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Coffee Thread - The ERA of continued caffeine addiction

OP
OP
skeptem
Oct 25, 2017
1,075
Question: Which has more caffeine? A dark roast or a medium or a light roast?
The short answer is they all have about the same amount of caffeine. Caffeine is very heat stable. But there can be a loss of mass in the roasting process that would mean that equal weights of bean might have different small levels of caffeine.

https://www.kickinghorsecoffee.com/en/blog/caffeine-myths-dark-vs-light
So, how does this change a pot of coffee?

If you measure your coffee by scoops, light roasted coffee will have more caffeine. Since the beans are denser than a darker roast. However if you weigh out your scoops, darker roasts will have more caffeine, because there is less mass. What should also be noted is that Arabica beans vary in levels of caffeine depending on the plant species.

And, as we know from our caffeine basics the amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee is so minimal, we might not even notice the difference.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,346
Hey everyone...I want to get my wife something coffee related for Christmas (as a stocking stuffer). We love making cold brew from fresh beans - so a delicious bean recommendation would be great - but I'd also be down for any other recommendation too (mugs, etc).

Thank you!
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,875
Do you guys have any recommendations for travel mugs? I've had trouble in the past buying things that don't absorb tastes.
 
OP
OP
skeptem
Oct 25, 2017
1,075
Hey everyone...I want to get my wife something coffee related for Christmas (as a stocking stuffer). We love making cold brew from fresh beans - so a delicious bean recommendation would be great - but I'd also be down for any other recommendation too (mugs, etc).

Thank you!
I would probably just start with a bag of fresh roasted coffee from a local shop. If you want more of an item, a v60 or aeropress are good and can be usually found for less than $25.

Do you guys have any recommendations for travel mugs? I've had trouble in the past buying things that don't absorb tastes.
This is always a good question. I have a contigo ss travel mug and it doesn't leave a taste but it definitely affects the flavor over time. I've heard good things about the zojurushi mugs but they are more pricey. A lot of other people use ceramic but it doesn't insulate as well.
 
Oct 27, 2017
430
Philadelphia
I've always been a cream and sugar guy (Since age 10), but 2 weeks ago I had French press coffee for the first time and it changed my whole perception.

I've now gone all black. Now I can build from here, find some actual good coffee instead of a good Cream/sugar mix.
 
Oct 25, 2017
261
Denver, CO
Anyone try Bourbon Barrel aged coffee?

Kinda want to try some but not sure if you even get any of the barrel characteristics. Anyone have it before and have a brand to recommend?
 
Oct 27, 2017
563
Toronto, Canada
I've always been a cream and sugar guy (Since age 10), but 2 weeks ago I had French press coffee for the first time and it changed my whole perception.

I've now gone all black. Now I can build from here, find some actual good coffee instead of a good Cream/sugar mix.
Good stuff. Cream and sugar are typically used to mask bitter/sour flavors that are undesirable in coffee, often due to the beans not being freshly roasted. I've been buying coffee for the last year or so from a local roaster who roasts daily, and the difference vs. any other bagged beans I've purchased in the past is substantial. Suppliers who ship coffee and/or sell in supermarkets obviously have an interest in claims that beans are fresher longer (due to their sealed bags with the valve), but I have found anything after 7-10 days starts to decline regardless of how it's been stored/sealed.

I've also found that coffee is easy to roast at home, and green beans last for years if stored properly.
 
Oct 25, 2017
616
So my favourite coffee to get frankly isn't practical for me right now living in the US. When I was back in Toronto recently I picked up two bags of this, but to get hit shipped down here is gonna cost way too much. Anyone got some suggestions for something with a similar flavour profile but I can get without spending like 2000 bucks (or I guess maybe 20) on shipping to Los Angeles?


It's roasted very dark, I'd say just before hitting French Roast status. I'm open to trying some new options, but not sure where to go
 
Nov 24, 2017
56
Los Angeles
Then the Encore should work well. I like how the Encore/Virtuoso/Preciso are easy to fix too when things go wrong. A used one should not be a problem either.
I have the Encore. It's great to have. I usually use a setting of 21-22 when using a Chemex, but you can play around with it and find a setting you like.
Awesome! Thanks for the recommendation.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,260
I know this is probably blasphemy in this thread, but here goes.

