• The GiftBot 2.0 Launch Giveaway Extravaganza has come to a close with an astounding 8073 games given away to the community by 696 members, a huge success thanks to you! The gifting now continues with more official prizes in the new Gaming Giveaways |OT|. Leftover Steam codes are also being given away to the PC Gaming Era community.

COMICS!!! |OT| November 2019 | Ew, I don't want to read the content. I just wanna see the, you know ... stuff!

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,185
Just did a quick readthrough of Luther Strode, as I'd just picked up the complete collection hardcover. It's staggering how far Tradd Moore came between the three books. From an interesting, capable artist to someone with obvious talent. I'd say the third series, the Legacy of Luther Strode, is the only one that's genuinely great. The first is definitely intriguing. The second is just a mess. But the third, with Strode's pursuit of pacifism, his mantra of being better, that's some good shit, and it works really well in the modern discourse. I still don't understand the necessity of Petra, who retains that view of kill first, ask questions later. She constantly instigated fights Strode clearly didn't want. But in that it also allowed Strode to display just how much he cared for her, and through her the world, despite how broken they might be. How willing Strode was to protect it all, despite. She just wasn't depicted that way, really. More a comic relief, which is a shame.

But really, as good as it was they explored some more mature themes in Legacy, it's great purely because of Tradd Moore's art. Just... holy shit. I'm not a fan of violence, especially extreme violence, whatsoever. But Moore ability to capture motion and impact with incredibly smooth linework and interesting shapes -- it's just beautiful. One of the best drawers in the comics business right now.

And of course, Silver Surfer Black could never have happened without that progress.

Has anyone read The New World with Moore's art? It slipped right past me and I don't really know anything about it.
 

Ahsoka

Member
Oct 20, 2019
597
Freeza must be playing Death Stranding right now. Anyone know how long boredom-induced comas usually last, so we can estimate when he might return to the thread?
 

BKatastrophe

Member
Oct 28, 2017
6,493
Such an underrated book
The book that has gotten regular praise in this community since it started? Yeah super underrated.
It also occurred to me that Cassandra is like DCs Laura. I don’t know if there is more to that than coincidence.
There's nothing more except the "bred to be a living weapon" trope to them. Ethnicity, power set, origins, etc. are all different otherwise. In fact their debuts are 5 years apart (laura in 2004 and Cass in 1999).
 

Aizō

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
6,951
ほぼ真ん中の方
And Japanese mascots may well be the cutest thing that ever happened.

Well played.
Here's the mascot from one of the cities in Japan I lived in (Shimonoseki).

And one from another place I lived in (Shimane).


I just had a startling epiphany which may have ruined my night. Yurukyara—these mascots—are usually furries... their look doesn't really creep me out like the typical furry suit, though.
 

Dalek

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,596
Has it ever been explained how the Crime Syndicate and Earth 3 came back into being? I see them in a panel in this a Year of the Villian issue.
 

TropicalFish

Member
Oct 25, 2017
453
Scott Snyder does not write Hawkgirl well.

Actually, I don't think many people wrote her well besides John Ostrander, but that was Hawkwoman.

Why is it so difficult to transfer her brilliant DCAU portrayal over to the comics medium?
 

TheMadTitan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,007
Scott Snyder does not write Hawkgirl well.

Actually, I don't think many people wrote her well besides John Ostrander, but that was Hawkwoman.

Why is it so difficult to transfer her brilliant DCAU portrayal over to the comics medium?
Her entire purpose this arc is to be the vessel for the Phoenix Force. Which is fine, but yeah, DCAU Hawkgirl should be the go to, and with a lineup inspired by the DCAU, he should've just copy/pasted her.
 

Porl

Member
Nov 6, 2017
5,120
Spain
SO, Planetary. I wrapped it up yesterday and I'm genuinely content with how it ended. A nice change from how comics typically leave me either unsettled or disappointed that there isn't more. But Planetary ended on a high point and ended well. One of those, "You can be happy for these people, given how everything worked out," kind of deals. And yeah, it also made me feel a little bit better about everything in a broader way, too.

