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COMICS!!! |OT| November 2019 | Ew, I don't want to read the content. I just wanna see the, you know ... stuff!

Vic_Viper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,987
My first job was at a bicycle shop in Ohio, and the owner was an actual furry. Thats actually how i found out what a furry was lol. Not kink shaming or anything, it just opened my eyes into other lifestyles.

EDIT: I was like 14 or 15 at the time
EDIT2: That also where I learned that POW MIA wasnt a biker gang symbol lol. I was.. a sheltered kid.
 
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Freezasaurus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
25,174
My first job was at a bicycle shop in Ohio, and the owner was an actual furry. Thats actually how i found out what a furry was lol. Not kink shaming or anything, it just opened my eyes into other lifestyles.

EDIT: I was like 14 or 15 at the time
Did you just show up for an interview and meet a man in a fursuit?
 

VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,952
SO, Planetary. I wrapped it up yesterday and I'm genuinely content with how it ended. A nice change from how comics typically leave me either unsettled or disappointed that there isn't more. But Planetary ended on a high point and ended well. One of those, "You can be happy for these people, given how everything worked out," kind of deals. And yeah, it also made me feel a little bit better about everything in a broader way, too.

I have two takeaways for Planetary, because I feel like Planetary is rather two different types of experiences. Both are excellent, and both work well off of each other. The first is that Planetary is in many ways much like The Authority. It's an Ellis superhero book, in which his character deal with a more grounded view of superheroes and more worldly, political perspectives clashing. The second is how Planetary is a more focused dissection of comic characters and figures from literature. I'm not going to pretend I picked up who every character referenced, or the nuance of each reference, but what I did pick up was excellent.

Let's start with the second point. I absolutely loved these every single one of these references, but a few really stood out. In issue #2, we get our first obvious introduction to what Planetary is about. We go to Island Zero, a land littered with the remains of dead Kaiju. There's so much to unpack here. It's a great message -- that there's more to this world than we understand. But also a melancholy message, in that everything is fragile. Humanity can do awful things, like create the atomic bomb, and in doing so create wonderful things, like the kaiju, and yet have them go extinct without even realizing they existed. That last line, with Jakita saying "Isn't that great?" when a child of the Kaiju flies overhead, defines a major message through the rest of the series. Embrace the strange, be it terrifying, be it unexplained, be it absurd.

There are several examples to follow that hammer in the idea of Planetary exploring reflections of "other worlds," touching on them through the lens of Ellis' personal views. But none provides as great an example of this as Ellis' love letter to Vertigo in issue #7. It helps so much that I know so many of the characters introduced in #7. Not just because it's so cool to see these characters through a new lens, but because of how something else becomes clear. This isn't just Ellis having fun with reflections of characters, this is Ellis' personal views of these characters brought to life. Would a lot of people really attend Constantine's funeral? In Ellis' world they would, because for Ellis the Vertigo universe revolved around Constantine. The transformation of Constantine into Spider from Transmet was especially poignant. Such a tribute to Jamie Delano, Garth Ennis, and Paul Jenkins. (of course, it could just be tooting his own horn after his own Hellblazer run, but I doubt it)

One thing that left me curious is just how big of a role the Fantastic Four played in the story. Planetary's war against the Four lasts the vast majority of the series (which is perhaps my one criticism, as I'd have loved for Ellis to explore more), and in doing so made clear just how much he hates the Four -- both the characters and how much they represent. And so the second half of the book is quite literally one message, drawn out -- Planetary isn't just a statement about the world, politics, and how comics fit into it. Planetary is a condemnation of the superhero comic status quo, and particularly Marvel's role in creating it. Ellis wants doesn't just want the world to be weird, he wants comics to be weird. And he sees the Fantastic Four as a symbol of how Marvel help hold that strangeness back. And so he tortures, exiles (Ben's cool, so he doesn't die), and murders the Four and the idea they represent.

I feel like I could write 2000 words regarding how the team of Planetary symbolizes so much of these ideas -- Elijah Snow's purpose being to "save" things, like comics, Jakita being born of two contradictory views of comic Africa (Wakanda + Tarzan) and being exiled, and The Drummer, the walking avatar of information and science and detail (while also being a walking macguffin). It's all so awesome and so well done and such a look into the mind of Ellis.

Back to that first point. I've gone over what Planetary is about and why I love it, but I think it's also worth mentioning how the story is told. I really adored Ellis' run on The Authority, but the one thing that keeps it from really achieving greatness is how it's structured as a story. It starts in a completely different series, Stormwatch, dramatically revamps itself at the start of The Authority, tells four 3-issue stories and then switches to a new author without acknowledgment. Those 12 issues are great, but ugh, what a frustrating and oh-so-comic-book waste of an opportunity.

