noise (about housing,) but really not delivering much money.”

City Coun. Jean Swanson, who introduced a motion late last year calling for another 600 modular homes, was a bit more blunt, as is her way.

In Swanson’s assessment, the federal government’s funding support for housing so far has been “a joke.”

“It would be funny,” Swanson said last month, “if it weren’t so tragic.”

...
 
OP
OP
Caz

Caz

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,437
Canada
The latest from the "What will Doug Ford fuck up next?" Department.



Keep voting Conservative to own the Libs Canada, maybe "this time" austerity and trickle down economics will work!

Some days I hope Ford destroys Ontario and sends it back to the dark ages because it seems people are too stupid to vote properly. I hope the $1 beer for a weekend or two was worth it assholes.
It hasn't even been a year and i'm so very exhausted by all of this.
 

SRG01

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,274
Jesus Christ, I miss a day or two of this thread and it feels like 7 months out from an election we’ve already got Bernie Bro logic in here. Remind me to buckle my seatbelt for this wild ride.
I was literally babysitting my nieces and I come back to this.

I really think everyone just needs to dial down the rhetoric and come back to reasoned discussion and debate.
 

GSG

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,865
The Conservatives are evil BTW, and anyone who votes for them is too.

Don’t give me this “they won’t be so bad” bullshit.
I agree with this

The current incarnation of the CPC is morally bankrupt and infinitely worse for Canada than any other federal party except the PPC, and anyone who leans left and would consider voting for the Conservatives over the Liberals needs to do some serious contemplation of their own life. Voting Conservative is literally the definition of cutting off your nose to spite your face.

I'd take the current Liberals, scandals and broken promises and all, over the Conservatives any day.
 

Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
995
I disagree completely.

The Conservatives under Harper were uninspired, shitty do nothings who only cared about shrinking the size of the government, but least they were shitty within the confines of our system of government. Meanwhile Trudeau sees no issues with casually destroying the independence of the judiciary, which is the first step to becoming a corrupt and undemocratic state. The dangerous actions of Trudeau are wildly more impactful in the long term than Harper's small minded incremental conservatism of narrowly targeted tax credits or his muzzling of scientists.

This issue really shouldn't require voting out the Liberals, but MPs within that party need to get a grip on the reigns here and get Trudeau to back off this terrible path he's on.
 

StevieP

Member
Oct 27, 2017
545
I disagree completely.

The Conservatives under Harper were uninspired, shitty do nothings who only cared about shrinking the size of the government, but least they were shitty within the confines of our system of government. Meanwhile Trudeau sees no issues with casually destroying the independence of the judiciary, which is the first step to becoming a corrupt and undemocratic state. The dangerous actions of Trudeau are wildly more impactful in the long term than Harper's small minded incremental conservatism of narrowly targeted tax credits or his muzzling of scientists.

This issue really shouldn't require voting out the Liberals, but MPs within that party need to get a grip on the reigns here and get Trudeau to back off this terrible path he's on.
I don't think you properly remember harper. I also don't think you're properly contemplating how much further right we've moved.
 

Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
995
I happily invite suggestions of Harper policies and actions that are more negatively impactful than attempting to impose the will of the PMO on the independent legal system.

I feel I've been on this ride before. Before Harper got elected I heard that he'd ban abortion and roll back gay rights. None of it happened. Similarly I'm hearing all of the same sort of scary stories about Scheer and I question how grounded these fears really are. I'm not sure we have moved any further right. A handful of fringe yellow vest protesters doesn't bother me.
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,573
I feel I've been on this ride before. Before Harper got elected I heard that he'd ban abortion and roll back gay rights. None of it happened. Similarly I'm hearing all of the same sort of scary stories about Scheer and I question how grounded these fears really are. I'm not sure we have moved any further right. A handful of fringe yellow vest protesters doesn't bother me.
I live in Ontario and people said Doug Ford won't be that bad. He's literally destroying the province. But hey Wynne did things.

Scheer isn't Harper, remember that the OPC almost elected Maxime Bernier as it's leader. As bad as Harper was, Scheer will be worse, largely because he won't keep the nutjobs under wraps like Harper did. Even Harper sounds nuttier now then when he was in office, but there were very disturbing signs with him in office.

The Overton window has definitely moved. Look around. This is happening worldwide, right wing parties are moving farther right and becoming more extreme.

I honestly can't follow the SNC story to know if anything illegal was done by Trudeau but Ontario as I know it will cease to exist with Scheer and Ford at the Federal and Provincial levels.
 

Terrell

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,880
Canada
I happily invite suggestions of Harper policies and actions that are more negatively impactful than attempting to impose the will of the PMO on the independent legal system.

