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Coffee Thread - The ERA of continued caffeine addiction

OP
OP
skeptem
Oct 25, 2017
1,026
Does anyone have recommendations on all in one/portable coffee makers? Thinking about something I can just load beans into in the morning, grind and then add hot water for a nice afternoon cup of drip coffee.

Looking at the following:
ROMAUNT
Cafflano Klassic
Soulhand
I've always been interested in one of these but my brain always goes to the fact that I could just use a hand grinder and a v60 to accomplish the same result. I would probably go with whatever one has the best grinder.
 

Midramble

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
2,544
San Francisco
I use a hario skerton hand grinder with a moka pot for my travels. Been traveling a lot for work the last 2 months and they go everywhere with me. Was doing messenger coffee in KC and now noble tree in NYC. Kobe roast at home. Coffee round the world.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,229
What's a good manual grinder to get for french press(coarse grind) coffee? I've looked around and everybody seems to be saying that the cheap (sub $50) grinders are horrible for coarse grinds but outside of a few very expensive grinders that aren't even available here in japan I haven't been able to find good recommendations on more affordable options(willing to pay up to $100).
 
Oct 27, 2017
113
What's a good manual grinder to get for french press(coarse grind) coffee? I've looked around and everybody seems to be saying that the cheap (sub $50) grinders are horrible for coarse grinds but outside of a few very expensive grinders that aren't even available here in japan I haven't been able to find good recommendations on more affordable options(willing to pay up to $100).
I recently bought a Comandante C40 MK3 manual grinder. I'm totally new to the whole coffee at home game, so I felt like a bit of a twat splurging on what seems to be an expensive grinder and then all the other equipment. And whilst I literally have no frame of reference as to what good black coffee should taste like. I'm very very happy with the Comandante.

As far as I'm aware. The Comandante (£200) and the Kinu m47 (£300) are seen as the best manual grinders money can buy (Outside of some crazy £1000 big stationary one!). I think the better quality grinders are more important for espresso, as the extraction seems massively important for those. But with french press being immersion I've been told it's not as important. Especially after reading some of James Hoffman's notes.

Speaking of James Hoffman, I don't know if he has been mentioned in this thread; but I'm currently trying his French Press method, a lot of people rave about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=st571DYYTR8

He also just released a video on cheaper (sub £70 i think) grinders and compared them all. Isn't Hario a Japanese brand? Maybe you could find one over there. It seems to be his favourite of the bunch and is more than capable of producing a good cup. He said he's going to be taking the best performer of the cheap grinders and putting it against the most expensive. So that should answer your question when it comes out :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLEBfom0mhM&t=

With his technique. As soon as the grinds start to fall and sit at the bottom. The extraction pretty much stops to a halt, as long as you don't bring them back up into the coffee. So getting an even extraction shouldn't be as important as something like a pour over? Those are his words anyway. I'm still getting my head around everything. Hope this helps either way!
 
Last edited:
Jan 11, 2018
346
The Hario Skerton Pro looks to be a decent grinder for the price, I think it's around the $100 mark? I'd look at reviews, but it has improved stability at the top of the shaft over the original Skerton, which should reduce burr wobble and benefit coarser grind consistency.

I also bought a Comandante in January and would highly recommend it. I almost bought the Kinu Traveller, but there weren't many reviews and I really needed a grinder at the time. The static in the glass catcher and burr area takes some getting used to, and I'm not sure I like the one piece plastic hopper lid / handle, but the coffee's been good.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,229
We seem to be in a similar situation :)
I just ordered the kinu m47 traveler a few days ago. It's the same as the m47 except a smaller 25 g capacity for 100 less. Shipping at 70 is brutal though.

I thought about the Hario but allegedly it's bad for anything coarse and I already have a cheap mill so instead of buying something I'll want to replace soon I went for the best I could find... at triple my original budget.

I've used that Hoffman method the last few weeks and I am very happy with it. It's actually the reason I decided to get a good grinder since it woke me up on how much better coffee can taste if you put some effort into it. Chris Baca also has a nice video with a variation on the method.

Also signed up with a bean subscription service. I've yet to receive the first batch but my hope is that this will get me acquainted with a good variety of coffee.
 
Last edited:
Oct 27, 2017
113
The Kinu M47 is definitely a 'step up' from your original budget :D It does look a beast though

I gave the Hoffman method a try and it was really sour. I was super careful to not disturb the grounds once they settled to the bottom; only pushed the mesh sieve to the very top of the coffee. 4 minutes initially > broke the crust and scooped out everything on the top > 8 minute wait after. God damn it sucked :p

The other variable is the grind size. I went for more medium/course than course. Going to try again tonight with some different beans.

https://imgur.com/PKSEWKh
https://imgur.com/HMC0jFq

What do you guys think?

Also I'm very up for a subscription service - My problem though is that in the UK I've been recommended like two dozen roasters!
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,229
Got the Kinu grinder yesterday. Despite the high price I couldn't be happier with it. At almost 600 g it's quite heavy and robust. No crappy sheet metal like my old grinder: the thing looks like it's been milled from a solid piece of steel. There's also this subtle click when you rotate the handle that makes it feel very satisfying to use. Overall it's built more like a high precision instrument than your regular home appliance. I did some test grinds at various size settings and even at extra coarse they all looked very consistent to me.

