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Sep 14, 2018
29
Most people just straight out put the cat in the same space as the others (so right out of the bat, you're doing it better). Our cats are exceedingly tame and are used to cats coming and going, so we've not had this behaviour, but it seems very normal to me. Cats identify each other by scent; until they get used to the new cat's scent, they're going to think "there's an intruder in the colony"; and if each other is the only cat they can see, it does make some sense they believe the scent belongs to the other. It's really weird for us humans to think of seeing someone and not quite recognizing them, but again, cats identify by scent, not sight.

My guess is that it should be perfectly OK. In a week or two they should have grown accustomed to the smell, at which point they should have stopped growling at each other (probable much sooner) and you can let Rayla out of the room.
Awesome! Thanks for the info, that's a huge relief.
It's my first time adapting a new cat, so it's been a wild ride!
 
OP
OP
Weltall Zero
Oct 26, 2017
8,855
Madrid
Awesome! Thanks for the info, that's a huge relief.
It's my first time adapting a new cat, so it's been a wild ride!
Just consulted with my quite expert SO just in case, she thinks the same, it's perfectly normal.

I had missed that your other two cats are also female. Female cats tend to be considerably more territorial, especially with each other, so that probably accounts for why they're kind of upset at each other too. Again, I don't think you should have a problem and it should solve itself in a week or two, but keep us posted and don't hesitate to ask anything else. :)
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,074
Can CatEra pour one out for my boy Loki. My friend for 15 years who passed this morning.

Been scrolling through this thread looking at all the lovely cats and info within and remembering all the good times I had with him.
He had a good life and was loved by our entire family. Sad he's gone, but proud we gave him a great life. Give your cats an extra cuddle from us tonight. x

Oh no :( What a grand looking fellow he is too, looks like he knew what he loved and very sure of himself. Thanks for giving him his best life :)

Unfortunately Spain has gotten a very bad rep for animal abuse. There are some horrific stories out there. There are plenty of stories about greyhounds being used for hunting (they call them galgos) and then abandoning them or hanging them when no longer useful. Estimated 100K greyhounds per year killed. Fortunately there are more and more rescue operations stepping up to try and save as many as possible, but proper pet shelters in Spain are definitely needed.
Considering the amount of cats then end up going through pet shelters, a lack of this service would be horrible for many kitties as well.
Seriously, fuck the people who use greyhounds as disposable hunting dogs. Ugh.

Greyhounds were unfortunately "trendy" among low-education, nearly-delinquent youths ("canis", our equivalent of "chavs"; no relation to the latin for "dog" which might be confusing considering the context, it's just an abbreviation of "canijo", or "puny") a few years ago, for whatever stupid reason. Unsurprisingly most of them ended up abused or abandoned when they inevitably got tired of them.
Whereabouts are you from? The only times I've ever known greys to be essentially abandoned en-masse was the Spain situation above. Even sadder that it's happening elsewhere too :(


On a slightly lighter note, my wife and I have discovered that our cats do not apparently have an increased appetite, but our greyhound has been sneakily grazing on their food at night while we weren't looking! Even setting up chair barriers so only the cats can get to the food doesn't help, he just barges through. If anyone has any ideas on how to protect cat food from dogs (and it doesn't look hideous) I'd love to hear about it.
Such a shit, that dog. Then he does his hangdog expression and he gets away with it. Argh.

PS. For what it's worth, if people in this thread can't have/don't like cats, greyhounds are a more than suitable substitute. They may already even go with your current kitties! Adopt one (or two) today :)
 
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Nov 6, 2017
2,343
I had a dog and cat at the same time, and no amount of training was going to stop him from eating the cat's food. A separate room was the only way to keep the dog away from the cat's food. I ended up tying the bathroom door so that it only allowed enough space for the cat to enter but not the dog. Cat got fed in the bathroom. Getting a cat door would have worked too.

This obviously wouldn't work if the dog is a similar size as the cat. Other than that, I really don't know of any gadgets or tricks to keep the dog away.
 