I feel I've been on this ride before. Before Harper got elected I heard that he'd ban abortion and roll back gay rights. None of it happened. Similarly I'm hearing all of the same sort of scary stories about Scheer and I question how grounded these fears really are. I'm not sure we have moved any further right. A handful of fringe yellow vest protesters doesn't bother me.
Part of why that never happened is Harper got back-to-back minority governments, which meant that any of the big bad things that people were rightfully worried about had to be quelled because it was inevitably going to cost them electoral success. Conservatives are always tame in a minority government context. By the time they won the majority, they did so by stifling the worst that the party has to offer and Harper made the smart decision to stay that course for as long as possible, which honestly led people to a complacent idea of what Canadian conservatism was. The moment their worst traits began to rear their head in the slightest, we punted them, but the damaging perception was already in place. Many people are honestly not aware that what they see as tame kittens are really man-eating bobcats because we'd had them so well-leashed for a decade.

Also, to your other point, I'd say the fact that he consolidated all the power around the PMO and stifled party dissenters was the true first step to where we are now, personally. There was also what they tried to do that led to the prorogation nonsense, where they (as the best-funded party in Canada) tried to slash the $1.95 per vote subsidy that smaller or less well-funded parties depend on to continue to run for Parliament, which never happened because of the coalition threat and the Governor General putting her foot down and saying that Harper and his team needed to draw up a budget bill that would pass a vote in the HoC. (correction: it DID happen when they got their majority, but not in that moment)

If we want to talk about eroding democracy, those were some doozies.
 
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Ac30

Member
Oct 30, 2017
11,152
London
I happily invite suggestions of Harper policies and actions that are more negatively impactful than attempting to impose the will of the PMO on the independent legal system.

I feel I've been on this ride before. Before Harper got elected I heard that he'd ban abortion and roll back gay rights. None of it happened. Similarly I'm hearing all of the same sort of scary stories about Scheer and I question how grounded these fears really are. I'm not sure we have moved any further right. A handful of fringe yellow vest protesters doesn't bother me.
Scheer said he wanted to axe CBC news. As a European, that would certainly concern me.
 

djkimothy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,182
I happily invite suggestions of Harper policies and actions that are more negatively impactful than attempting to impose the will of the PMO on the independent legal system.

I feel I've been on this ride before. Before Harper got elected I heard that he'd ban abortion and roll back gay rights. None of it happened. Similarly I'm hearing all of the same sort of scary stories about Scheer and I question how grounded these fears really are. I'm not sure we have moved any further right. A handful of fringe yellow vest protesters doesn't bother me.
I mean, he cancelled funding for NGOs that provide reproductive services to women, he muzzled scientists for communicating their research, had no climate plan. but yah, Harper was a swell guy.

Like I said, the NDP have more in common with conservatives than liberals. The Obama --> Trump effect is glaringly apparent.
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,592
Toronto
That was just a big damage control conference full of nothing.
It wasn't damage control. It was them doubling down on the same shitty plan that hurts Ausitic kids and ensures any kids on this spectrum in the next 4-5 years, a third of their elementary school career, are utterly fucked.

Its the calm of "Look. We are listening" before the storm of an absolute gutting of our social services.
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,573
It wasn't damage control. It was them doubling down on the same shitty plan that hurts Ausitic kids and ensures any kids on this spectrum in the next 4-5 years, a third of their elementary school career, are utterly fucked.

Its the calm of "Look. We are listening" before the storm of an absolute gutting of our social services.
Yeah students already get $12,300 when they enter the school system and special education budget is already $3B.

They're announcing stuff they already do.

One day online course for autism training for teachers lol.
 
Oct 27, 2017
843
Can we talk about how th Greens are on-track to supplant the NDP as the third party in national polling?


Not a sure thing, but their numbers have consistently been rising, and May is more popular than Singh.
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,573
I'd vote Green in a heartbeat if I didn't think I was pissing my vote away and letting conservatives in.
 

djkimothy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,182
Can we talk about how th Greens are on-track to supplant the NDP as the third party in national polling?


Not a sure thing, but their numbers have consistently been rising, and May is more popular than Singh.
LOL. with the first graph you can actually pinpoint the day when certain news story breaks. It’s interesting how here’s a consistent rise after though. It’s like after the bloodlust people realize Scheer can’t be PM.

EKOS is also seeing similar trends.

 

excelsiorlef

Member
Oct 25, 2017
36,313
Can we talk about how th Greens are on-track to supplant the NDP as the third party in national polling?