The one thing that bothers me a little is that grind settings apparently are relative to each unique grinder(zero point is different) so you can't easily share adjustment settings. I was hoping that I could find a good starting point online but it looks like I'll have to experiment and figure out the best settings for myself.

I gave the Hoffman method a try and it was really sour. I was super careful to not disturb the grounds once they settled to the bottom; only pushed the mesh sieve to the very top of the coffee. 4 minutes initially > broke the crust and scooped out everything on the top > 8 minute wait after. God damn it sucked :p
Seems like sour taste is a symptom of over extraction so maybe lower the time a little or go for a coarser grind. Personally I prefer leaving the sieve at the top like Baca and then pour the coffee very carefully.
Another thing I've been hearing is to not use too hot/boiling water. Try going in at 93-96 centigrade if you aren't already.

I'm a beginner with all this stuff so you probably shouldn't listen to me though.
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
267
Puget Sound
Ahhhh now this is my thread - I currently use a Kalita Wave and an Aeropress as my main coffee makers along with an Encore as my grinder. I mostly stick to S&W as they jive well with my shoestring student budget, but I've been looking to branch out from them lately. Are there any other reasonably priced roasters with an online presence that have reasonably priced beans?
 
Oct 26, 2017
241
Ahhhh now this is my thread - I currently use a Kalita Wave and an Aeropress as my main coffee makers along with an Encore as my grinder. I mostly stick to S&W as they jive well with my shoestring student budget, but I've been looking to branch out from them lately. Are there any other reasonably priced roasters with an online presence that have reasonably priced beans?
I've been loving Onyx Coffee Lab lately. Their Southern Weather blend is delicious.
 
Oct 27, 2017
113
Seems like sour taste is a symptom of over extraction so maybe lower the time a little or go for a coarser grind. Personally I prefer leaving the sieve at the top like Baca and then pour the coffee very carefully.
Another thing I've been hearing is to not use too hot/boiling water. Try going in at 93-96 centigrade if you aren't already.

I'm a beginner with all this stuff so you probably shouldn't listen to me though.
I'll give that a try! I tend to use the the French Press for when people are round. And the cleanup takes the mick so it puts me off sometimes haha. I went to a local coffee roasters over the weekend and had them make an Aeropress. Damn it was so much better than my piss poor attempt - Using the same beans as me no less! It's great knowing that I have something to work towards either way. And yeah regarding the temperature, the barista recommended to never go over 95 degrees.

So whilst I didn't taste any 'fruity notes' or 'caramel apple', 'sweet peach' that these pro's will talk about (lies?!) I did taste something really nice that wasn't bitter at all :)
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,229
So whilst I didn't taste any 'fruity notes' or 'caramel apple', 'sweet peach' that these pro's will talk about (lies?!) I did taste something really nice that wasn't bitter at all :)
Yup, I actually started a coffee diary when I got the new grinder. With so many variables it seems impossible to dial in the parameters correctly unless you keep some record of what you are doing.
Currently I track grind(the exact setting on my grinder), water temp, brewing method, brewing time, coffee/water ratio and the bean of course. I'm not familiar with the vernacular for talking about coffee but I try to write a few words about how the cup tasted. I change one variable at a time(between 4-5 cups) - at the moment I'm only tuning the grind.
It might seem like a lot of work but it only takes a minute and I actually quite like the process. Even just thinking about what words to use when describing what a cup tastes like made me aware about the taste in a way I had not noticed before. Hopefully with experience and practice I'll be able to wing the right settings without much effort.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,436
I can't even remember the last time I posted here but I may as well give an update on my setup:

Aeropress + Fellow Prismo + Paper Filter
Cheapo Programmable Kettle (Doctor Hezner on Amazon)
Hario Skerton Pro (grind setting is 6 notches back from fully closed)

I don't have a scale yet so I don't have exact measurements on coffee and water ratio, but I fill up the Hario to just above the plastic separators. Then add in 183 F (81 C) water up to nearly the top, stir, then fill to top. Total brew time is 2.5 minutes then extract.

Hot damn does it make a good, dark as all hell coffee. Zero grinds make it through.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,595
So whilst I didn't taste any 'fruity notes' or 'caramel apple', 'sweet peach' that these pro's will talk about (lies?!) I did taste something really nice that wasn't bitter at all :)

Try this: brew the coffee without reading the notes first. Many coffee pros will suggest this to newer drinkers who are trying to identify notes in coffee. Why? When you read something your mind attaches to those notes and looks to fixate on finding them in the coffee. The reality is the notes are often VERY subtle and can be hard to pick out without knowing explicitly what to look for. For example, the note of 'caramel' could be an after taste when you're looking for it as it hits the palate.

