Countries with the best quality of life in the world 2019 - US News Report

.Detective.

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,151
Beyond the essential ideas of broad access to food and housing, to quality education and health care, to employment that will sustain us, quality of life may also include intangibles such as job security, political stability, individual freedom and environmental quality.

What social scientists do agree on is that material wealth is not the most important factor in assessing a life lived well. The results of the Quality of Life sub-ranking survey reflect that sensibility.

The 2019 Best Countries rankings, formed in partnership with BAV Group, a unit of global marketing communications company VMLY&R, and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, are based on a study that surveyed more than 20,000 global citizens from four regions to assess perceptions of 80 countries on 75 different metrics. The Quality of Life subranking is based on an equally weighted average of scores from nine country attributes that relate to quality of life in a country: affordable, a good job market, economically stable, family friendly, income equality, politically stable, safe, well-developed public education system and well-developed public health system. The Quality of Life subranking score had a 17 percent weight in the overall Best Countries ranking.

People consistently view a small group of nations as best providing for their citizens. For the fourth consecutive year, Canada ranks No. 1 overall for providing a good quality of life. Survey respondents view the North American country as No. 1 for both being politically stable and having a well-developed public education system, and No. 2 for having a good job market, a perception supported by independent research. The North American country is seen as possessing the fifth best well-developed public health care system. In fact, Canada is rated in the top 10 in all but one of the nine attributes, affordability, where Asian countries dominate.

Seven European countries are ranked in the top 10, and 13 from the continent rank in the top 20. Sweden, Denmark and Norway immediately follow Canada, with Switzerland, Finland, Australia, the Netherlands, New Zealand and Germany also finishing in the top 10.

Countries perceived to provide a lower quality of life perform most poorly in areas concerning personal safety and economic opportunity. Iraq, followed by Iran, Lebanon, Jordan, and Angola are at the bottom of the quality of life ranking. Iraq finishes last in the survey for being friendly to families.

For the second year in a row, the United States ranks No. 17 overall by survey respondents for providing a good quality of life. Its highest ranking is for its job market, where it ranks first. Its lowest ranking came in affordability, where survey responses placed it No. 56.
The Top 10(of the 80 Nations In the Study):

1. Canada - No change for past 4 years
2. Sweden - Up 1 from # 3 in 2018
3. Denmark - Down 1 from # 2 in 2018
4. Norway - No change from 2018
5. Switzerland - Up 1 from # 6 in 2018
6. Finland - Up 1 from # 7 in 2018
7. Australia - Down 2 from # 5 in 2018
8. Netherlands - No change from 2018
9. New Zealand - No change from 2018
10. Germany - No change from 2018

 

Inuhanyou

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,299
New Jersey
Let's not learn something from those nordic democratic socialist countries about how they do things to perhaps improve our quality of life, we're America...the land of no we cant because our corporate overlords said so, so let's just get the media and the politicians to parrot that until people believe it.

:( Bringing up lists like this is always such a sad gutpunch
 

Master Of Illusion

Alt Account
Banned
Mar 18, 2019
856
Let's not learn something from those nordic democratic socialist countries about how they do things to improve our quality of life, we're America...the land of no we cant because our corporate overlords said so
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, so elevating the income tax rate to lets say 50% marginal over everyone making over $60,000 to pay for every "free" amenity Nordic countries have will lead to disastrous results.
 

Inuhanyou

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,299
New Jersey
Sorry, that was not the intention at all. My apologies.

Just wanted to share some positive news. And as a Canadian, it's something for us to be extremely proud of, but also knowing that we aren't fucking perfect by any means.
That's not positive news for those of us in the ditch...but it is something for Canada to be happy about. You guys have taken a lot of the better lessons from Europe and enacted them..and those on the progressive side of the spectrum here in USA are trying to follow after your coattails at the very least
 

Inuhanyou

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,299
New Jersey
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, so elevating the income tax rate to lets say 50% marginal over everyone making over $60,000 to pay for every "free" amenity Nordic countries have will lead to disastrous results.
I am wondering how you got to your logic in that statement versus what i said.

That is, that we can learn something from the nordic countries about how they do things to improve our quality of life.
 

saenima

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,077
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, so elevating the income tax rate to lets say 50% marginal over everyone making over $60,000 to pay for every "free" amenity Nordic countries have will lead to disastrous results.
Yeah you're gonna have to show some receipts on this one. I'm looking at a table that says otherwise. The cost of living in the US is lower than in all of the nordic countries.


Idk how accurate this is though.
 

KillerMan91

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,191
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, so elevating the income tax rate to lets say 50% marginal over everyone making over $60,000 to pay for every "free" amenity Nordic countries have will lead to disastrous results.
Goods costing 3x more compared to Nordic nations? Buahaha. Shit is expensive here (as it's taxed high). Starting from gasoline that basically costs 3x more than in US.
 

