CD Projekt RED Will Pay Andrzej Sapkowski Additional Royalties For The Witcher - Report

Oct 25, 2017
24,906
#1
The report comes from Puls Biznesu, who claims that an amicable settlement has been reached. Sapkowski will be offered further compensation from CD Projekt Red, but the amount will be much lower than what Sapkowski was asking. Additionally, this compensation is a form of recognition for Sapkowski’s work and to maintain a healthy relationship with him.
SOURCE

While I am not the biggest fan of this (it sets the wrong precedent, Sapkowski signed away the rights fully aware of what he was doing), I do admire CDPR wanting the author of the books and the creator of their biggest franchise to get more of his due, so you know, good on them.
 

PlanetSmasher

The Abominable Showman
Member
Oct 25, 2017
23,228
#2
Cool of CDPR. But part of me would honestly kind of prefer they spend that money on their employees rather than a stubborn, angry old man.
 

Nama

Member
Nov 2, 2017
117
#3
Angry old man thats popular over eastern Europe will kick up a lot more negative publicity then employees who are often under NDA.
 
Oct 25, 2017
651
#4
SOURCE

While I am not the biggest fan of this (it sets the wrong precedent, Sapkowski signed away the rights fully aware of what he was doing), I do admire CDPR wanting the author of the books and the creator of their biggest franchise to get more of his due, so you know, good on them.
They can fuck off until they pay their employees what they are "due". They are a hundred times more deserving that the author who sold the rights.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,321
#5
Given that it says the amount is much lower. I'm guessing it'll be an amount that would ultimately cost less than having the prospect of a protracted legal battle
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,635
#9
I imagine they settled on a reasonable royalty agreement. They certainly didn't have to, but it's a nice gesture to a creator who felt burned.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,030
#10
I think it's better this way. Even if they weren't legally obliged and even factoring in his anti-game stance in the past, there was something that felt really off about him having created this world and then not seeing any benefit from the enormous empire that grew out of it.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,952
#11
SOURCE

While I am not the biggest fan of this (it sets the wrong precedent, Sapkowski signed away the rights fully aware of what he was doing), I do admire CDPR wanting the author of the books and the creator of their biggest franchise to get more of his due, so you know, good on them.
The article says this is coming from a settlement so if true, then it's not exactly coming from the goodness of their hearts. Likely they giving him more recognition so they don't have to pay out more money.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,327
#12
Sapkowski doesn't really deserve it, nor do I think he conducted himself in a way that merits CD Projekt's goodwill gesture here, but that was nice of them to do. Wish they weren't rewarding him for his bad behavior but it might be worth it to potentially get him involved in some way in the future.

Now, take care of your employees.
 
Nov 27, 2017
155
#15
They can fuck off until they pay their employees what they are "due". They are a hundred times more deserving that the author who sold the rights.
Do you have proof that CDPR is not paying their employees or pays them poorly? I’m just curious.
 

PlanetSmasher

The Abominable Showman
Member
Oct 25, 2017
23,228
#19
Who created an incredible fantasyworld full of compellingcharacters
Sure. And yet he's not the one suffering here, whereas CDPR turning their full-time employees into "contractors" to get around paying them what they deserve is a far more pressing concern.
 

EkStatiC

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,241
Greece
#20
As it should be, those contracts made when this company was a very small company and with it's today size a reexamination was the right choice.
 
Nov 4, 2017
2,289
California
#21
He knew exactly what he was doing and doesn't deserve this.
Who are you to say he doesn't deserve this. Maybe he does, maybe he doesn't but most people here have no insight to one way or the other. Have you read the contract? Do you understand how these royalty agreements break down or the scope during the initial quote?
 
Oct 25, 2017
821
#23
Pretty much anyone who even pays a cursory glance to cases like this, myself included, probably figured a settlement of some type was how it was going to end.

I don't like the idea that this was done because they were nice or anything like that. There is no doubt they did this because they figured it was the best way, good chance cheapest way, to get it over with and nothing more.
 
Oct 27, 2017
7,010
#24
As it should be, those contracts made when this company was a very small company and with it's today size a reexamination was the right choice.
Yeah, ultimately compensating the author a bit more relative to the success of the game was the right thing.
 