Here's the SCAA official flavor wheel: https://www.scanews.coffee/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/SCAA_FlavorWheel.01.18.15.jpg

This is something they've been trying to get roasters & competitors to standardized against because so many roasters began to get way too cute with their profiles. Familiarize yourself with what some of these are and then you can begin to pick up notes a bit more. One way to try and work on this is to stick with a particular country + profile for 2 or 3 bags, another is to actually taste these things.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,595
Ahhhh now this is my thread - I currently use a Kalita Wave and an Aeropress as my main coffee makers along with an Encore as my grinder. I mostly stick to S&W as they jive well with my shoestring student budget, but I've been looking to branch out from them lately. Are there any other reasonably priced roasters with an online presence that have reasonably priced beans?
Ruby
Onyx
Passenger
Novel
Equator
Tandem
Stay Gold
Blueprint
Roseline
GGEtLA
Kuma
Huckleberry
Commonwealth
 
Oct 27, 2017
113
Yup, I actually started a coffee diary when I got the new grinder. With so many variables it seems impossible to dial in the parameters correctly unless you keep some record of what you are doing.
Currently I track grind(the exact setting on my grinder), water temp, brewing method, brewing time, coffee/water ratio and the bean of course. I'm not familiar with the vernacular for talking about coffee but I try to write a few words about how the cup tasted. I change one variable at a time(between 4-5 cups) - at the moment I'm only tuning the grind.
It might seem like a lot of work but it only takes a minute and I actually quite like the process. Even just thinking about what words to use when describing what a cup tastes like made me aware about the taste in a way I had not noticed before. Hopefully with experience and practice I'll be able to wing the right settings without much effort.
Try this: brew the coffee without reading the notes first. Many coffee pros will suggest this to newer drinkers who are trying to identify notes in coffee. Why? When you read something your mind attaches to those notes and looks to fixate on finding them in the coffee. The reality is the notes are often VERY subtle and can be hard to pick out without knowing explicitly what to look for. For example, the note of 'caramel' could be an after taste when you're looking for it as it hits the palate.

Here's the SCAA official flavor wheel: https://www.scanews.coffee/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/SCAA_FlavorWheel.01.18.15.jpg

This is something they've been trying to get roasters & competitors to standardized against because so many roasters began to get way too cute with their profiles. Familiarize yourself with what some of these are and then you can begin to pick up notes a bit more. One way to try and work on this is to stick with a particular country + profile for 2 or 3 bags, another is to actually taste these things.
Thanks guys. I've printed out the chart and keep it to hand when im brewing. I'm planning on doing a cupping with the 2 bags I currently have and I think I'll be sticking with south american for the time being - I was really thrown off by how fine the grind was at my local roasters with their Aeropress - So I'm gonna stick with that for the time being until I can get similar results!
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,595
Thanks guys. I've printed out the chart and keep it to hand when im brewing. I'm planning on doing a cupping with the 2 bags I currently have and I think I'll be sticking with south american for the time being - I was really thrown off by how fine the grind was at my local roasters with their Aeropress - So I'm gonna stick with that for the time being until I can get similar results!
Most people go hog wild and try to do way too much when they’re first getting into things. They buy 8 breeding devices and try 40 different brewing methods. Just pick one that works for you and stick with it. My go to is kalitta wave, then a v60 and then aeropress. I only bust out the chemex for larger batches. I want to throw my moka pot into a dumpster
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,450
My Aeropress game is so bad. Thought I was developing it a bit but it hasn't got much better in all honesty. Chemex comes out consistently better.
 
Oct 27, 2017
113
Most people go hog wild and try to do way too much when they’re first getting into things. They buy 8 breeding devices and try 40 different brewing methods. Just pick one that works for you and stick with it. My go to is kalitta wave, then a v60 and then aeropress. I only bust out the chemex for larger batches. I want to throw my moka pot into a dumpster
Yeah point taken! I'll definitely keep it all reined in from now on. Regarding the Wave, my go to recipe has been the George Howell one - I was looking at the Onyx coffee recipe as an alternative - Mainly because I wanted to see what stirring the bloom would do. Which method do you follow?
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,595
Yeah point taken! I'll definitely keep it all reined in from now on. Regarding the Wave, my go to recipe has been the George Howell one - I was looking at the Onyx coffee recipe as an alternative - Mainly because I wanted to see what stirring the bloom would do. Which method do you follow?
I probably use an amalgamation of ones. Look up the pulse method that won brewers cup a few years back. His was the first I saw using it and I experimented with that for a bit. I’m pretty sure it was James McCarthy
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,581
Ugh. My local roaster/coffee shop owners turn out to have been racist shitheads all along and are spitefully closing shop now because the employees unionised and demanded fair & equal treatment (not even a raise). Will have to see where they go and follow them, they are good baristas/roasters who know their stuff.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,611
I bought a Bonavita Connoisseur recently. Aka BV1901. For anyone considering it...it's pretty fantastic. I've stopped using my Aeropress since but of course it may not be the best option if you're only making 1 cup for yourself. But if you're making for 2+, everyone should get the machine. NOW.
 
Oct 31, 2017
2,752
BJs ground coffee
Hamilton Beach drip coffee machine.

Pour in water and coffee, set timer, and drink in the AM as I'm out the door.

On weekends, when I have time (newborn and a toddler) I grind my own, usually TJs, and use a French press or cowboy style.