I have two takeaways for Planetary, because I feel like Planetary is rather two different types of experiences. Both are excellent, and both work well off of each other. The first is that Planetary is in many ways much like The Authority. It's an Ellis superhero book, in which his character deal with a more grounded view of superheroes and more worldly, political perspectives clashing. The second is how Planetary is a more focused dissection of comic characters and figures from literature. I'm not going to pretend I picked up who every character referenced, or the nuance of each reference, but what I did pick up was excellent.

Let's start with the second point. I absolutely loved these every single one of these references, but a few really stood out. In issue #2, we get our first obvious introduction to what Planetary is about. We go to Island Zero, a land littered with the remains of dead Kaiju. There's so much to unpack here. It's a great message -- that there's more to this world than we understand. But also a melancholy message, in that everything is fragile. Humanity can do awful things, like create the atomic bomb, and in doing so create wonderful things, like the kaiju, and yet have them go extinct without even realizing they existed. That last line, with Jakita saying "Isn't that great?" when a child of the Kaiju flies overhead, defines a major message through the rest of the series. Embrace the strange, be it terrifying, be it unexplained, be it absurd.

There are several examples to follow that hammer in the idea of Planetary exploring reflections of "other worlds," touching on them through the lens of Ellis' personal views. But none provides as great an example of this as Ellis' love letter to Vertigo in issue #7. It helps so much that I know so many of the characters introduced in #7. Not just because it's so cool to see these characters through a new lens, but because of how something else becomes clear. This isn't just Ellis having fun with reflections of characters, this is Ellis' personal views of these characters brought to life. Would a lot of people really attend Constantine's funeral? In Ellis' world they would, because for Ellis the Vertigo universe revolved around Constantine. The transformation of Constantine into Spider from Transmet was especially poignant. Such a tribute to Jamie Delano, Garth Ennis, and Paul Jenkins. (of course, it could just be tooting his own horn after his own Hellblazer run, but I doubt it)

One thing that left me curious is just how big of a role the Fantastic Four played in the story. Planetary's war against the Four lasts the vast majority of the series (which is perhaps my one criticism, as I'd have loved for Ellis to explore more), and in doing so made clear just how much he hates the Four -- both the characters and how much they represent. And so the second half of the book is quite literally one message, drawn out -- Planetary isn't just a statement about the world, politics, and how comics fit into it. Planetary is a condemnation of the superhero comic status quo, and particularly Marvel's role in creating it. Ellis wants doesn't just want the world to be weird, he wants comics to be weird. And he sees the Fantastic Four as a symbol of how Marvel help hold that strangeness back. And so he tortures, exiles (Ben's cool, so he doesn't die), and murders the Four and the idea they represent.

I feel like I could write 2000 words regarding how the team of Planetary symbolizes so much of these ideas -- Elijah Snow's purpose being to "save" things, like comics, Jakita being born of two contradictory views of comic Africa (Wakanda + Tarzan) and being exiled, and The Drummer, the walking avatar of information and science and detail (while also being a walking macguffin). It's all so awesome and so well done and such a look into the mind of Ellis.

Back to that first point. I've gone over what Planetary is about and why I love it, but I think it's also worth mentioning how the story is told. I really adored Ellis' run on The Authority, but the one thing that keeps it from really achieving greatness is how it's structured as a story. It starts in a completely different series, Stormwatch, dramatically revamps itself at the start of The Authority, tells four 3-issue stories and then switches to a new author without acknowledgment. Those 12 issues are great, but ugh, what a frustrating and oh-so-comic-book waste of an opportunity.

Planetary doesn't waste its chance. It has a beginning, a middle, an end, and oh what an end. Instead of just killing the 4, the big bad, and calling it a day, Planetary keeps going, because there's more to do. The Planetary crew saves Ambros Chase, and in doing so delivers a message -- this is the end of this comic, but this is only the beginning of the ideas we embody. That page with all of the portals is so good. Whether it's a message about comic books, about politics, about the nature of the world, it's less important than the hopefully feeling it leaves in you. Elijah Snow saves things. What do folk think he truly saves as Planetary ends? With all of those portals open and all of those Planetary groups staring as if at the reader?

