Canada PoliERA |OT| Two Years of Sunny Days? That’s Scheer Madness!

gutter_trash

Member
Oct 26, 2017
12,120
Montreal
Let's not pretend the liberals did anything more for climate change than what the CAQ will be doing. Quebec can cut emissions in the transport sector, that's it. Our energy needs are already 98% filled by clean energy. We also are developping technologies to recycle batteries. Legault ideas to sell green electricity to states down south is a good one.
It's not HIS idea, Quebec has been selling Hydro to Americans for many years, including PLQ and PQ governments
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,400
Rocco Rossi of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce said the same thing and Vic Fedeli waved off his concerns and told the OCC to get on board. lol
Owning yourself to own the libs is my favourite meta.
WTF do they get out of this? I mean is the lobbying from the corner store association or whatever they are called that lucrative?

Even the dumbest politicians bow down to political bodies much bigger than they are who tell them something is a very bad idea with bad consequences.

He's polling worse than Wynne and the OPC is still pushing on with bad expensive ideas.
 

Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
966
Green Party thoughts...

What's with the surge towards the Greens anyway?
The economy is doing better so now people can care about other things.
Yeah a strongly possible component of the rise in support. The economy in BC during the last election was phenomenal, and yet Liberal supporters drifted off to the Greens anyway. Why? When times are good and the basics are covered people ask for more. People become more comfortable with change.

Adding onto this I'd suggest:

* With ever more obvious signs of climate related disasters, the climate issue can no longer be treated with slow and steady solutions.
* General dissatisfaction with the status quo Conservative/Liberal two party dynamic as being capable of bringing change. We've seen this most strongly reflected in the Atlantic Provinces where parties are being kicked out after just one term and voters are thrashing back and forth between the two. There's clearly a feeling that some third alternative is required. For whatever reason in Atlantic Canada the NDP has not benefited from this, but rather the Greens. It'll be interesting to see whether this is simply an Atlantic Canada thing or the same trend manifests elsewhere.


Green's are more centre than the NDP. Heck the NDP has a better climate change plan right now but the cost plus cutting fossil fuel subsidies means they'll never win.

They're kind of the centre left party now that isn't Trudeau which is their appeal.
You’ll have to forgive me, what exactly makes the Greens centre-left precisely, especially compared to the NDP? There are some differing opinions on this subject.
The present Green Party under May is closer to the former Progressive Conservative Party than to the NDP. Elizabeth May is a former political staffer with the Mulroney Government.
I posted this earlier but the most common read of BC election results is that Fed Liberals dissatisfied with the BC Liberals found a home with the Greens. In BC the Greens have positioned themselves where the Federal Liberals do, as a socially progressive, technocratic, free market party. The Fed Greens don't seem that much different. The core difference is they're aggressive on environmental issues, but that's an axis independent of the traditional left/right political axis. There's no reason why a socially conservative or economically conservative party couldn't also be environmentalist. The centre right BC Liberals for example implemented the most economically conservative approach to climate action with their revenue neutral carbon tax.

The core difference I see between the NDP and Greens (especially now that the NDP seems to be matching and exceeding the Greens on environmental policy) is around labour issues. In BC the minority NDP government has not moved as far as promised on labour policy reform due to a lack of support from their Green minority partners.

I'd suspect that there's also likely a spot of differentiation where the NDP are more likely to support universal programs while the Greens (like the Liberals) would tend more toward means tested programs. Ultimately I think we'll have to wait until more policy documents appear to really sort out where every party is going to land this election.

The energy corridor is an idea to appease Québec. It's basically : "we'll let you sell electricity to the West if you let us put pipelines on your territory". Legault is big on electricity because it's an easy way to pretend he does something to fight climate changes and at the same time it plays well with its nationalist base, Hydro-Québec being a "fleuron" and all. If he can sell electricity west, he might even get to build a new gigantic dam, something he's very keen to.
Quebec is already quite happy to be selling their power to the Americans so there's really no reason for them to play ball on some sort of "grand bargain" energy corridor idea. It's dead in the water already.