DazzlerIE

Member
Oct 25, 2017
698
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, so elevating the income tax rate to lets say 50% marginal over everyone making over $60,000 to pay for every "free" amenity Nordic countries have will lead to disastrous results.
lmao - have you been to europe? Pretty much everything is more expensive there. However, in a lot of countries you won't go broke if you fall ill, and you can get a degree without putting yourself in debt for life so it balances out
 

Kernel

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,061
Sorry, that was not the intention at all. My apologies.

Just wanted to share some positive news. And as a Canadian, it's something for us to be extremely proud of, but also knowing that we aren't fucking perfect by any means.
We have a ways to go. We will take one step forward if we implement pharmacare.

We are still plagued by similar problems as the US, just not as bad, yet we are importing the same bullshit rightwing rhetoric.

It feels like we are at a crossroads as a country this fall.

The theocons running with Scheer can't win.
 

Inuhanyou

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,299
New Jersey
lmao - have you been to europe? Pretty much everything is more expensive there. However, in a lot of countries you won't go broke if you fall ill, and you can get a degree without putting yourself in debt for life so it balances out
This is a good point. They have their general societal bullshit figured out, and so dont have to worry about basic things that America cant get right, like private industry in healthcare making bank on people's health, banks making a killing on people paying off student loans forever, ect
 
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.Detective.

.Detective.

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,151
That's not positive news for those of us in the ditch...but it is something for Canada to be happy about. You guys have taken a lot of the better lessons from Europe and enacted them..and those on the progressive side of the spectrum here in USA are trying to follow after your coattails at the very least
It's funny that you mention that. A lot of people in Canada believe our policies are often formed by looking at the world around us, seeing where there is success/previous studies for a base comparison done, and then straight up using something similar to a Sharingan eye from Naruto(I wanted to use a random anime reference since I noticed your username choice lol) to copy/assimilate and improve upon it(or maybe a Star Trek Borg reference might work, haha).

This is also mainly because Canada is a very young nation in comparison to the majority of countries of the world. Only 151 years of age. It also provides the added benefit that when we create something from scratch, which does occur, we don't have to deal with "legacy system/migration change" problems that some older countries have, to borrow an IT systems analogy.

In a way, it fits our patchwork/mosaic of peoples' multicultural theme.

There was actually an opinion piece in the local news about this the other day:

Canada’s wisest policy: stealing policies from other countries


We have a ways to go. We will take one step forward if we implement pharmacare.

We are still plagued by similar problems as the US, just not as bad, yet we are importing the same bullshit rightwing rhetoric.

It feels like we are at a crossroads as a country this fall.

The theocons running with Scheer can't win.
Definitely, 100% agreed.
 

Apathy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,418
The Top 10(of the 80 Nations In the Study):

1. Canada - No change for past 4 years
2. Sweden - Up 1 from # 3 in 2018
3. Denmark - Down 1 from # 2 in 2018
4. Norway - No change from 2018
5. Switzerland - Up 1 from # 6 in 2018
6. Finland - Up 1 from # 7 in 2018
7. Australia - Down 2 from # 5 in 2018
8. Netherlands - No change from 2018
9. New Zealand - No change from 2018
10. Germany - No change from 2018

4-peat. Canada continues to win. It's good to be at the top
 

Menx64

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,810
China is above my country in:

Citizenship
These are progressive, inclusive countries brimming with social capital...

Just how accurate those list are again???
 

Lulu

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,440
dead ass dating a swedish girl, should I bounce from here? (nyc). Honestly we talk about it from time to time.
 

genjiZERO

Member
Jan 27, 2019
539
Richmond
These things are really dumb. No one in their right mind would want to live in China over Belgium, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Ireland, or South Korea yet it's somehow a "better country" than those 6.
 

Addi

Member
Oct 25, 2017
923
Not sure I buy their overall best ranking with the US in 8th ahead of Norway. American cultural imperialism is a positive? Entrepreneurship gets it's own category, but safety is only one post under Quality of life? There's a post for a country's sexyness?
 

Jiminy

Avenger
Mar 29, 2018
2,543
Except the cost of rent and other goods in the US is 3X higher, .
That's comically incorrect. Buying a smallish block of cheese in say Sweden can cost like 20 bucks

These things are really dumb. No one in their right mind would want to live in China over Belgium, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Ireland, or South Korea yet it's somehow a "better country" than those 6.
As much as the west's perception of China is that it's an authoritarian dystopia, it's also got a billion people in it, and MANY of those people live a pretty decent unintruded life

But yeah you can tell the study is a bit arbitrary with its metrics, as all studies are
 

Dremorak

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,763
New Zealand
Why is Australia #7 and NZ #9 when we dont have an entire ecosystem revolving around things that will try and kill you?
(Spiders, Snakes, Dropbears, you name it)
 

ShadowAUS

Member
Feb 20, 2019
868
Australia
I'm surprised Australia hasn't fallen more to be honest, especially in the Citizenship category. Somehow we have high scores in "Cares about the environment". The rest I mostly agree with but I wonder which category Press Freedom and Government Surveillance would fall under as I would assume that should be falling as well.