Not a sure thing, but their numbers have consistently been rising, and May is more popular than Singh.
The fact that the Cons have a slight lead in vote poll while being terribly behind in terms of who do you want to be PM is as hilarious as it is sad
 

Gabbo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,394
Scheer said he wanted to axe CBC news. As a European, that would certainly concern me.
He doesn't like that they occasionally hold the government to account and ask tough questions. He can't have that. Rebel Media will inform the populace.

re:those polls
Not sure how to feel. I'm glad Scheer has failing support, but not a fan of the statistical tie between the libs and cons.
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,592
Toronto
Can we talk about how th Greens are on-track to supplant the NDP as the third party in national polling?


Not a sure thing, but their numbers have consistently been rising, and May is more popular than Singh.
The Environment is a big deal to a lot of people in the Youth and Millennial demographics. We see the news. We hear the science and we know that we will be left utterly fucked if nothing is done on this front. It's one of the big reasons we writeoff the Conservatives as a valid choice in elections. Not that they pander to us like the Greens and the NDP do every election, as exit polling shows.
 

TheTrinity

Member
Oct 25, 2017
258
Yep, I would at least contemplate voting Green if we had a reasonable election system.
Too bad there was 'no consensus' eh?
 
Oct 27, 2017
843
Of course, even if the Greens got to 15% and the NDP dropped to 11%, the NDP would still likely win far more seats due to their concentration in certain areas, compared to the Greens who are more evenly spread out. However, if the Greens can win the provincial election in PEI on Oct 7, it could boost their numbers for the federal election on the 21st.
 

Lexxism

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,133
Speaking of Green, it seems they might win the PEI election. Will it be the first time a Green party will form a gov’t?
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,592
Toronto
Speaking of Green, it seems they might win the PEI election. Will it be the first time a Green party will form a gov’t?
Yep. It'd be the first Green Government in Canada. That election is also hosting PEI Electoral Reform Part Deux after the Liberal Government there decided they didn't like the result (PR Won) and wanted a do over.
 

Terrell

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,880
Canada
Like I said, the NDP have more in common with conservatives than liberals.
OK, you're going to need to spell this out, because the statement is practically laughable.

Can we talk about how th Greens are on-track to supplant the NDP as the third party in national polling?


Not a sure thing, but their numbers have consistently been rising, and May is more popular than Singh.
The Green vote nationwide is highly consolidated in BC and certain corners of the Maritimes, which may skew the poll depending on the sample unless the data is broken down by province. We already knew the Greens were gaining massive strength in the Maritimes compared to last election, mostly on the back of the intensely well-liked Peter Bevin-Baker and his colleagues in other provinces.

Speaking of Green, it seems they might win the PEI election. Will it be the first time a Green party will form a gov’t?
There's no "might" about it, PEI seems ready to toss the Liberals and choosing the Greens to do it. They're a bit of an aberration, though, as it comes about from having a really well-liked leader, an absolute cratering of the PEI PC Party (which they won't be able to recover from in time of the likely summer election there) and the sustained weakness of the PEINDP; the Greens are basically the only choice for voters who want to throw the Liberals out of power there.

There has been a knock-on effect in surrounding provinces, though, with Greens making larger in-roads in the Maritimes outside of PEI, but nothing to the level or strength seen within PEI.
 
Oct 25, 2017
316
Ottawa, Canada
lmao the Feds have contributed just $1.5M to the City of Vancouver's big anti-poverty housing effort holy shit. Great job spending those infrastructure dollars we went into deficit for you guys.
I know that facts are inconvenient things for you, but that doesn't mean you get to make up your own. The federal government contributed $1.5 million to one specific modular housing project in the City of Vancouver. While I suppose you could argue that modular housing is the only way to go -- and hey, the federal NDP apparently believes that repairing housing doesn't count, so maybe that is your argument -- the fact is, there are many, many other types of housing. You could, for example, count this rental construction project for which the feds are providing $40 million. You could count any of the housing investments the PM announced last month, ranging from $1.5 million for more modular housing to $11.3 million for temporary housing for women recovering from addition. Or you could look at the housing money that's been spent in Vancouver since 2015, which by my math amounts to around $60 million once you factor in housing subsidies (which you should, because starting next year, the feds will be giving people living in housing need the Canada Housing Benefit, and BC was one of the first provinces to sign on to the benefit, as part of the $1 billion housing agreement they signed with the federal government last summer).

I mean, I know that you don't want to acknowledge these things because they run counter to the narrative you guys are trying to construct, but as was the case with poverty -- hey, remember when you said that the Liberals have done nothing to help people living in poverty? About that... -- what you're saying is either uninformed or intentionally misleading.
 

SRG01

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,274
My vote literally does not matter in my riding, so I'll continue to vote Green.