The only grid expansion that makes sense would be for Alberta to buy power from BC and for adjacent provinces to buy more power from Manitoba.
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,523
Toronto
I'd suspect that there's also likely a spot of differentiation where the NDP are more likely to support universal programs while the Greens (like the Liberals) would tend more toward means tested programs. Ultimately I think we'll have to wait until more policy documents appear to really sort out where every party is going to land this election.
Even then, the Green Party beat everybody to the punch by supporting a Basic Income scheme in the form of a Negative Income Tax (Which is by far the most realistic schema of BI, but I digress), Universal Dentalcare and Pharmacare. So it's not like the Greens aren't big on the social program front either.
 

Zyzomys

Member
Dec 5, 2017
223
Ottawa Canada
The energy corridor is an idea to appease Québec. It's basically : "we'll let you sell electricity to the West if you let us put pipelines on your territory". Legault is big on electricity because it's an easy way to pretend he does something to fight climate changes and at the same time it plays well with its nationalist base, Hydro-Québec being a "fleuron" and all. If he can sell electricity west, he might even get to build a new gigantic dam, something he's very keen to.
Scheer once again lacks actual industry knowledge. In order for more hydroelectric dams to be built, Quebec needs to negotiate with Quebec's Innu and Cree First Nations. While I am sure this can happen, this is an internal Quebec issue. And the laws of physics restrains Quebec-Hydro from shipping electricity much further than is currently possible without over coming much larger transmission loss - plus Quebec-Hydro already reaches and has long term contracts with the largest possible market immediately to the south of Quebec.
 

djkimothy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,039
Scheer once again lacks actual industry knowledge. In order for more hydroelectric dams to be built, Quebec needs to negotiate with Quebec's Innu and Cree First Nations. While I am sure this can happen, this is an internal Quebec issue. And the laws of physics restrains Quebec-Hydro from shipping electricity much further than is currently possible without over coming much larger transmission loss - plus Quebec-Hydro already reaches and has long term contracts with the largest possible market immediately to the south of Quebec.
LOL, the CPC caring about first nation concerns... Even IF Quebec is the one that has to pull those levers, the CPC will figuratively and literally bulldoze through those concerns.
 

mo60

Member
Oct 25, 2017
629
Edmonton, Alberta
The only province in Atlantic Canada the greens federally and provincially are still pretty irrelevant in is Newfoundland. The provincial NDP has been benefiting a bit in newfoundland from the lack of a strong green party.
 

Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
966
Nice little history lesson about Canada's "Greatest Canadian," Tommy Douglas.

Tommy Douglas, Canada’s Great Prairie Socialist, Wasn’t Always So Beloved
The late Tommy Douglas, Canada’s venerable socialist leader and the father of its single-payer health care system, is now revered as the “greatest Canadian.” But in his time, he was a radical and an enemy of the establishment.

Tommy Douglas is generally remembered as the father of Canada’s Medicare, the first universal health care system in North America. Since his death in 1986, the former premier of Saskatchewan and first leader of the social-democratic New Democratic Party (NDP) has ascended to the status of national icon — even being voted “the greatest Canadian” in a widely watched 2004 poll conducted by Canada’s public broadcast network.

But Douglas’s consecrated status has come at a cost, with his avowedly socialist politics either stripped away or cast aside altogether. It is a testament to his legacy that one reason for this is the continued popularity of Canada’s health care system: now such an integral part of the country’s political consensus that even most conservatives have abandoned dreams of its outright abolition. Nevertheless, few these days remember Douglas for who he really was: a populist radical who spent his life as an outspoken critic and adversary of capitalism. So depoliticized has Douglas become that a cabinet minister in Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s hard-right government recently evoked him in a farcical effort to justify austerity.

His legacy deserves better, not only for its own sake but because of what it teaches us about the nature of political and social progress.

Born in Falkirk, Scotland in 1904, Douglas moved with his family to Winnipeg in 1910. (In 1919, he would be there to witness the famous general strike firsthand.) While studying theology in the early 1920s he met Stanley Knowles, a convert to Canada’s Christian social gospel movement, and became increasingly immersed in its radically egalitarian values.