Nov 27, 2017
155
#25
Most likely going he Glass Door reviews. They have a 3.3 rating. Some pretty vocal critics who work there.
Oh, I know a lot about working conditions in CDPR, but I have never heard that they are paying poorly compared to other companies in the gaming industry.
 
Oct 31, 2017
6,664
Barcelona
#26
Well, on one hand he clearly deserved to not receive more money and had a really bad attitude towards CDPR, but on the other hand he created all the lore and characters that for some reason most gamers think are CDPR's merit (the books have a really better writting and stories than the game of course) and made the game something good, so it's a reasonable tradeoff.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,415
#28
I said when this story first broke there was pretty much no way he was not going to get paid. They were going to lose, there was no sense in avoiding a settlement.
 
Oct 25, 2017
605
#29
Most likely going he Glass Door reviews. They have a 3.3 rating. Some pretty vocal critics who work there.
Dang, 3.3 actually seems pretty solid, it's not like people lining up to review on glassdoor if everything is going well

Anyways, glad they settled this, it was kind of an ugly look all around
 

smuguire

Self-Requested Ban
Member
Oct 27, 2017
480
#30
Now that this is over, I really wish he would admit that they capitulated to him even though they didn't have to and thank them for it

However, any public statement I've ever seen him make leads me to believe that this is a pipe dream
 
Nov 7, 2017
524
#32
They really didn't need to pay him shit but good on them for wanting to keep a healthy relationship despite Sapkowski always bad mouthing the games and saying they weren't the reason his book series is know around the world.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,931
#33
Who are you to say he doesn't deserve this. Maybe he does, maybe he doesn't but most people here have no insight to one way or the other. Have you read the contract? Do you understand how these royalty agreements break down or the scope during the initial quote?
the initial quote has he trying to screw them over, not the opposite.
 
Aug 16, 2018
474
#34
F*ck Sapkowski. The grumpy old fool won in the end. Almost talking shit the games while taking credit for the them all the time.
 
Oct 30, 2017
2,354
Tilburg
#36
What's the deal with CDPR's employees? Seen it referenced a few times in this thread, is it a Rockstar like situation?
They were reviews on Glass Door about bas working conditions at CDPR. We don't know if the stiaution is bad for sure, but it seems pretty likely when there are several reviewers stating their bad time there.
 
Oct 31, 2017
6,664
Barcelona
#37
despite Sapkowski always bad mouthing the games and saying they weren't the reason his book series is know around the world.
I dunno, most of the Geralt books were published here in Spain (and fairly well-known) before TW2 was even released, and let's be honest, the first game was not especially inspiring. It's like saying that A song of Ice and Fire was not popular before the TV series, it wasn't as mainstream as it is right now but it was fairly known betwen the phantasy book fans.
 
OP
OP
Phantom Thief
Oct 25, 2017
24,906
#38
They were reviews on Glass Door about bas working conditions at CDPR. We don't know if the stiaution is bad for sure, but it seems pretty likely when there are several reviewers stating their bad time there.
But most people won't post reviews on GlassDoor unless they're happy.
Did someone like jschreier ever corroborate these claims?
 

smuguire

Self-Requested Ban
Member
Oct 27, 2017
480
#39
I usually like to dig deep into universes that I enjoy, and have been curious about The Witcher books for a while now, but I will never buy one because I just cannot support this guy's behaviour
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,232
#40
I think it's better this way. Even if they weren't legally obliged and even factoring in his anti-game stance in the past, there was something that felt really off about him having created this world and then not seeing any benefit from the enormous empire that grew out of it.
The benefit was the CD Projekt Red popularized Witcher on the west. People started buying his books thanks to the games. We also don't know if the games were the reason Netflix licensed the series to make their TV adaptation.

So yeah, even if he didn't receive in the past any royalties for each game sold, he was still benefited by CDPR games.
 