So yeah, I loved Planetary. I don't have a list of my favorite stories or omnibi or anything, but Planetary is up there. It's without a doubt my favorite Ellis story. It represents Ellis as a person so well, like say The Sandman does for Gaiman. It's great.
thank you for the write up. It was great.

Planetary is probably my favorite series. It's also my only omni. 🙂

Even leaving behind all the comics references and the meaning behind them, I just love the main theme of "look at this world, it's so wonderful and full of wonderful things we have yet to discover, and we gotta protect it from evil greedy rich men" The series is pretty damn sad and melancholic, while never losing sight of the wonder and discovery. Of the weirdness of the world. Even when they're fighting against the Four, they're still discovering new things every issue. My favorite two issues are definitely the ones where they use those angel aliens to visit that spaceship with the giant guy.

I also really like the emotional beats of the series, the character growth of all these people, and their reactions to all the horrible horrible stuff the Four did. And The Four do lots of dark shit, but to me it never felt like shock value, it was just, purely horrifying, and cold, and scary. "they killed a whole world just to store their weapons".

And all the pop culture references and homages are just... so much fun. You got dracula teaming up with sherlock holmes, Jules Verne actually trying to reach the moon, you got kaijus, vertigo comics, tarzan meeting wakanda, james bond, kung fu stuff, the wild west, and so much more that i don't remember or just simply didn't catch. It's just delightful

I know the Fantastic Four killing the Trinity and holding people back from technological advancement have some meaning, and reflect on Ellis' thoughts about comics, but honestly? I don't care. I love everything else about the book and im happy just taking these things at face value without looking for a deeper meaning.

What did you think about the crossovers? I remember not liking the JL one the first time i read it. The batman one is so fun tho
 

Porl

Member
Nov 6, 2017
5,120
Spain
For some reason I'm still pulling Deathstroke, because there's like 2 issues left and i might as well finish it, but the opening monologue in #49 is......... something..... considering what happened with Priest not long ago

"What makes a man a `Villain`? I thought I knew. But the higher your consciousness is elevated, the fewer answers you discover."
"Am I a good man? I always thought so. I tried to- wanted to be."

Come on dude lol
 
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KineAg62

Member
May 8, 2018
199
SO, Planetary. I wrapped it up yesterday and I'm genuinely content with how it ended. A nice change from how comics typically leave me either unsettled or disappointed that there isn't more. But Planetary ended on a high point and ended well. One of those, "You can be happy for these people, given how everything worked out," kind of deals. And yeah, it also made me feel a little bit better about everything in a broader way, too.

I have two takeaways for Planetary, because I feel like Planetary is rather two different types of experiences. Both are excellent, and both work well off of each other. The first is that Planetary is in many ways much like The Authority. It's an Ellis superhero book, in which his character deal with a more grounded view of superheroes and more worldly, political perspectives clashing. The second is how Planetary is a more focused dissection of comic characters and figures from literature. I'm not going to pretend I picked up who every character referenced, or the nuance of each reference, but what I did pick up was excellent.

Let's start with the second point. I absolutely loved these every single one of these references, but a few really stood out. In issue #2, we get our first obvious introduction to what Planetary is about. We go to Island Zero, a land littered with the remains of dead Kaiju. There's so much to unpack here. It's a great message -- that there's more to this world than we understand. But also a melancholy message, in that everything is fragile. Humanity can do awful things, like create the atomic bomb, and in doing so create wonderful things, like the kaiju, and yet have them go extinct without even realizing they existed. That last line, with Jakita saying "Isn't that great?" when a child of the Kaiju flies overhead, defines a major message through the rest of the series. Embrace the strange, be it terrifying, be it unexplained, be it absurd.