Too bad the per vote subsidy was scrapped...
 

Prax

Member
Oct 25, 2017
730
My vote literally does not matter in my riding, so I'll continue to vote Green.

Too bad the per vote subsidy was scrapped...
Parties should campaign on bringing that back. Even the Libs. That would increase voter participation at least a little sicne people would feel like they are making a dollar difference or whatever for their party. This was pretty much done to cripple the left by the Cons.
 

Terrell

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,880
Canada
My vote literally does not matter in my riding, so I'll continue to vote Green.

Too bad the per vote subsidy was scrapped...
I somehow completely forgot that Harper did finally ram that through with his majority.
Parties should campaign on bringing that back. Even the Libs. That would increase voter participation at least a little sicne people would feel like they are making a dollar difference or whatever for their party. This was pretty much done to cripple the left by the Cons.
I think the Tories underestimated Liberal fundraising strength when they made that decision, given how weak they were at the time. So all the Tories did (unless electoral reform actually finally happens) is lead us to an inevitable 2-party system. And I hate to inform them that such a future wouldn't favour them in the slightest. But that's what happens when you make petty short-sighted power plays, more often than not.
 

filkry

Member
Oct 25, 2017
679
If the greens were pro-nuclear and pro-GMO they would be my party of choice. I wish they didn't cater so much to the fearful anti-science crowd.

*edit* I should mention that I haven't looked at a Green platform since the 2015 federal election.
 

Terrell

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,880
Canada
If the greens were pro-nuclear and pro-GMO they would be my party of choice. I wish they didn't cater so much to the fearful anti-science crowd.

*edit* I should mention that I haven't looked at a Green platform since the 2015 federal election.
You are correct in that they have a troubling history on that, but there's caveats there and I wouldn't put them entirely in "anti-GMO" territory. I'm pro-GMO, but I do worry about jumping the gun on implementation.

I can agree with wanting studies on long-term environmental and public health impacts before crops are put in the ground and not permitting patents on GMO crops, and I'm indifferent on food packaging requirements. But ending further development of GMOs and not having much to say about doing similar studies with farms engaged in selective breeding (which is equally damaging to unstudied GMOs, in my eye, being that selective breeding is to GMOs what the long division method is to using a calculator) are policy positions that they really need to address in order to be taken seriously on the subject.
 

Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
995
I know that facts are inconvenient things for you, but that doesn't mean you get to make up your own. The federal government contributed $1.5 million to one specific modular housing project in the City of Vancouver. While I suppose you could argue that modular housing is the only way to go -- and hey, the federal NDP apparently believes that repairing housing doesn't count, so maybe that is your argument -- the fact is, there are many, many other types of housing. You could, for example, count this rental construction project for which the feds are providing $40 million. You could count any of the housing investments the PM announced last month, ranging from $1.5 million for more modular housing to $11.3 million for temporary housing for women recovering from addition....

I mean, I know that you don't want to acknowledge these things because they run counter to the narrative you guys are trying to construct, but as was the case with poverty -- hey, remember when you said that the Liberals have done nothing to help people living in poverty? About that... -- what you're saying is either uninformed or intentionally misleading.
I'm posting articles as I see them pop across my desk. I had no idea about this $40M toward some rental building. It's not just me that's critical here, but the Mayor of Vancouver that is being quoted in the article. That's what stood out the most to me and why I even bothered to post it.

Lol maybe the Feds need to resurrect those "Canada Economic Action Plan" signs Harper put up everywhere because while it's easy to see the Temporary Modular Housing (TMH) that have quickly popped up all over Vancouver, any other actions by other parties haven't been so obvious at all. That's made me wonder if all the infrastructure money has gone to build gazebos in PEI or some shit instead.

There's 2000+ homeless in Vancouver so that's why throwing up TMHs, which can be ready to go in a month or so, has been the first act that the province has been focusing on. Maybe the Feds can show some hustle and step in with more money to build the next step of permanent housing.
 
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Oct 27, 2017
843
I live in Ralph Goodale's riding so even if I don't want Trudeau as PM I will still vote for Ralph (who should be PM). I lived in Erin Weir's riding last election, and actually walked door-to-door with him. He's definitely a weird guy who is likely on the Autism spectrum, but damn does he know his policy. Unfortunately he will not win back his riding thanks to no longer being allowed to run by Singh (even though everyone in the province wants him to run for the party), so the Conservatives will win the seat back.
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,573
It wasn't damage control. It was them doubling down on the same shitty plan that hurts Ausitic kids and ensures any kids on this spectrum in the next 4-5 years, a third of their elementary school career, are utterly fucked.

