COMICS!!!|OT| July 2019 | No, More Mutants!

Frank Quietly faces - Potato, Not Potato?

  • Potato

  • Not Potato


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Vic_Viper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,860
Yea I agree. I havent gotten around to reading everything that was posted today while I was at work, but his posts are always super insightful and well thought out.

EDIT: Just read the Conan post, holy shit that was great lol. Is Savage Sword of Conan an Anthology series, where every issue is different or is it each arc?
 
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BKatastrophe

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,419
I think Al Ewing is the only Marvel writer that remembers and uses ___________
Congrats on whatever Al Ewing comic you’re reading
And we already know they're going to be back. Agents of Wakanda won't last too long.
I’m super excited for AoW because it’s the new Secret Warriors.
Can I safely skip this 3 part Josh Trank interview on Fatman on Batman?
Who the fuck needs like, 6 hours of Kevin Smith coughing up weed smoke talking about F4ntastic?

But also who DOESN’T need that?
i didn't think i'd be an Elixir fan, but here we are.
Congratulations on my exact feelings after finishing that run.
Sounds like comics just need to be more like Bleach
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
1,282
I gotta mostly agree with Manmademan. The downfall and stagnation of comic sales is almost entirely the result of Diamond's monopoly and the direct market. And frankly, unless something major happens like manga distributors heavily moving into traditional comics or a company like Amazon that would be immediately capable of offering a competitive alternative to Diamond coming in, the comics industry is heavily limited in its potential.

There's just too much evidence that shows how inflexible the comics industry is. Diamond and the direct market have a stranglehold. We got DC pumping out Batman books hoping to capitalize on their best-seller. We've got Marvel realizing it's easier to get smaller comics up to profitable number so it's hoping to make a lot of those (while also capitalizing on their major brands). Image doesn't even seem like it's trying to grow its business anymore as opposed to maintaining its current success. Everyone's just settled in and optimizing. Maximizing sales within well-known parameters.

What's his name can joke about the "million seller" all he wants, but everyone in the business knows where things stand. Comics are what they are. The rest is all cross-media marketing for movies and toys and cartoons and keeping JJ Abrams happy by letting his son write a Spider-Man book and so on.
 

Weiss

Member
Oct 25, 2017
16,215
Is Batman/TMNT worth reading? Both volumes are on sale.

Eh fuhgeddaboudit. I need to buy more Vinland Saga.
 
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mreddie

Member
Oct 26, 2017
11,204
I gotta mostly agree with Manmademan. The downfall and stagnation of comic sales is almost entirely the result of Diamond's monopoly and the direct market. And frankly, unless something major happens like manga distributors heavily moving into traditional comics or a company like Amazon that would be immediately capable of offering a competitive alternative to Diamond coming in, the comics industry is heavily limited in its potential.

There's just too much evidence that shows how inflexible the comics industry is. Diamond and the direct market have a stranglehold. We got DC pumping out Batman books hoping to capitalize on their best-seller. We've got Marvel realizing it's easier to get smaller comics up to profitable number so it's hoping to make a lot of those (while also capitalizing on their major brands). Image doesn't even seem like it's trying to grow its business anymore as opposed to maintaining its current success. Everyone's just settled in and optimizing. Maximizing sales within well-known parameters.

What's his name can joke about the "million seller" all he wants, but everyone in the business knows where things stand. Comics are what they are. The rest is all cross-media marketing for movies and toys and cartoons and keeping JJ Abrams happy by letting his son write a Spider-Man book and so on.
And the kicker? These books outsell them all.




Both authors have already eclipsed the sales of the current comic big names. It's just Diamond has that monopoly and no one wants to change shit.
 