After becoming a minister, he was elected to the House of Commons in 1935 as part of a tiny contingent of MPs from the newly formed Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), which only two years earlier had adopted the transformational Regina Manifesto — a program for social justice and economic planning that concluded with the radical sentiment: “No C.C.F. Government will rest content until it has eradicated capitalism and put into operation the full program of socialized planning which will lead to the establishment in Canada of the Cooperative Commonwealth.”

Douglas led the CCF to victory, winning a landslide (forty-seven of fifty-three seats) in Saskatchewan’s 1944 provincial election — securing democratic socialism’s first major electoral beachhead in North America. Serving as premier until his departure in 1961 to lead the newly created NDP, Douglas oversaw a sweeping legislative program that included (among other things) the nationalization of key utilities and services, including electricity; the creation of Canada’s first public auto insurance system; and the passage of a significant Bill of Rights guaranteeing freedom of assembly and prohibiting various forms of discrimination.

Douglas’s health care reforms, though often remembered ahistorically, were met with fierce opposition from business interests and many in the medical profession.

...

...Even as Douglas stepped up to lead the NDP, powerful interests conspired to prevent Medicare from becoming a reality in his home province. With support from both the Canadian and American Medical Associations, Saskatchewan’s doctors struck for twenty-three days in an effort to block its passage, resorting to a campaign of red-baiting and fear-mongering. Douglas was burnt in effigy while the CCF was depicted as Nazi, Stalinist, or both.

...

Throughout his political career, Douglas fought a perpetual and often uphill battle against the prevailing orthodoxies of Canadian capitalism and the powerful interests that maintained them. Grandfathered into respectability after his death, he was reviled by the establishment in life and was even subject to a spy campaign by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) — who maintained a file on him some 1,100 pages thick.

...
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,400

Doug Ford has shown a willingness to rip up contracts with business. But why is the premier wasting time on small-fry deals like the province’s contract with the Beer Store, when he could be bold and discard the mother of all Ontario’s bad deals with business — the privatization of Highway 407.
We're just descending into stupidity now.

Not that I wouldn't mind this deal going away but why enable them?

Besides, Ford would just sell it to one of his friends.
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,523
Toronto
I wonder if Ford was told to stop poisoning the CPC's chances this fall...

Jesus Fucking Christ. So they are basically taking a 5 month vacation on the taxpayer dime. Not that i'm entirely complaining because it means 5 months of them not fucking this province over at the speed of light. But christ, these people can't even be arsed to even pretend to do their fucking jobs.

Man, Doug must be really terrified of the Pride Parade if he feels the need to run away for a 5 month period of time.

Also Sheer must have really whipped the everloving fear into Ontario Progressive Conservative party to get them to stop virtually all activity for a couple months.

Another thought. This is going to fail so hard on them. They can say they are going on break for 5 months all they want, but they are heading at light-speed directly into the brick-wall that is the Ontario Teachers Union going on strike this summer, and knowing them, I guarantee they will come back just to issue a back to work order, backed up with trampling over the strikers Constitutional Rights as they invoke Article 33.
 
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flameINSANE

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12
Another thought. This is going to fail so hard on them. They can say they are going on break for 5 months all they want, but they are heading at light-speed directly into the brick-wall that is the Ontario Teachers Union going on strike this summer, and knowing them, I guarantee they will come back just to issue a back to work order, backed up with trampling over the strikers Constitutional Rights as they invoke Article 33.
On the other hand, they seem hell-bent on destroying everything else in Ontario so what's two months of empty schools? 🙃
 

flameINSANE

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12
In Hellberta news, the UCP has wasted no time in killing GSAs. Principals are effectively no longer held to meeting requests for establishing GSAs. This quote in particular kills me:
NDP Leader Rachel Notley accused LaGrange of bowing to socially conservative interests in her party.

"You know as many as half of boards will abandon GSAs and you're OK with it, because your values are more important than the safety of those kids," Notley said during question period. "Why not just admit it."

LaGrange said she disagreed with Notley's characterization, saying Alberta privacy legislation would protect students.

"What I heard from students that are in these organizations is that they want balance," LaGrange told the house.
 

gutter_trash

Member
Oct 26, 2017
12,120
Montreal

Quebec minister of tourism and concert with is clamping down on AirBnB and other short term rentals.