Planetary doesn't waste its chance. It has a beginning, a middle, an end, and oh what an end. Instead of just killing the 4, the big bad, and calling it a day, Planetary keeps going, because there's more to do. The Planetary crew saves Ambros Chase, and in doing so delivers a message -- this is the end of this comic, but this is only the beginning of the ideas we embody. That page with all of the portals is so good. Whether it's a message about comic books, about politics, about the nature of the world, it's less important than the hopefully feeling it leaves in you. Elijah Snow saves things. What do folk think he truly saves as Planetary ends? With all of those portals open and all of those Planetary groups staring as if at the reader?

So yeah, I loved Planetary. I don't have a list of my favorite stories or omnibi or anything, but Planetary is up there. It's without a doubt my favorite Ellis story. It represents Ellis as a person so well, like say The Sandman does for Gaiman. It's great.
Great write-up. Really enjoyed reading it.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,157
Great write-up. Really enjoyed reading it.
Thanks, VanWinkle! And thanks to everyone who has recommended Planetary. And Porl for encouraging me to do a write-up. Looking back I don't think I would have gotten around to it for a long time if I hadn't had a bunch of folk encourage me to pick up The Authority omnibus when it came out a while back.
 

VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,952
Thanks, VanWinkle! And thanks to everyone who has recommended Planetary. And Porl for encouraging me to do a write-up. Looking back I don't think I would have gotten around to it for a long time if I hadn't had a bunch of folk encourage me to pick up The Authority omnibus when it came out a while back.
Whoops. I told you not to get the Authority omni because I thought only the Ellis stuff was worth reading. Glad you went ahead and got it anyway, lol.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,157
Whoops. I told you not to get the Authority omni because I thought only the Ellis stuff was worth reading. Glad you went ahead and got it anyway, lol.
hahah, well you did highly recommend ellis' run tho, which is why i did end up getting -- even knowing millar's stuff wasn't going to be too great.
 

Ahsoka

Member
Oct 20, 2019
564
Thanks, VanWinkle! And thanks to everyone who has recommended Planetary. And Porl for encouraging me to do a write-up. Looking back I don't think I would have gotten around to it for a long time if I hadn't had a bunch of folk encourage me to pick up The Authority omnibus when it came out a while back.
I haven’t read your post yet, because it’s been so long since I read Planetary that it could be spoiled again. But I’ll go back to this when I re-read that series.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,157
I haven’t read your post yet, because it’s been so long since I read Planetary that it could be spoiled again. But I’ll go back to this when I re-read that series.
all good! hey, i was thinking of reading some star wars soon. do you have any you'd recommend above others?
 
OP
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Messi

Messi

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,435
Read Dr Stone Vol 1 today. That was better than the anime imo. The art is spectacular.
 

Pachimari

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,942
So I'm looking at the current Annihilation sale on Comixology, and I'm thinking, is all I need Annihilation Book One, Two and Three? Is anything else essential? I'm thinking of getting Nova: Annihilation Conquest and Annihilation Conquest: Book One and Two as well which happens after the main event I've read. Are Annihilators, Annihilator: Earthfall and Guardians of the Galaxy also just as important or can that be skipped?
 

Freezasaurus

Member
Oct 25, 2017
25,174
So I'm looking at the current Annihilation sale on Comixology, and I'm thinking, is all I need Annihilation Book One, Two and Three? Is anything else essential? I'm thinking of getting Nova: Annihilation Conquest and Annihilation Conquest: Book One and Two as well which happens after the main event I've read. Are Annihilators, Annihilator: Earthfall and Guardians of the Galaxy also just as important or can that be skipped?
Annihilation Conquest was a separate event. A sequel to the first. But that's mainly all you need.
 

hipsterpants

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,706
Morrison wrote a ton of minis for Vertigo over the years, huh.

Think my new plan is going to be finish Animal Man -> Doom Patrol -> Seven Soldiers reread -> Final Crisis then I'll dice into those.

Only Morrison work I can't read is going to be his Flash because I want to get through Waid's run after that, so maybe that'll be my highest priority after going full Morrison.
 

whatsinaname

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,861
I also love how quickly the Hulk trades are coming out. One of the few positive of the 5 issue trade cadence. Dec 3rd and we are already at #25.
 

Ahsoka

Member
Oct 20, 2019
564
all good! hey, i was thinking of reading some star wars soon. do you have any you'd recommend above others?
Keep in mind that I’ve only read a single run from the Dark Horse era.