May 24, 2019
592
If I’m not mistaken DC Kids is in the scholastic system
I could be wrong, but I took from the cover of Superman Smashes the Klan posted a few pages ago, with it's price and number badge, that they're taking them from OGNs to a traditional floppy miniseries, then trade.
Sure, the schools and libraries could just get the trades, but something seems lost in not going with that original specific focus.

edit: Looking at it again, it says $9.99, so that's probably the complete GN's story, but it's weird that they're presenting it like a floppy comic. I wonder how it'll appear physically.
 

mreddie

Member
Oct 26, 2017
11,204

kmfdmpig

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
2,997
Can I safely skip this 3 part Josh Trank interview on Fatman on Batman?
It was hilarious to hear in real time as there was a pot of excitement over the film and they talked about Trank coming back soon to talk about future plans. Then BAM Trank's career was hit by a tranq.
In terms of comics having a barrier to entry - I think it's true that some are intimidated and confused.
I also think it's true they don't need to be. The industry could do a better job of reassuring potential readers that it's ok to jump in wherever and that they may miss some context, but will still be able to follow the basic plot and enjoy themselves.
 
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VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,097
You know what got me into comics? The little 10 page prologue comic that came with the Arkham Knight Collector's Edition, lol. Never cared about comics at all for the first 27 years of my life and then some random little comic I got with a video game turned it into this massive collection.
 

GringoSuave89

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
2,234
ABQ, NM
You know what got me into comics? The little 10 page prologue comic that came with the Arkham Knight Collector's Edition, lol. Never cared about comics at all for the first 27 years of my life and then some random little comic I got with a video game turned it into this massive collection.
I have that issue somewhere. Hey, whatever gets you in the door!
 

kmfdmpig

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
2,997
You know what got me into comics? The little 10 page prologue comic that came with the Arkham Knight Collector's Edition, lol. Never cared about comics at all for the first 27 years of my life and then some random little comic I got with a video game turned it into this massive collection.
Ironic that a major omnibus collector started with a 10 page issue. That's cool.
 

Freezasaurus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
20,154
Dystopian America
You know what got me into comics? The little 10 page prologue comic that came with the Arkham Knight Collector's Edition, lol. Never cared about comics at all for the first 27 years of my life and then some random little comic I got with a video game turned it into this massive collection.
I read them casually when I was a kid, but it mostly revolved around going to the comic shop with my dad and picking out whichever books had the shiniest embossed covers. Gimmick stuff like Wolverine #50 and the hologram covers of the X-Men Fatal Attractions story always got my attention. I wasn't nearly so into comics until about a decade ago, when after 15 years or so being out of the hobby, I casually picked up a copy of the Planet Hulk hardcover because it looked pretty neat.
 

VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,097
I have that issue somewhere. Hey, whatever gets you in the door!
Ironic that a major omnibus collector started with a 10 page issue. That's cool.
And I didn't really find comics intimidating. I think we as knowledgeable people think of the constant restarts and stuff as confusing for newcomers, but for me it wasn't, because I didn't know there were a bunch of relaunches. I first bought a Green Arrow trade that was called Year One, because I liked the Arrow show and it seemed to be an origin story, and really enjoyed it, so then I bought some Volume 1s of New 52 characters or teams I had heard of or that sounded/looked cool, and enjoyed those for the most part, too. It's only as you read more and more than you realize how often continuity changes and relaunches happen.

I read them casually when I was a kid, but it mostly revolved around going to the comic shop with my dad and picking out whichever books had the shiniest embossed covers. Gimmick stuff like Wolverine #50 and the hologram covers of the X-Men Fatal Attractions story always got my attention. I wasn't nearly so into comics until about a decade ago, when after 15 years or so being out of the hobby, I casually picked up a copy of the Planet Hulk hardcover because it looked pretty neat.
My dad actually used to buy a decent amount of comic issues in the 90s (he used to collect them as a kid but he got into buying #1s during the Death of Superman craze) and I would go with him, but even then I just didn't care at all. I would watch a lot of comic movies and - shortly before I started reading comics - watch the CW shows, but that was the extent of my desire. It's weird actually, because I never really THOUGHT about the fact that comics existed even while watching all of those movies and shows through the years. It never occurred to me that this stuff was often based on stories from the comics.
 