IMO, it's about god damn time. They emphasize on clear and simple rules to avoid loopholes.


New registration process
Quebecers who rent out their homes on a short-term basis (less than 31 days) will be required to obtain a registration number through the province. The registration number will be available "easily and at a reasonable cost" of between $50 and $75, according to the province.

That number will need to be included on any advertising, contract or website connected to the rental unit.

Condo owners require approval
Condo owners will require the approval of their syndicate or condo association before renting out their home on a short-term basis. Likewise, those who are renters themselves will require the approval of their landlord.

Applies to 'primary residences'
The rules will apply to what's defined as a "primary residence," where the host normally lives. There is a different set of rules for "secondary residences," including cottages and furnished apartments. In those cases, the renter must register a more detailed form with the Corporation de l'industrie touristique du Québec, which oversees the province's tourism industry.

Fuck AirBnB
As an owner of a condo unit, I am super happy and extatic with the news.
My condo association is pretty strict, these changes would give condo associations more teeth to refuse a condo unit owner who wants to convert to a AirBnB type unit
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,523
Toronto

Quebec minister of tourism and concert with is clamping down on AirBnB and other short term rentals.

IMO, it's about god damn time. They emphasize on clear and simple rules to avoid loopholes.



As an owner of a condo unit, I am super happy and extatic with the news.
My condo association is pretty strict, these changes would give condo associations more teeth to refuse a condo unit owner who wants to convert to a AirBnB type unit
Thank God! It's about time somebody started clamping down on AirBNB
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,400
The only way it could be better is if they took the revenue from the extra registrations and put it towards building out more affordable housing
Is it just me or is "affordable housing" a joke? They never build anywhere near enough and it just causes a big lottery where thousands apply for just a hundred places etc.

Need mind how NIMBYism is against building these units in a lot of neighbourhoods, because people who need affordable housing are either immigrants or drug users, criminals etc. in their eyes. Plus they don't want their property values lowered.

Seems like you just need to build more housing, preferably away from the big cities and have some effective mass transit.

Or if more companies let you telecommute so you can live in a cheaper location rather than the overpriced GTA for example.
 

gutter_trash

Member
Oct 26, 2017
12,120
Montreal
Canada should also limit foreign buyers,

the Condo building next to the Bell Centre (Tour des Candiens) related to the Habs is a joke where the majority of owners are non-citizens and the whole building has been turned into AirBnB hell. Legit residents who bought expensive units to reside in are living a hellish nightmare with AirBnB customers partying all the time wrecking the place.
 

djkimothy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,039
I’m just hoping this leads to real movement.

No matter how much the liberals screw up the opposition finds a way to out do him.


Ottawa being largely employed by the federal government i’m beginning to think even the suburbs are out of reach for scheer here. No one wants two layers of austerity.
 

killerrin

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,523
Toronto
Is it just me or is "affordable housing" a joke? They never build anywhere near enough and it just causes a big lottery where thousands apply for just a hundred places etc.

Need mind how NIMBYism is against building these units in a lot of neighbourhoods, because people who need affordable housing are either immigrants or drug users, criminals etc. in their eyes. Plus they don't want their property values lowered.

Seems like you just need to build more housing, preferably away from the big cities and have some effective mass transit.

Or if more companies let you telecommute so you can live in a cheaper location rather than the overpriced GTA for example.
Oh no, it is. The problem with affordable housing is that there isn't enough of it. The reason there isn't enough of it, there is no money to do a proper build out and Municipalities are left negotiating with developers to allow their applications to go through for either discounts on property taxes, or allowing them to build higher than their building codes allow. There are a ton of people who need affordable housing. And many multiples of that who need the next level up of entry-level housing.

Also another problem is that "Affordable housing" is on a sliding scale meaning everything from getting homeless off the streets to ensuring single people can afford a 1 bedroom apartment and families can afford a place for their 3 kids. And for all of those classifications, there isn't enough of any of them being built.

Which is why they should totally take the money they are going to be collecting from this and putting it directly into building up new housing units.
 