I've always been somewhat of a coffee guy, but never really brewed at home. The family purchased me a Keurig Elite for Christmas, along with an assortment of K-Cups. Problem is, everything tastes super watered down. I've tried the strong brew setting combined with smaller cup sized and it still just taste like coffee flavored water. I'm pretty certain its because the water just isn't reaching the correct temperature needed for brewing coffee. I've read this is a common complaint with these machines, but I'm wondering if mine is worse than usual. I like a dash of milk in my coffee and that alone cools my coffee down to not hot. This is not the case with the coffee brewed at work. That comes our scorching hot, this just like a bit hotter than hot tap water. Is this just typical of Keurig machines or is there potentially something wrong with it? I'd hate to return it or tell the family I hate it since it was a gift, but this charade can only continue for so long, this "coffee" stinks. Is there something I'm missing?
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,050
Keurigs really shouldn't be that cold. You can test it by running it without a pod and seeing how hot the water is.

Which Keurig do you have? Some of them have a temperature setting...
 

stn

Member
Oct 28, 2017
814
So my favourite coffee to get frankly isn't practical for me right now living in the US. When I was back in Toronto recently I picked up two bags of this, but to get hit shipped down here is gonna cost way too much. Anyone got some suggestions for something with a similar flavour profile but I can get without spending like 2000 bucks (or I guess maybe 20) on shipping to Los Angeles?


It's roasted very dark, I'd say just before hitting French Roast status. I'm open to trying some new options, but not sure where to go
This looks fantastic. Where in TO did you buy it? Thank you.
 
Oct 25, 2017
616
This looks fantastic. Where in TO did you buy it? Thank you.
Quantum coffee at King and Spadina. Funny enough I'm in town visiting so I'm going to grab a few lbs later today. I'm not up to date on the latest shops but when I moved away quantum was my favourite
 
Oct 28, 2017
619
Received a Chemex for Christmas after my French Press was on its last legs. It feels more complicated to make coffee, but I love how clean it is.

Any suggestions for brewing? I feel like I don't have it exactly quite right yet
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,149
Received a Chemex for Christmas after my French Press was on its last legs. It feels more complicated to make coffee, but I love how clean it is.

Any suggestions for brewing? I feel like I don't have it exactly quite right yet
No expert with a Chemex, but it's basically hand filter so the same procedure applies. Use a medium to fine grind. Pouring water on the empty filter helps, but since you can't take off the filter cone on a Chemex you might want to do that before putting it in. After putting the ground coffee in, pour a little water in and let the ground coffee soak in it for a bit before continuing to pour the rest of the water (should be around 90°C)

Just a little tip: instead of using the expensive foldable official filter paper, you can use any filter paper that is strong and big enough. (Flimsy paper can rip or straight up slip down under the weight)
 
Nov 24, 2017
56
Los Angeles
Received a Chemex for Christmas after my French Press was on its last legs. It feels more complicated to make coffee, but I love how clean it is.

Any suggestions for brewing? I feel like I don't have it exactly quite right yet
I got a Chemex for Christmas as well and while it seems like a lot of work at the beginning it will become easier with more practice.
I've learned to really appreciate the process.

I used this guide as a starting point Blue Bottle Chemex Guide
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,361
Hey everyone...I want to get my wife something coffee related for Christmas (as a stocking stuffer). We love making cold brew from fresh beans - so a delicious bean recommendation would be great - but I'd also be down for any other recommendation too (mugs, etc).

Thank you!
Cold brew is wonderful, but it does tend to flatten out a lot of the flavor notes you'd get from a hot brew, so you might be best off getting the most affordable freshly roasted beans you can in a roast you like and not sweating the details too much.

Also, if you've got a good blender, try making a chicory syrup and preparing some Cold Brew Fogs: 8 oz cold brew coffee (or 4oz cold brew concentrate + 4 oz filtered water), chicory syrup to taste, 1/3 cup ice. Blend until the ice has disintegrated and the whole drink is foamy, then pour into an ice-filled glass. The drink should resemble a nitro stout.

Received a Chemex for Christmas after my French Press was on its last legs. It feels more complicated to make coffee, but I love how clean it is.

