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Divinity: Original Sin II - what am I getting into?

Oct 27, 2017
2,208
Noticed this was on sale for $24.74 on Steam, so I decided to get it. I believe this will be my first ever tabletop CRPG, but I’m no stranger to turn-based strategy games. All of the reviews on Steam and elsewhere are overwhelmingly positive for this game! I’ve been on a bit of a gaming phase where I’m trying out different types of genre and keeping an open mind about things. I’ve read some comments about its difficulty for beginners - any pointers for someone just starting out with this type of game?
 

Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,350
1. Don’t be afraid to set the difficulty to an easier one to get your footing. The game is tough, and while it’s absolutely best enjoyed at a higher difficulty, it can be tricky for a beginner. It can be changed at any time (except to the highest difficulty).
2. If you don’t mind missing out on achievements, you can enable the Fort Joy Mirror (you’ll understand) dev mod to make early game class choices a little more flexible.
3. Have your individual characters specialize into dealing one damage type of another (magic v physical) but your party should be able to do both.
4. If you get a summoner, get them to 10 summoning before anything else.
5. It’s the best CRPGs of the last 15-20 or so, and among the best games of the decade, so have fun!
 

Chivalry

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,849
Remember that it's somewhat of a puzzle game. Every combat/exploration challenge can be solved in a million different ways. Use your wits and imagination and just have fun.
 

SofNascimento

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,560
You're getting into a fantastic journey with one a top tier RPG. Indeed, as far as isometric ones go, I believe it's second only to Baldur's Gate 2.

About tips? Well, get the pel pal perk that allows you to talk with animals, you are going to miss A LOT of good stuff if you don't. Don't worry too much about buildin your characters, this game is very loose with what you can equip and use and it allows to respec all your characters a little into the game. The rest you will find out yourself, I don't there is any hidden mechanic. (Well, maybe this)

One thing that you have to think about is if you want to create your own character or use one that are already there. The latter have unique quests that take place across the entire game and you can still customized them to a great extend, so you won't be missing much in terms of roleplaying. But those quests can be done with them as squadmates.

Is there any particular style/role you want to play?
 

mxbison

Member
Jan 14, 2019
1,606
Its a great game

My advice would be don't get hung up on trying to finish every quest and find every secret, it doesn't have markers everywhere like most games these days. Just play and enjoy the journey.
 

Dlent

Member
Nov 2, 2017
90
I'm a bit of the way into the game, and inventory constantly gets cluttered. There's just so much stuff all the time.
 
OP
OP
MagicWithEarvin
Oct 27, 2017
2,208
You're getting into a fantastic journey with one a top tier RPG. Indeed, as far as isometric ones go, I believe it's second only to Baldur's Gate 2.

About tips? Well, get the pel pal perk that allows you to talk with animals, you are going to miss A LOT of good stuff if you don't. Don't worry too much about buildin your characters, this game is very loose with what you can equip and use and it allows to respec all your characters a little into the game. The rest you will find out yourself, I don't there is any hidden mechanic. (Well, maybe this)

One thing that you have to think about is if you want to create your own character or use one that are already there. The latter have unique quests that take place across the entire game and you can still customized them to a great extend, so you won't be missing much in terms of roleplaying. But those quests can be done with them as squadmates.

Is there any particular style/role you want to play?
Thanks for this! As for your question, I want a spellcaster that will buff / debuff enemies and also throw some cool looking spells out on the field. Is this possible here?
 

Hoo-doo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,676
The Netherlands
One of the best games of the generation. A genuine roleplaying masterpiece. It’s incredibly free-form in it’s design and i’m jealous you’re about to experience it fresh.

If you’re new to CRPG give it a few hours to ‘click’ and get used to the mechanics. But after that you’re in for a ride.

Thanks for this! As for your question, I want a spellcaster that will buff / debuff enemies and also throw some cool looking spells out on the field. Is this possible here?
Absolutely. There’s many classes out there that will do exactly this.
 

Ryo

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,219
It's a great game but it often feels overwhelming, the game throws tonnes of lore, quests and loot at you.
I used custom markers to outline parts of the map that I had explored and that helped a lot with keeping track of my progress especially on Reaper's Coast.

Some puzzles are a bit obtuse unless you pay close attention to everything you read. My first proper CRPG, reached the end last week on PS4 Pro.
 
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Quatermain

Member
Oct 29, 2017
143
I've owned this for a while, and I just made my third attempt trying to get into it this morning. I feel like there's a game I'll really enjoy somewhere in there, but it is really punishing to a new player, especially one who's never really played CRPGs before.

I'm trying to do some stuff out of Fort Joy and it seems like whenever I enter a battle my characters literally end up on fire all the time. How do I even deal with this besides spending AP to run into the nearby water?
 

Chromie

Member
Dec 4, 2017
1,221
I believe this will be my first ever tabletop CRPG
I just have to say, a table top RPG is literally a game you play on top of a table like dungeons and dragons, pathfinder, cyberpunk 2020, Shadowrun or anything in that realm.

You have cRPG right though and this is an excellent one. Honestly though, just play it. I also recommend NOT making a character as all the characters are awesome and have such a great backstory that you can miss out on.