SRG01

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,197
Canada should also limit foreign buyers,

the Condo building next to the Bell Centre (Tour des Candiens) related to the Habs is a joke where the majority of owners are non-citizens and the whole building has been turned into AirBnB hell. Legit residents who bought expensive units to reside in are living a hellish nightmare with AirBnB customers partying all the time wrecking the place.
Yup, the biggest problem with AirBNB is the grey legality of it whereby people can buy up entire condo suites and turn them into "hostels".
 

Mr.Mike

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,442
I think the Conservative social media machine has been pushing a pro Philpot/JWR line in their attacka on Trudeau, so maybe that's causing some Conservative support to go to them.
 

Mr.Mike

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,442
Labour Force Survey, May 2019

Employment held steady in May, following a strong increase in April. The unemployment rate was down 0.3 percentage points to 5.4%, as the number of people looking for work decreased sharply following little change over the previous three months. The unemployment rate in May was the lowest since comparable data became available in 1976.

...

Summer employment for students

From May to August, the Labour Force Survey collects labour market data on youths aged 15 to 24 who were attending school full time in March and who intend to return to school full time in the fall. The May survey results provide the first indicators of the summer job market, especially for students aged 20 to 24, as many younger students are still in school. Data for June, July and August will provide further insight into the summer job market. As published data are not seasonally adjusted, comparisons can only be made with data for the same month in previous years.

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment among 20- to 24-year-old students grew by 32,000 (+7.4%) in May, as a result of an increase in part-time work. The unemployment rate for this group was down 2.8 percentage points to 10.8%. At the same time, the employment rate for this same group rose by 6.0 percentage points to 63.0%, the highest rate for the month of May since 2008.

In May 2019, there were 35,000 (+8.5%) more 17- to 19-year-old students employed compared with May 2018, driven by an increase in part-time employment. The employment rate was little changed at 50.7%, as the population of students in this age group grew at a similar pace to employment. The unemployment rate for this younger group of students was also little changed at 13.4%.
 

Pedrito

Member
Nov 4, 2017
999
Mad Max is one step removed from tweeting QAnon shit.
For now, he's just retweeting videos from QAnon crackpots
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,400
Mad Max is one step removed from tweeting QAnon shit.
For now, he's just retweeting videos from QAnon crackpots
Oh Lord I'm embarrassed to say I recognize that crackpot.
She interjected herself into the Ontario autism activism discussion on Twitter with her loony conspiracy theories.
She's really far gone

Speaking of Mad Max and the OPC:


Someone faked emails to try and discredit them(not that they don't do a good job on their own).
Interesting someone would go to such lengths.

It's going to be a really fucked up election.
 
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Tiktaalik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
966
Trudeau's Senate appointees save B.C. oil tanker ban bill from defeat

While the Senate's transport committee recommended the upper house defeat the bill outright, a coalition of Independent and Liberal senators has cobbled together enough votes to rescue legislation to implement the government's planned ban on oil tankers along B.C.'s northern coast.

The outcome was far from certain after the committee that studied the legislation recommended against passing the Liberal plan. The committee issued a scathing report this week saying that, if passed, the bill would stoke a nascent separatist movement in Western Canada, and accused the government of unfairly targeting Alberta's oilpatch at a time of constrained pipeline capacity and cratering oil prices.

The strongly worded report — penned by the committee's chair, Conservative Saskatchewan Sen. David Tkachuk — prompted a backlash of sorts Wednesday night from other senators who called it overly partisan.

Senators rejected the committee's report by a vote of 38 to 53, with one abstention. Now, senators are expected to make amendments at the third reading phase of the legislative process before sending the bill back to the Commons for approval.

...
Good.
 

mintzilla

Member
Nov 6, 2017
520
Canada
Maxime needs to chill out as i cant see his party helping split the right wing vote at all the way he is going. what a useless guy.
 
Maxime needs to chill out as i cant see his party helping split the right wing vote at all the way he is going. what a useless guy.
Eh, dunno, if the People's Party is going to actually lure voters it probably has to be offering up the hardcore conspiracy crack, as opposed to generic conservative platitudes. You need passion to split the vote, and if the past few years have conclusively proven anything it's that there's no real passionate base for conservative economic theory, etc.; only culture clash issues mobilize.
 

Fuzzy

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
5,930
Toronto, Canada