There are several examples to follow that hammer in the idea of Planetary exploring reflections of "other worlds," touching on them through the lens of Ellis' personal views. But none provides as great an example of this as Ellis' love letter to Vertigo in issue #7. It helps so much that I know so many of the characters introduced in #7. Not just because it's so cool to see these characters through a new lens, but because of how something else becomes clear. This isn't just Ellis having fun with reflections of characters, this is Ellis' personal views of these characters brought to life. Would a lot of people really attend Constantine's funeral? In Ellis' world they would, because for Ellis the Vertigo universe revolved around Constantine. The transformation of Constantine into Spider from Transmet was especially poignant. Such a tribute to Jamie Delano, Garth Ennis, and Paul Jenkins. (of course, it could just be tooting his own horn after his own Hellblazer run, but I doubt it)

One thing that left me curious is just how big of a role the Fantastic Four played in the story. Planetary's war against the Four lasts the vast majority of the series (which is perhaps my one criticism, as I'd have loved for Ellis to explore more), and in doing so made clear just how much he hates the Four -- both the characters and how much they represent. And so the second half of the book is quite literally one message, drawn out -- Planetary isn't just a statement about the world, politics, and how comics fit into it. Planetary is a condemnation of the superhero comic status quo, and particularly Marvel's role in creating it. Ellis wants doesn't just want the world to be weird, he wants comics to be weird. And he sees the Fantastic Four as a symbol of how Marvel help hold that strangeness back. And so he tortures, exiles (Ben's cool, so he doesn't die), and murders the Four and the idea they represent.

I feel like I could write 2000 words regarding how the team of Planetary symbolizes so much of these ideas -- Elijah Snow's purpose being to "save" things, like comics, Jakita being born of two contradictory views of comic Africa (Wakanda + Tarzan) and being exiled, and The Drummer, the walking avatar of information and science and detail (while also being a walking macguffin). It's all so awesome and so well done and such a look into the mind of Ellis.

Back to that first point. I've gone over what Planetary is about and why I love it, but I think it's also worth mentioning how the story is told. I really adored Ellis' run on The Authority, but the one thing that keeps it from really achieving greatness is how it's structured as a story. It starts in a completely different series, Stormwatch, dramatically revamps itself at the start of The Authority, tells four 3-issue stories and then switches to a new author without acknowledgment. Those 12 issues are great, but ugh, what a frustrating and oh-so-comic-book waste of an opportunity.

Planetary doesn't waste its chance. It has a beginning, a middle, an end, and oh what an end. Instead of just killing the 4, the big bad, and calling it a day, Planetary keeps going, because there's more to do. The Planetary crew saves Ambros Chase, and in doing so delivers a message -- this is the end of this comic, but this is only the beginning of the ideas we embody. That page with all of the portals is so good. Whether it's a message about comic books, about politics, about the nature of the world, it's less important than the hopefully feeling it leaves in you. Elijah Snow saves things. What do folk think he truly saves as Planetary ends? With all of those portals open and all of those Planetary groups staring as if at the reader?

So yeah, I loved Planetary. I don't have a list of my favorite stories or omnibi or anything, but Planetary is up there. It's without a doubt my favorite Ellis story. It represents Ellis as a person so well, like say The Sandman does for Gaiman. It's great.
Really enjoyed this write up. Thanks for sharing. I don't own many physical graphic novels after I donated most of them to my local library, but I keep shelf space for the books that really matter to me. Planetary will always have a place on my shelf. Ellis and Cassady work so perfectly together throughout the title. It's interesting, due to how long the series took to finish, to see the evolution of Ellis's writing and Cassaday's art. One of the best, complete series out there. I was gonna start up Death Stranding this weekend, but now I think I'm gonna get my Absolutes off the shelf, crack open some scotch, and recline in the optimal Absolute/Omni position for some sweet, sweet nostalgia.
 

Paradax

Member
Jun 1, 2018
201
Ah thanks just checked and you are correct, assumed cause vol 4 was part of the Morrison sale that he had written it. For some reason I always thought his run was longer which is why I hadn’t read it yet.
The stories in the fourth volume are pretty good too, albeit a different flavor than Morrison. Peter Milligan pushed the surrealism maybe even further than Morrison, whereas Tom Veitch shifted the series towards more conventional cape stories (setting up the character for the Delando and Lemire runs).
 