Any suggestions for brewing? I feel like I don't have it exactly quite right yet
Temperature control and grind are very important with the Chemex, but once you have it down it makes an exquisite cup of coffee.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,346
Cold brew is wonderful, but it does tend to flatten out a lot of the flavor notes you'd get from a hot brew, so you might be best off getting the most affordable freshly roasted beans you can in a roast you like and not sweating the details too much.

Also, if you've got a good blender, try making a chicory syrup and preparing some Cold Brew Fogs: 8 oz cold brew coffee (or 4oz cold brew concentrate + 4 oz filtered water), chicory syrup to taste, 1/3 cup ice. Blend until the ice has disintegrated and the whole drink is foamy, then pour into an ice-filled glass. The drink should resemble a nitro stout.
Sounds delicious...will try!!
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,346
I had one at Peet's Coffee and immediately went looking around for a recipe.

The chicory syrup is optional, but pleasant; in a pinch, you can use whatever other syrup you like.
Never had chicory before. What's the overall taste? Earthy like coffee or sweet?
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,361
Never had chicory before. What's the overall taste? Earthy like coffee or sweet?
Earthy - it's a root that was once upon a time roasted and ground and added to coffee as a means of stretching the supply. If you've ever had Cafe du Monde ground coffee, or perhaps Vietnamese coffee at a pho restaurant (which, in the US, almost always uses Cafe du Monde), you've had coffee with chicory.

You can get it roasted and ground on Amazon. Making the syrup is just as easy as boiling sugar, water, and chicory, letting it brew, then straining out the chicory.
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
4,051
Yeah, chicory is an interesting taste. My parents are so used to drinking a blend of coffee/chicory that they seem to like it more than any single origin or coffee only blend I brew for them when they visit.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,361
Yeah, chicory is an interesting taste. My parents are so used to drinking a blend of coffee/chicory that they seem to like it more than any single origin or coffee only blend I brew for them when they visit.
I enjoy it all, but if I'm making Vietnamese coffee, chicory is a must.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,346
Earthy - it's a root that was once upon a time roasted and ground and added to coffee as a means of stretching the supply.If you've ever had Cafe du Monde ground coffee, or perhaps Vietnamese coffee at a pho restaurant (which, in the US, almost always uses Cafe du Monde), you've had coffee with chicory.

You can get it roasted and ground on Amazon. Making the syrup is just as easy as boiling sugar, water, and chicory, letting it brew, then straining out the chicory.
Ah yes, I've had Vietnamese coffee many times!
 

jcs

Member
Aug 7, 2018
1,598
Been lazying around and doing moka pot + whatever beans I have or Cafe Bustelo and honestly it’s been more than good enough. Anyone have favorite beans or pre-ground coffee for moka pots?
 
I recently bought an electronic coffee grinder.
I exclusively used pre grounded coffee I bought and put it in my french press.

Now I bought full beans and always grind them freshly seconds before brewing coffee and I have to say that the difference is impressive. I just realized how much flavor gets lost if you let them grind your coffee and then let it sit for days or weeks in a bag.
I felt like I had lived the life of a coffee-cavemen before grinding my own beans.
 
Oct 27, 2017
563
Toronto, Canada
I recently bought an electronic coffee grinder.
I exclusively used pre grounded coffee I bought and put it in my french press.

Now I bought full beans and always grind them freshly seconds before brewing coffee and I have to say that the difference is impressive. I just realized how much flavor gets lost if you let them grind your coffee and then let it sit for days or weeks in a bag.
I felt like I had lived the life of a coffee-cavemen before grinding my own beans.
Agreed. Getting beans roasted within 1-2 days and grinding them right before brewing is a game changer for sure.
 

Eros

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,202
Got an aeropress for Christmas. I like it. Two scoops and the coffee comes out nice and strong. Don't even have to let it brew for that long.
 