Edit: The QoL ranking seems mostly sane though, I would argue the Job Market category is slightly misleading as so many young people just coming out of school are having an incredibly tough time finding work and it's been this way for a few years now.
 
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thewienke

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,575
That's a pretty accurate ranking for the US.

I always kinda grit my teeth with these international rankings that like to put the US down at like....57 to make a statement and generate buzz.
 

Frigid Eh

Member
Oct 28, 2017
82
Canada is pretty good. Whenever I travel I'm reminded that this is the only place I want to live.
 

Inuhanyou

Member
Oct 25, 2017
11,299
New Jersey
That's a pretty accurate ranking for the US.

I always kinda grit my teeth with these international rankings that like to put the US down at like....57 to make a statement and generate buzz.
if we're failing at many issues, its not a statement but a fact of how we are failing at many issues. You dont need to be mad at being told the truth
 

John198X

Member
Nov 9, 2018
205
Don’t all these countries understand their quality of life comes from wish list legislation and fairy tale economics?

People need to be realistic, here.
 
Mar 3, 2019
38
Im curious how well the scandanavian system would hold up once you put 350 million people in it, or say 1 billion people in it, if it still holds up or if there are any scales at which it starts to have issues. I envy scandanavian countries for their natural renewable resources though, makes it that much easier to have a clean healthy environment to live in
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,340
I'm not surprised in the least that most countries here have a population of less than 10 million. Australia and Canada being higher and Germany being the most populated. It's just so much easy to provide a good and stable life to a smaller, more homogeneous population compared to a diverse country of several hundred million or billion.

And what is a manageable problem for a nation of 6 million may be a complete and utter clusterfuck for a nation of 400 million.
 

ScopehJ

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,438
The UK went up from 13th to 12th?? Even though we’re currently a dysfunctional mess politically and economically.
 

Zabo

Member
Oct 30, 2017
624
China is above my country in:

Citizenship
These are progressive, inclusive countries brimming with social capital...

Just how accurate those list are again???
These are not accurate lists at all. Metrics used to evaluate quality of life or happiness are fairly fickle. Still, life is good in scandinavia, but can't wait to get out of my contract and move to germany or france.
 

Majora85

Member
Nov 21, 2017
456
Just been to Stockholm for a week and I can believe that Sweden ranking. Incredible public hospitals, reliable and modern public transport, spotless streets, polite and respectful people, beautiful environment, massive push on recycling. I genuinely felt quite depressed at the thought of returning to London at the end of my trip, it felt like everything a well-funded, fully functioning modern city should be and I didn't even just go to the rich/touristy areas either. And that's without even getting into their world-class social security systems.

It was very expensive though. Alcohol prices were ridiculous (about £15 for a cocktail or £10 for a glass of wine) and restaurant prices weren't much better. You'd struggle to find a decent main course alone for less than £15-20 even in the cheaper places.

Whether I would want to live there in the middle of a dark, cold winter is another matter entirely though.
 

KuroNeeko

Member
Oct 25, 2017
874
Osaka
I'm an American expat living in Japan. I was originally planning on moving back to the States with my family to raise our children to be bi-cultural and bilingual.

I'm strongly considering moving to another country on this list instead, like Canada or even (one of the countries in) Europe.

How easy is it to immigrate to one of these countries and, do you think the European countries will be able to adapt (relatively) to the looming water and resource scarcity threat likely to appear in the years ahead?

For example, Australia seems like a great place, but if the planet keeps heating up aren't they going to get ravished by droughts?
 

legend166

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,287
I'm not surprised in the least that most countries here have a population of less than 10 million. Australia and Canada being higher and Germany being the most populated. It's just so much easy to provide a good and stable life to a smaller, more homogeneous population compared to a diverse country of several hundred million or billion.

And what is a manageable problem for a nation of 6 million may be a complete and utter clusterfuck for a nation of 400 million.
The thing is, I would argue that that's a great reason why America should look to strengthen their state governments rather than relying on the federal government to do everything. Take something like the minimum wage - it's really nonsensical for that to be a federal issue because cost of living varies dramatically from state to state and so pretending to have a one size fits all solution doesn't make a heap of sense.

I guess one of the problems is the idea of 'state's rights' has been so poisoned by the Confederacy and them using it as a excuse to be awful and argue for slavery.
 

Working yet?

Member
Oct 31, 2017
1,864
New Zealand and Australia carrying the Southern Hemisphere. Well done, Canada. Hopefully your insecure neighbour will feel belittled and ashamed and do something to resolve the conundrum facing it. Some ranking factors are a bit odd. Not sure why 'power' would have anything to do with quality of life, for example.