BKatastrophe

Member
Oct 28, 2017
6,493
Has it ever been explained how the Crime Syndicate and Earth 3 came back into being? I see them in a panel in this a Year of the Villian issue.
Nope. They’re back in Bendis’ Superman.
Scott Snyder does not write Hawkgirl well.

Actually, I don't think many people wrote her well besides John Ostrander, but that was Hawkwoman.

Why is it so difficult to transfer her brilliant DCAU portrayal over to the comics medium?
Kendra Saunders and Shayera Hol aren’t the same.
 

Ahsoka

Member
Oct 20, 2019
597
This isn’t cute, it’s terrifying.

Dogs aren't furries!!!!
It’s like...a reverse furry. That dog is dressing up like a person to fuck other dogs dressed like people.

Here's the mascot from one of the cities in Japan I lived in (Shimonoseki).

And one from another place I lived in (Shimane).


I just had a startling epiphany which may have ruined my night. Yurukyara—these mascots—are usually furries... their look doesn't really creep me out like the typical furry suit, though.
The blue one is adorable!!

These cinemas are so long. I just want to deliver packages!
If you open a package, does another movie pop out?
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,185
thank you for the write up. It was great.

Planetary is probably my favorite series. It's also my only omni. 🙂

Even leaving behind all the comics references and the meaning behind them, I just love the main theme of "look at this world, it's so wonderful and full of wonderful things we have yet to discover, and we gotta protect it from evil greedy rich men" The series is pretty damn sad and melancholic, while never losing sight of the wonder and discovery. Of the weirdness of the world. Even when they're fighting against the Four, they're still discovering new things every issue. My favorite two issues are definitely the ones where they use those angel aliens to visit that spaceship with the giant guy.

I also really like the emotional beats of the series, the character growth of all these people, and their reactions to all the horrible horrible stuff the Four did. And The Four do lots of dark shit, but to me it never felt like shock value, it was just, purely horrifying, and cold, and scary. "they killed a whole world just to store their weapons".

And all the pop culture references and homages are just... so much fun. You got dracula teaming up with sherlock holmes, Jules Verne actually trying to reach the moon, you got kaijus, vertigo comics, tarzan meeting wakanda, james bond, kung fu stuff, the wild west, and so much more that i don't remember or just simply didn't catch. It's just delightful

I know the Fantastic Four killing the Trinity and holding people back from technological advancement have some meaning, and reflect on Ellis' thoughts about comics, but honestly? I don't care. I love everything else about the book and im happy just taking these things at face value without looking for a deeper meaning.

What did you think about the crossovers? I remember not liking the JL one the first time i read it. The batman one is so fun tho
i'm a lover of layers, but i totally agree that the positive world outlook is the foundation of the book's greatness. same thing with the authority.

the batman one really is fun, and really does fit into planetary as if it were a regular issue. fun and weird and just disturbed enough to be a planetary issue and not a batman issue. the JLA one was super weird. i love the concept of alt-universe trinity fighting back against a corrupt planetary. funnily enough like the planetary/authority crossover where the villains were a corrupt authority. but it was otherwise very tonally off. especially killing "superman" by launching him into the void of space, while bats and wondy pat themselved on teh back for a job well done inside.
Really enjoyed this write up. Thanks for sharing. I don't own many physical graphic novels after I donated most of them to my local library, but I keep shelf space for the books that really matter to me. Planetary will always have a place on my shelf. Ellis and Cassady work so perfectly together throughout the title. It's interesting, due to how long the series took to finish, to see the evolution of Ellis's writing and Cassaday's art. One of the best, complete series out there. I was gonna start up Death Stranding this weekend, but now I think I'm gonna get my Absolutes off the shelf, crack open some scotch, and recline in the optimal Absolute/Omni position for some sweet, sweet nostalgia.
hell yes, why not both?
 

kmfdmpig

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,444
Speaking of Ellis - I'm finally getting around to reading Global Frequency and it's damn good.
 