OP
OP
Weltall Zero
Oct 26, 2017
8,855
Madrid
Whereabouts are you from? The only times I've ever known greys to be essentially abandoned en-masse was the Spain situation above. Even sadder that it's happening elsewhere too :(
I'm from Spain myself, Madrid specifically. As mentioned in the OP, my SO's cat rescue / adoption service is called Mininos de Madrid. As you can imagine, she's never idle; we joke that she's like Astro City's Samaritan, in that she can't ever rest. :/

On a slightly lighter note, my wife and I have discovered that our cats do not apparently have an increased appetite, but our greyhound has been sneakily grazing on their food at night while we weren't looking! Even setting up chair barriers so only the cats can get to the food doesn't help, he just barges through. If anyone has any ideas on how to protect cat food from dogs (and it doesn't look hideous) I'd love to hear about it.
Such a shit, that dog. Then he does his hangdog expression and he gets away with it. Argh.
That's quite the conundrum! Greyhounds are so slender they can probably sneak in anywhere. I wonder if there's some kind of substance that dogs dislike but cat's don't mind that you could sprinkle around the food. I know of the things cats themselves don't like (citrus, pepper, etc.) but I don't know of the equivalent for dogs.

PS. For what it's worth, if people in this thread can't have/don't like cats, greyhounds are a more than suitable substitute. They may already even go with your current kitties! Adopt one (or two) today :)
I'm allergic to dogs, so that's a no-go for me, but I just thought of my best friend who's the opposite (allergic to cats, but not dogs). How do they handle smooth parquet floors?
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,074
I'm allergic to dogs, so that's a no-go for me, but I just thought of my best friend who's the opposite (allergic to cats, but not dogs). How do they handle smooth parquet floors?
Are you allergic to greyhounds? I've read that they're low allergen because of their short fur, you might be lucky!

As for smooth floors, it can be a struggle for him sometimes. He's a bigger boy so it might just be due to his size, but it's not overly easy for him to stand up. But once he's up and trotting around, he's fine :)

To make this relevant:
 

weemadarthur

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,734
I'm allergic to dogs, so that's a no-go for me, but I just thought of my best friend who's the opposite (allergic to cats, but not dogs). How do they handle smooth parquet floors?
Greyhounds can’t handle them. They need grippy rugs. They treat the world like The Floor Is Lava if you don’t give them pathways. Also they kick non grippy rugs around. The aversion can make them avoid whole rooms, if they are the nervous type.
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,074
Greyhounds can’t handle them. They need grippy rugs. They treat the world like The Floor Is Lava if you don’t give them pathways. Also they kick non grippy rugs around. The aversion can make them avoid whole rooms, if they are the nervous type.
Yeah, I should've added that they need rugs and thick, fluffy beds if there's hard floors. We just have polished floorboards (and some tiles, but not many) around our house but in the areas we mostly use there are rugs which he gravitates towards. But like I said, following me around the rest of the house isn't an issue for him.
 
Oct 27, 2017
161
On a slightly lighter note, my wife and I have discovered that our cats do not apparently have an increased appetite, but our greyhound has been sneakily grazing on their food at night while we weren't looking! Even setting up chair barriers so only the cats can get to the food doesn't help, he just barges through. If anyone has any ideas on how to protect cat food from dogs (and it doesn't look hideous) I'd love to hear about it.
Such a shit, that dog. Then he does his hangdog expression and he gets away with it. Argh.
Haha there is absolutely no way to train a dog to leave cat food alone it seems. It's like crack to them! We have a baby gate set up in a doorway, mounted just high enough so the cats can slip under it but the dog can't. (You can also get pet gates that are basically the same thing but have a cat flap in them to let cats pass through). Doesn't look the best I suppose, but it's the most effective way we've found. I guess if you wanted to get creative you could also get some sort of box or chest with a hole or cat flap in it, then you could paint/decorate it to blend with the room (I know some people do something similar with litter trays so they're hidden away). Probably best to use a magnetic or microchip cat flap though as otherwise the dog will just stick their head right in there.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,801
Any of you guys deal with a cat with clumped or matted fur? It seems pretty bad to me (2 big clumps, couple smaller ones). Job for a groomer or a vet? The cat in question is very very anxious, and does not travel well.
 