Its the calm of "Look. We are listening" before the storm of an absolute gutting of our social services.
So this "announcement" was something the Liberals already did.

They're literally announcing things the previous government did and taking credit for it.

 

console lover

Member
Feb 19, 2018
5,429
The latest from the "What will Doug Ford fuck up next?" Department.



Keep voting Conservative to own the Libs Canada, maybe "this time" austerity and trickle down economics will work!

Some days I hope Ford destroys Ontario and sends it back to the dark ages because it seems people are too stupid to vote properly. I hope the $1 beer for a weekend or two was worth it assholes.
Is it important for primary teachers to have University education!? Stick Ford in a classroom and he'd get eaten alive by the kids
 

console lover

Member
Feb 19, 2018
5,429
Canada has always been more naturally left leaning than our american neighbours. I remember a canadian history prof in Uni even mentioning that the Harper conversatives would be considered more liberal than Obama democrats in the states. I think the recent poles kind of bare that out. It's kind of a reversed fucked up thing of like how in the states Republicans get LOTS of leeway. Now the liberals don't get that much leeway.....but if the demoncrats had the kind of trackrecords that liberal party in Canada has. Whoah boy
 

GSG

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,865
Canada has always been more naturally left leaning than our american neighbours. I remember a canadian history prof in Uni even mentioning that the Harper conversatives would be considered more liberal than Obama democrats in the states. I think the recent poles kind of bare that out. It's kind of a reversed fucked up thing of like how in the states Republicans get LOTS of leeway. Now the liberals don't get that much leeway.....but if the demoncrats had the kind of trackrecords that liberal party in Canada has. Whoah boy
I don't think I'd agree with that.

The CPC is more left in some aspects, but that's because that's how Canadian society is in general compared to America. There are loads of socially conservative and regressive elements in the CPC. Stephen Harper's foreign policy alone would make the most right leaning GOP neocon blush.
 

Terrell

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,880
Canada
I live in Ralph Goodale's riding so even if I don't want Trudeau as PM I will still vote for Ralph (who should be PM). I lived in Erin Weir's riding last election, and actually walked door-to-door with him. He's definitely a weird guy who is likely on the Autism spectrum, but damn does he know his policy. Unfortunately he will not win back his riding thanks to no longer being allowed to run by Singh (even though everyone in the province wants him to run for the party), so the Conservatives will win the seat back.
Regina-Lewvan was VERY competitive last go-round and the NDP didn't win on the charisma or policy knowledge of Erin Weir. Just saying.
I consider the riding a toss-up with or without him.

Canada has always been more naturally left leaning than our american neighbours. I remember a canadian history prof in Uni even mentioning that the Harper conversatives would be considered more liberal than Obama democrats in the states. I think the recent poles kind of bare that out.
Speaking of how public perception was horribly skewed by Conservatives in a hamstrung minority setting... no better example than this.
 

Gabbo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,394
Is it important for primary teachers to have University education!? Stick Ford in a classroom and he'd get eaten alive by the kids
Stick Ford in a class room and he'd be the stupidist person in the room.

If they can try to justify lowering requirements they'll try to use that to justify lower salary baselines, especially for new teachers coming out of teachers college.

Clearly he's gearing for or oblivious to the fight he's about to get into with OSSTF and ETFO. I was in grade 6 during the Harris strikes, so i dont remember how long the longest one lasted. Odds we sail past that if it gets that far?
Hell public perception of teachers in 2019 is not what it was 20 years ago, he's going to make parents angry if he handles it as well as he did autism funding.
 

console lover

Member
Feb 19, 2018
5,429
Stick Ford in a class room and he'd be the stupidist person in the room.

If they can try to justify lowering requirements they'll try to use that to justify lower salary baselines, especially for new teachers coming out of teachers college.

Clearly he's gearing for or oblivious to the fight he's about to get into with OSSTF and ETFO. I was in grade 6 during the Harris strikes, so i dont remember how long the longest one lasted. Odds we sail past that if it gets that far?
Hell public perception of teachers in 2019 is not what it was 20 years ago, he's going to make parents angry if he handles it as well as he did autism funding.
If you look at the Ontario educator salary grid their is already a level for non university degree. It goes A, A1 all the way to 4. So...it doesn't really have an effect, the grid is the grid. It just pushes up the teachers who are A1 into a higher standing in their respective school board. But again, the school boards do the hiring. If person A has a university degree and person B has a college diploma.....I don't think he thought this through.

I assume the non university "track" is for those teachers who have been around so long they've been basically grandfathered in with old credentials. If he wanted to shove down teacher salaries he'd do the opposite and increase the qualifications. But thankfully he's stupid