BronsonLee

Assistant (to the) Regional Administrator
Moderator
Oct 24, 2017
12,769
#42
Ay good for him, I know he was super salty about it and being aggressive but ffs he wrote the damn books
 
Nov 7, 2017
524
#43
I dunno, most of the Geralt books were published here in Spain (and fairly well-known) before TW2 was even released, and let's be honest, the first game was not especially inspiring. It's like saying that A song of Ice and Fire was not popular before the TV series, it wasn't as mainstream as it is right now but it was fairly known betwen the phantasy book fans.
His books were translated but I highly doubt it would be as mainstream without the games. He even complained that some of the fans thought the books were based off the games which pissed him off. He's also getting a Netflix series which again I kinda doubt Netflix would have picked up without the success of The Witcher 3.
A song of Ice and Fire is massive right now, yeah the books were definitely popular but after the HBO series got popular it's a mega franchise now. Same goes for Lord of The Rings with the movies.
 
Oct 27, 2017
752
#44
Hopefully this is behind them now. Really glad they won’t have to repeat this mess with Mike Pondsmith. He seems really excited and pleased with everything in his relationship with CDPR.
 
Oct 27, 2017
919
#45
Ay good for him, I know he was super salty about it and being aggressive but ffs he wrote the damn books
I agree. I'm glad they came to an agreement. He was naive when he made the initial deal but without him, we would never have The Witcher. He deserved more than he got.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,651
#46
But most people won't post reviews on GlassDoor unless they're happy.
Did someone like jschreier ever corroborate these claims?
There was also this response from a co-founder regarding crunch last year at E3 which doesn't paint a great image, especially when paired with some of the GlassDoor reviews.
Earlier this year, employees of the French studio Eugen Systems went on strike for more than a month. In March, the United Game Workers Unite, an advocacy organization for employees in the video game industry was formed in the United States. What do you think of these initiatives?

Adam Badowski: It's a very difficult job, everyone knows, and improvements are always possible. But I do not know if the unions can contribute to it. We should find our own solutions.

Marcin Iwinski: That's what we do! It's true that we do lot of overtime, and when people join us, we warn them that it's really not easy. Releasing a game is, every time, as hard as sending people to Mars. But if there are unions, what do we do? We do not take off anymore? Originally, unions were created to protect low-paid workers, right? These guys are not low paid workers, they are extremely skilled professionals.

Adam Badowski: I think that changes for the better. For example, before, the industry did not pay overtime.

Marcin Iwinski: It's really blood, sweat and tears. From the outside, the video game industry seems to be a big success story. People who do not know the industry think that everything is rosy. It's really very, very hard, and people who decide to make a career in this business have to make a lot of sacrifices regularly.

Adam Badowski: But when you start a game, a trailer, a demo, you have to see the reactions. Today, in Warsaw, at the head office of CD Projekt, there is joy, noise, and everyone is happy!
 
Apr 16, 2018
1,727
#47
One day creators won’t so brazenly sell the rights to their creations for a quick cash grab. Glad he was able to get himself more bread for the world he created.
 

Yasuke

Banned
Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,274
#48
Eh. Cool of CDPR, I guess. Dude signed away his rights to this fully aware of what he was doing, so I never had much sympathy for his situation. Especially since I’m sure the success of the games increased interest in his books.
 
Oct 31, 2017
6,664
Barcelona
#49
He even complained that some of the fans thought the books were based off the games which pissed him off.
Well I can kind of understand this, more if we take into consideration that he is old. I mean, the merit of creating the characters, universe, dark fantasy tone is entirely his merit, nobody likes when somebody else uses you work (in a inferior way in this case) and nobody likes when everybody who doesn't know better forgets about you or thinks that somebody else created your lore/universe.

It's true that thanks to CDPR the Witcher universe is expanding a lot, but is also true that in the phantasy book market there is a lot of old, strong and well known competitors, while in the western RPG market now that Bioware isn't doing anything decent, it's easier to take the attention of the people if you do something different or mature.
 

Budi

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,389
Finland
#50
Nice. It's what I was saying, pay the dude but what he was asking might be too much. What he initially got, was definitely way too little.
I dunno, most of the Geralt books were published here in Spain (and fairly well-known) before TW2 was even released, and let's be honest, the first game was not especially inspiring. It's like saying that A song of Ice and Fire was not popular before the TV series, it wasn't as mainstream as it is right now but it was fairly known betwen the phantasy book fans.
Yeah the books were well known and also awarded in different parts of Europe, even before the first game was released. Which didn't set the world on fire either, the two first games sold best on regions where the books were released/translated.
 
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