Oct 27, 2017
209
Really sorry for your loss! :( My condolences!
Nihilistic Monk Very sorry to hear about your loss. He looks like a great cat.
Thanks for all the kind words. We're coping ok. Going to put his ashes in our garden under a tree he always liked to sit under. Taking the family out for Pizza Thursday as well as a little wake for him where we'll just celebrate the fact we had him in our lives.
 
OP
OP
Weltall Zero
Oct 26, 2017
8,855
Madrid
Greyhounds can’t handle them. They need grippy rugs. They treat the world like The Floor Is Lava if you don’t give them pathways. Also they kick non grippy rugs around. The aversion can make them avoid whole rooms, if they are the nervous type.
That's a shame. I don't think they'd want to put rugs on their house.

Haha there is absolutely no way to train a dog to leave cat food alone it seems. It's like crack to them! We have a baby gate set up in a doorway, mounted just high enough so the cats can slip under it but the dog can't. (You can also get pet gates that are basically the same thing but have a cat flap in them to let cats pass through). Doesn't look the best I suppose, but it's the most effective way we've found. I guess if you wanted to get creative you could also get some sort of box or chest with a hole or cat flap in it, then you could paint/decorate it to blend with the room (I know some people do something similar with litter trays so they're hidden away). Probably best to use a magnetic or microchip cat flap though as otherwise the dog will just stick their head right in there.
I was thinking also of those automated food dispensers that can be programmed to read your cat's identification chip before they release food. My SO saw one in action (in the home of owners of a diabetic cat) and it works as advertised.


Any of you guys deal with a cat with clumped or matted fur? It seems pretty bad to me (2 big clumps, couple smaller ones). Job for a groomer or a vet? The cat in question is very very anxious, and does not travel well.
We've rescued some cats with some very nasty fur knots, even causing sores, and sometimes the best solution is to simply cut or shave the fur and wait for it to grow back. Try brushing the cat daily instead, we particularly like Furminator brushes which are great for removing a lot of dead fur without hurting the cat at all, but if the knot won't go, just cut that Gordian knot. :)
 
Oct 27, 2017
161
I was thinking also of those automated food dispensers that can be programmed to read your cat's identification chip before they release food. My SO saw one in action (in the home of owners of a diabetic cat) and it works as advertised.

Ha you know I totally forgot we actually have 2 of them, although we had them because of a greedy cat, so we put the other cats' food in the microchip feeders so he couldn't steal it. We've stopped using them now because he stopped gorging and finally learned to regulate what he was eating. They'd probably do the trick, although our dog was very interested in the feeders and I don't think it would take much effort for her to "break in", so we still kept them behind the gate.
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,074
I like the idea of those microchip readers, but our cats don't like to be held and are indoor only, so I'm pretty sure they'll hate any kind of collar with a passion.

I'm definitely going to look into some of the ways litter is blocked off from doggos... we have a baby gate to our laundry where their litter is, but obviously the food can't go in there too!
 
OP
OP
Weltall Zero
Oct 26, 2017
8,855
Madrid
I like the idea of those microchip readers, but our cats don't like to be held and are indoor only, so I'm pretty sure they'll hate any kind of collar with a passion.

I'm definitely going to look into some of the ways litter is blocked off from doggos... we have a baby gate to our laundry where their litter is, but obviously the food can't go in there too!
No, no, they read the cat's microchips; as in, the subdermally implanted identification ones. No collars needed.

If your cats don't have a chip, you probably should put them anyway. I can't tell you how many "theoretically indoors" cats have ended up outdoors on someone's distraction.