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GringoSuave89

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
2,234
ABQ, NM
I think the hurdle is just jumping in. Yeah there is all this history but by and large most stories are fairly self contained. If you ever want to give yourself a history lesson those comics are still there.

That said dont be a dummy like me and start with Morrison Batman. Shit was a trip.
 

Vic_Viper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,860
This Banshee show is too much sometimes. It is great though. Just saw this girl get her throat ripped out of her neck lol.
 

sackboy97

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,456
Italy
It's a variation on the character that works for the story Raimi and friends are trying to tell. It's an extremely silver age take imo, except instead of the anger and frustration you get the much more palatable meek nerdiness. I understand that people don't think he's a great version of the character, but I do think that opinions like "it's not a Spider-Man movie" are wack. These are the same people that probably bend over backwards to defend every single change they made to the MCU version. Iirc even Feige himself thinks Spider-Man 2 was a great film (he's actually a producer on it) and stated that he hoped to surpass it with the MCU's Spider-Man films.

Spider-Verse's Peter B. Parker is the best big screen version of the character tbh
That's fair, I do agree that the movies as a whole (the first two at least) are quite good. I think my issue might be that a lot of people now believe that the way he was portrayed in the Raimi trilogy is the way the character actually is, which I find quite annoying. A small example would be how people now think that Peter is supposed to not be good looking (which comes up often when talking about Garfield), when that's not really the case at all in the comics. Similarly, a lot of people complain about the car thief scene in ASM, which I feel is one of the closest one to the spirit of the comics.
 

El D

Member
Sep 20, 2018
1,493
If I’m not mistaken DC Kids is in the scholastic system
Not just that but I think there were some Scholastic-exclusive books by Nguyen/Fridolfs and a few others.

I give DC credit for trying to go outside of Diamond and comic shops on a more consistent basis. They led the way on going day-one digital with stuff and I've seen a few kids with the Walmart books.

Spider-Verse's Peter B. Parker is the best big screen version of the character tbh
Middle-aged, depressed, probably-suicidal, sardonic Peter Parker is the hero we need.
 

No Depth

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,943
I'm replying to this again because I think it's important to clarify something about the decline of print comics in the US. The peak of the industry was the early 90s- 1991, 1992, or thereabouts. A lot of blame is placed on the industry catering to speculators and collectors over longtime fans and flooding the market with #1s nobody wanted, expensive hologram covers, etc. By the end of the decade the entire industry suffered a massive collapse and Marvel themselves was near bankrupt. There's SOME truth to this, but the primary cause of the industry collapse isn't "too many speculators" it's a distribution war that Marvel Started.

In 1994, looking to squeeze even more money out of the market than they already had as well as solve some self inflicted issues with debt, Marvel bought the third largest distributor of comics in the US, "Heroes World Distribution" to act as their exclusive distributor of all comic book content. Diamond and Capital City were #1 and #2. This was disastrous for a few reasons:



There were about ten distributors in existence when Marvel bought Heroes World. All of them saw their overall sales drop by up to 40%, but not their costs. Marvel going exclusive meant that virtually all of them were going to go out of business, and Diamond began making aggressive deals to exclusively distribute other non-marvel comic books that Capital City and the others could not match. Capital City made some exclusive deals with a few smaller labels, but this only had the effect of putting those labels out of business.

the other big reason was that Heroes World was a small distributor that in NO WAY was prepared to take on the volume of exclusively distributing the massive chunk of the market that Marvel represented:



Heroes World struggled through 1995 and 1996, before being driven out of existence by lawsuits in 1997 as Marvel returned to Diamond, now the only player left in the print comics industry. Those outlets that weren't forced to close by Heroes World massively screwing up for years found themselves in a TERRIBLE position as Diamond's monopoly meant that costs were now far higher than they had been during the era when distribution was competitive. Making things worse, a viable competitor to Diamond isn't possible- as a "no resale" exclusive clause between Diamond and DC prevents a viable competitor from ever arising. Smaller shops were driven out of business totally by the new Monopoly diamond had, and by the end of the decade nearly 90% of local comic book stores had closed.