OP
OP
skeptem
Oct 25, 2017
1,075
Been lazying around and doing moka pot + whatever beans I have or Cafe Bustelo and honestly it’s been more than good enough. Anyone have favorite beans or pre-ground coffee for moka pots?
Used to drink Bustello every day. My whole family lives off of Bustello since they are from PR. I've actually been to their roasting facility and it's pretty impressive I think a lot of people are suprised to find out they are owned by Smuckers. In terms of recommendations for a moka pot, I would always just say go try some darker roasts from your local coffee roaster and see if anything is to your liking.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,149
Agreed. Getting beans roasted within 1-2 days and grinding them right before brewing is a game changer for sure.
You should let the freshly roasted beans rest for a few days (one or two days). The taste changes a bit and at least for Espresso, the excess of CO2 in freshly roasted beans ruins the crema. With Filter or brewed coffee that's not really an issue.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,106
Redmond, WA
Got a super automatic coffee machine and I'm learning it is recommended that i use drier/less oily coffee beans. How do I know what beans are dry vs oily without visually looking at the bean?
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,149
Got a super automatic coffee machine and I'm learning it is recommended that i use drier/less oily coffee beans. How do I know what beans are dry vs oily without visually looking at the bean?
Oily beans are usually (not always) older and the oil on the surface can go rancid. Dry beans look well, dry. Oil comes out after a while and little droplets and oil smears start appearing. (depending on the roast, bean and storage this can happen after a few days or after months) Eventually the beans get coated in oil, and become sticky (they stick to the inside of the bag they come in for example)
This happens faster with darker roasts, and slower with lighter roasts (still depends on the beans as well)

Aside from getting rancid, oily beans can clog grinders after a while. Since Automatics use very tiny grinders, it's usually worse there.

Don't panic though, there is cleaning powder for grinders, or just use uncooked white rice to clean the oil out of the grinder.

As a rule of thumb, try buying as fresh as possible. Look at the roast date, not the shelf date. Anything that was roasted within one or two weeks before you buy it should be fine, provided it is packaged straight after roasting in a one way valve bag.
Buy in small batches.
 
Oct 27, 2017
563
Toronto, Canada
You should let the freshly roasted beans rest for a few days (one or two days). The taste changes a bit and at least for Espresso, the excess of CO2 in freshly roasted beans ruins the crema. With Filter or brewed coffee that's not really an issue.
Ah interesting. I'm not as familiar with espresso, but that makes sense.

Regarding brewed coffee, I've heard letting beans rest is a myth perpetuated by roasters (for obvious reasons haha). I roasted some coffee at home over the holidays and brewed it when it had cooled - the results were amazing.
 
OP
OP
skeptem
Oct 25, 2017
1,075
Got a super automatic coffee machine and I'm learning it is recommended that i use drier/less oily coffee beans. How do I know what beans are dry vs oily without visually looking at the bean?
Just stay away from dark roasts. Ideally just take a look at the beans beforehand.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,106
Redmond, WA
Oily beans are usually (not always) older and the oil on the surface can go rancid. Dry beans look well, dry. Oil comes out after a while and little droplets and oil smears start appearing. (depending on the roast, bean and storage this can happen after a few days or after months) Eventually the beans get coated in oil, and become sticky (they stick to the inside of the bag they come in for example)
This happens faster with darker roasts, and slower with lighter roasts (still depends on the beans as well)

Aside from getting rancid, oily beans can clog grinders after a while. Since Automatics use very tiny grinders, it's usually worse there.

Don't panic though, there is cleaning powder for grinders, or just use uncooked white rice to clean the oil out of the grinder.

As a rule of thumb, try buying as fresh as possible. Look at the roast date, not the shelf date. Anything that was roasted within one or two weeks before you buy it should be fine, provided it is packaged straight after roasting in a one way valve bag.
Buy in small batches.
Thanks this is helpful.
 
Oct 27, 2017
28
Used to drink Bustello every day. My whole family lives off of Bustello since they are from PR. I've actually been to their roasting facility and it's pretty impressive I think a lot of people are suprised to find out they are owned by Smuckers. In terms of recommendations for a moka pot, I would always just say go try some darker roasts from your local coffee roaster and see if anything is to your liking.
Just bought Bustello on a whim because it was cheap at Wal-Mart. I like it quite a bit. Make it using pour over.
 
Oct 25, 2017
201
I didn't realize there was a coffee thread on ERA, pretty sure I remember one from the old site. Anyway, I just read the first post and maybe I'll give the longer french press method of letting the grinds and water rest for the longer time. I've been doing 3-4 minutes forever.