Porl

Member
Nov 6, 2017
5,120
Spain
the JLA one was super weird. i love the concept of alt-universe trinity fighting back against a corrupt planetary. funnily enough like the planetary/authority crossover where the villains were a corrupt authority. but it was otherwise very tonally off. especially killing "superman" by launching him into the void of space, while bats and wondy pat themselved on teh back for a job well done inside.
Yeah, like, there was some cool stuff, but also it was a weird as fuck issue.

(Also at first, since the other 2 crossovers were in continuity i thought this one was too and this was the future and they were evil and boy, I did not like that)
 

Vic_Viper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,019
How was this week’s Justice League? I forgot it was even out this week lol. It looked like it focused on the Legion of Doom’s perspective.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,185
This also just got announced. Love CROM's style. Very Adventure Time. Very Jake Wyatt.

"Marken and Maron, inseparable brothers, are dungeon raiders in a land ruled by corrupt royals and filled with fantastic dangers around every turn. But just as the aging Marken decides that it’s time to give up the raiding life, both brothers find themselves at the wrong end of the powers that be and stumble upon a secret that may unravel the entire political system."

From Daniel Freedman (Undying Love) and CROM (Birdking), comes an original graphic novel about family, freedom, and killing monsters for loot in Raiders.



 
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Astro Cat

Member
Mar 29, 2019
358
I noticed CMX Unlimited has a bunch of Giant Days. I went ahead and got the 1st one and within 2-3 pages I was sold. It's too charming to resist. Definitely my kind of book.
 

shacklesmcgee

Member
Oct 25, 2017
255
I noticed CMX Unlimited has a bunch of Giant Days. I went ahead and got the 1st one and within 2-3 pages I was sold. It's too charming to resist. Definitely my kind of book.
One of us, Gooble gobble Gooble gobble
One of us, goob-
*Starts crying because it's over*

Like Mass Effect and Fringe, it's one of those things I wish I could forget all about, just so I could experience it for the first time again.
 

bluexy

Freelance Games Journalist
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
3,185

whatsinaname

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,893
Top comics for October:



Surprised Marauders is so low, tbh. Would have thought that X-Men fervor would have carried over better. Not to say #10 isn't solid. just... behind Ghost Rider #1? Behind Mary Jane? Hmm.

Wait, Hulk single issues are $6?!
 

Tyrant Rave

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,272
Top comics for October:



Surprised Marauders is so low, tbh. Would have thought that X-Men fervor would have carried over better. Not to say #10 isn't solid. just... behind Ghost Rider #1? Behind Mary Jane? Hmm.

Only one book at $3.99...

I miss $2.99
 

ElNarez

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,563
Top comics for October:



Surprised Marauders is so low, tbh. Would have thought that X-Men fervor would have carried over better. Not to say #10 isn't solid. just... behind Ghost Rider #1? Behind Mary Jane? Hmm.

Dollars is where it gets interesting because both Harleen and Criminal Sanity placed in the top 10. If the plan is to have 5G in the main line and the classic heroes in Black Label books, that would still make pretty good business for DC.
 

Astro Cat

Member
Mar 29, 2019
358
One of us, Gooble gobble Gooble gobble
One of us, goob-
*Starts crying because it's over*

Like Mass Effect and Fringe, it's one of those things I wish I could forget all about, just so I could experience it for the first time again.
There's something comforting about starting a finished book that stays solid throughout. For whatever reason I never thought the art was all that special but after the first issue, it's hard to think of anyone else being so perfect.

And I still need to finish Fringe. Think I stopped midway through season 3-4 but it was awesome, just fell off for some reason and it will require a total rewatch. Maybe skipping season 1 though lol.
 

Ahsoka

Member
Oct 20, 2019
597
The main character is an alcoholic. I don’t remember if he had a shitty father.

But I was actually just referring to the style of dialogue. Remender’s brand of crass is really distinct, and that game is packed with that stuff. Things like “dicktits”, “I’ll kill your dick”, “Waggleton P. Tallylicker”, etc.
 

hipsterpants

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,712
I was going to say Floprauders but temporarily forgot Excalibur existed when looking at that list

(Excalibur was a solid book)