There are other smaller issues (Marvel was in a precarious position with a lot of debt and made some bad purchases on top of this) but THAT is the big reason why floppy sales are nowhere near their pre-crash levels, and CAN'T return to their pre-crash levels. A new system needs to be established that doesn't rely on the existing distribution network of Diamond to LCS.
Holy shit.
 

No Depth

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,943
I read them casually when I was a kid, but it mostly revolved around going to the comic shop with my dad and picking out whichever books had the shiniest embossed covers. Gimmick stuff like Wolverine #50 and the hologram covers of the X-Men Fatal Attractions story always got my attention. I wasn't nearly so into comics until about a decade ago, when after 15 years or so being out of the hobby, I casually picked up a copy of the Planet Hulk hardcover because it looked pretty neat.
This was kind of like me. Got sucked into Knightfall, Death of Supes, and Fatal Attractions as a kid in the early 90’s and then didn’t touch comics for years. Every now and again I’d read a trade I’d borrow from someone like Y the Last Man or Killing Joke because it sounded neat or I heard a recent movie took inspiration.

Then just a few years ago I went to a shop with a friend for the first time in a couple decades. Snagged Saga tpb 1 because it was the latest from the Y the Last Man guy and I think Injustice because I heard on GAF(before split) it was better than the game and was curious. Read both loved both, wanted more.

Then the insane Amazon Marvel digital sales happened and this community got me to buy, research, and discover a ton of Marvel recommendations. Then I discovered IST and Omni’s.

Now I have a disease.
 

Sou Da

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,822
That's fair, I do agree that the movies as a whole (the first two at least) are quite good. I think my issue might be that a lot of people now believe that the way he was portrayed in the Raimi trilogy is the way the character actually is, which I find quite annoying. A small example would be how people now think that Peter is supposed to not be good looking (which comes up often when talking about Garfield), when that's not really the case at all in the comics. Similarly, a lot of people complain about the car thief scene in ASM, which I feel is one of the closest one to the spirit of the comics.
I maintain that Raimi's Peter was a born victim and his MJ was downright unlikable.
 

Hellers

Member
Oct 27, 2017
419
I'm 46 and I started reading comics very young (Probably about 4 years old) with my parents buying me the Beano (Hi from the UK). I quickly graduated to whatever DC/Marvel was on the spinner at my local newsagents so my childhood was mostly random DC and Marvel issues. I have fond memories of specific issues but often would never see the resolution of the stories :) It's only in recent years with the availability of digital that I've been able to finish those issues.

Key thing is though that it never bothered me. The comics themselves were amazing enough.

Other things I ended up reading and loving was the juganaught that is 2000ad and a weird little monthly anthology called Starblazer. Starblazer was the sci-fi equivalent of Commando and I miss it terribly. I remember being on holiday in Blackpool with my parents for a week and every morning first thing my dad would take me to a newsagents just down the road from the B&B and buy me a couple of issues of Starblazer.


Two things I wish they'd reprint are Starblazer and the Beano. I think there's a huge market in particular for the Beano. Do it in "decades" volumes like they did with Peanuts. Sure it'd take more volumes but I reckon they'd sell bucket loads.

These days we can buy pretty much whatever we like. Especially if you've gone digital. Before I went on holiday a few months ago I bought every issue of the Five Years Later run of LSH on Comixology. Quite expensive but I don't regret it a bit.
 

Ross62

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,175
I could be wrong, but I took from the cover of Superman Smashes the Klan posted a few pages ago, with it's price and number badge, that they're taking them from OGNs to a traditional floppy miniseries, then trade.
Sure, the schools and libraries could just get the trades, but something seems lost in not going with that original specific focus.

edit: Looking at it again, it says $9.99, so that's probably the complete GN's story, but it's weird that they're presenting it like a floppy comic. I wonder how it'll appear physically.
Weirdly enough I think Superman Smashes the Klan is the only one to follow this format. Everything else is an OGN.