But the first thing I would recommend is the Dark Horse series I read, which is the 18-issue 2013 volume of Star Wars: Legacy by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman.

Second would be the opening six-issue arc of the 2015 flagship Star Wars series. It’s Jason Aaron and John Cassaday delivering the closest thing to the feel of watching an original trilogy movie as I think is possible in the comics medium. There’s more good throughout that series, but it gets to be pretty uneven, and even actively bad on the art side of things. If you just want a taste, get those first six issues.

This is going to sound like a joke, but that C-3PO one-shot, which was sold on the promise of revealing how he got his red arm, is a must-read. Not because it explains the arm, because who fucking cares, but because it’s just a really emotionally satisfying dose of great comics. Fans of Starman often wonder why Robinson fails so often to live up to that legacy, but I actually think you get a glimpse of who he used to be in a goddamn C-3PO one-shot of all things.

Doctor Aphra is one of the big highlights of the modern Marvel era of Star Wars, but you’re really going to want to read Gillen’s Vader run before it. It’s worth that investment, though.

Then I actually like Soule’s Vader series more than Gillen’s. Soule is just good at Star Wars. What’s great about his series is that it gets into cool lore stuff you’ve probably wondered about, while also having this weird flavor that feels slightly “off” in a really positive way. And I know I praised that opening arc of Aaron’s for feeling just like a movie, but this is proof that doing the opposite can have great results as well.
 

Astro Cat

Member
Mar 29, 2019
345
Morrison wrote a ton of minis for Vertigo over the years, huh.

Think my new plan is going to be finish Animal Man -> Doom Patrol -> Seven Soldiers reread -> Final Crisis then I'll dice into those.

Only Morrison work I can't read is going to be his Flash because I want to get through Waid's run after that, so maybe that'll be my highest priority after going full Morrison.
This is a good list. I've read almost all Morrison stuff at this point. Animal Man, Doom Patrol, and Final Crisis are great. I love how all of his DC books are one huge story.
cruchy cheetos are so much better than the puffy ones
Oh yeah. Cheese Balls that aren't Planters suck. I'm all about those Flamin' Hot Chipotle Ranch Cheetos.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,157
Keep in mind that I’ve only read a single run from the Dark Horse era.

But the first thing I would recommend is the Dark Horse series I read, which is the 18-issue 2013 volume of Star Wars: Legacy by Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman.

Second would be the opening six-issue arc of the 2015 flagship Star Wars series. It’s Jason Aaron and John Cassaday delivering the closest thing to the feel of watching an original trilogy movie as I think is possible in the comics medium. There’s more good throughout that series, but it gets to be pretty uneven, and even actively bad on the art side of things. If you just want a taste, get those first six issues.

This is going to sound like a joke, but that C-3PO one-shot, which was sold on the promise of revealing how he got his red arm, is a must-read. Not because it explains the arm, because who fucking cares, but because it’s just a really emotionally satisfying dose of great comics. Fans of Starman often wonder why Robinson fails so often to live up to that legacy, but I actually think you get a glimpse of who he used to be in a goddamn C-3PO one-shot of all things.

Doctor Aphra is one of the big highlights of the modern Marvel era of Star Wars, but you’re really going to want to read Gillen’s Vader run before it. It’s worth that investment, though.

Then I actually like Soule’s Vader series more than Gillen’s. Soule is just good at Star Wars. What’s great about his series is that it gets into cool lore stuff you’ve probably wondered about, while also having this weird flavor that feels slightly “off” in a really positive way. And I know I praised that opening arc of Aaron’s for feeling just like a movie, but this is proof that doing the opposite can have great results as well.
awesome. thanks so much! this is exactly what i was hoping for.
 

VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,952
Morrison wrote a ton of minis for Vertigo over the years, huh.

Think my new plan is going to be finish Animal Man -> Doom Patrol -> Seven Soldiers reread -> Final Crisis then I'll dice into those.

Only Morrison work I can't read is going to be his Flash because I want to get through Waid's run after that, so maybe that'll be my highest priority after going full Morrison.
Please read Multiversity after Final Crisis.
 

VanWinkle

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,952
Anybody else here have this book? Absolutely fascinating. Very real, open interviews with some classic comic writers back in the 70s and 80s. Some great insight into the process and the industry at the time.

Highly recommended for anybody interested in comics history.


 

hipsterpants

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,706
Looking up things and apparently Warren Ellis and Rick Remender were 2/3 writers on Dead Space? The more you know.