As for difficulty, play it on normal. It’s a lot of fun on higher difficulties but if this is really your first cRPG, you should learn the mechanics of the game before bumping it. This game can be very hard in the beginning and while it can get easier later on, I feel it never gets too easy. You just end up feeling stronger.

But anyway, use the environment to your advantage. Use spells that make effects. Do you have an oil spell? Use it on an enemy and cause an area to slow down enemies. Are there enemies in that oil? Light it on fire. Now everyone is on fire. Have someone who can shoot poison arrows? Do it! Fire + poison = explosion.

Think out of the box. It is Harding changing how you think in a game like this because you don’t realize how much freedom there truly is.
 

aett

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
Northern California
I've owned this for a while, and I just made my third attempt trying to get into it this morning. I feel like there's a game I'll really enjoy somewhere in there, but it is really punishing to a new player, especially one who's never really played CRPGs before.

I'm trying to do some stuff out of Fort Joy and it seems like whenever I enter a battle my characters literally end up on fire all the time. How do I even deal with this besides spending AP to run into the nearby water?
I'm glad it's not just me. On paper, it sounds like an amazing game and one I would enjoy for dozens of hours. In practice, I get confused and bored the first time I try to fight in Fort Joy.
 

Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,350
I've owned this for a while, and I just made my third attempt trying to get into it this morning. I feel like there's a game I'll really enjoy somewhere in there, but it is really punishing to a new player, especially one who's never really played CRPGs before.

I'm trying to do some stuff out of Fort Joy and it seems like whenever I enter a battle my characters literally end up on fire all the time. How do I even deal with this besides spending AP to run into the nearby water?
Where are you running into trouble, specifically? You may be under leveled; they matter quite a bit in DOS2, and especially in the early game.

In general though, it is indeed pretty tough. The game basically expects you to try and cheese things, be that by setting up for a fight ahead of time, focusing ASAP, using items you stole, or so on. If you find yourself on fire, you can try to cast rain ahead of time (an early hydrosophist spell), or just try to load up one character with magic armor.
 

Calabi

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,252
I've owned this for a while, and I just made my third attempt trying to get into it this morning. I feel like there's a game I'll really enjoy somewhere in there, but it is really punishing to a new player, especially one who's never really played CRPGs before.

I'm trying to do some stuff out of Fort Joy and it seems like whenever I enter a battle my characters literally end up on fire all the time. How do I even deal with this besides spending AP to run into the nearby water?
Yeah I cant get into it either for some reason. Just one battle can take nearly 30 mins or an 1 hour at times. And every single battle everyone's on fire and poisoned and stunned, frozen, and blinded and innumerable other status effects I can't even remember, its kind of amazing the number of status effects and really frustrating. Personally I've turned the difficulty down to story mode its the only way I can enjoy the combat. Their also the inventory, its a massive cluster fuck. The maps also feel kind of cluttered. The whole game just feels kind of cluttered and over designed, they've thrown everything into it without any though to whether it was too much.
 

ClearMetal

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,511
Netherlands
The game is fantastic, but very overwhelming. I've listed some pointers below. No need to memorize them beforehand, but they might help should you run into questions.

General tips:
  • Anyone can be anything. Red Prince is a fighter by default, but he can also be a Mage or a Rogue if you want him to be.
  • Don't try to think to much in "archetypes". There are the usual fighter/mage/rogue roles, but again: anyone can be anything. If you feel like a rogue would benefit from a fighter skill, then by all means, put a point into Warfare and have them learn the skill.
  • You can't recruit all party members at the same time. You can however change party members whenever you want on the first island. After that the choice is final, but the game warns you about it beforehand so don't worry about missing the point of no return.
  • You basically want to avoid combat as long as possible in Fort Joy. Try to do as many quests and explore as many areas as you can (since it rewards you exploration bonus xp), which should get you to level 3 without ever drawing your weapon. After that you can focus on the combat missions.
  • New skills can be acquired through books, which are sold by various NPCs. Every NPC is a vendor, so try to make it a habit to trade with everyone you come across just to see if they sell something useful. Trading doesn't interrupt dialogue, so there is no reason not to do it.
  • Don't waste too much money on gear. Shit is expensive and especially in the beginning it will be outdated fast. Your money is better spent on skill books... unless you feel like stealing them of course.
  • You want a rogue around to pick locks, but don't bother buying lockpicks. Instead buy the infinitely cheaper nails and combine them with a hammer (also cheap) in the crafting screen. You get four lockpicks per nail.
  • Some civil skills are shared across the party. If you control Red Prince but Lohse has the Lucky Charm talent (chance at better loot from containers), you will still benefit from it even if you have Red Prince open all crates. Same goes for loremaster.
    • Skills like Persuade, Barter and Lockpicking are tied to the character that learns them. Therefore I usually give my main character, who does most of the talking, Persuade and also Pet Pal so they can talk to and persuade animals.
  • You can unchain your party members. This lets you move them around individually without the others following them. Especially useful when you prepare for battle.
  • You can switch character during actions. If Lohse is talking to an NPC, you can switch to another party member and pick said NPC's pockets while they are distracted (do remember to leave the immediate surroundings after you are done, since pickpocketed NPCs will look for the culprit afterwards).
  • Make sure to pick up a Bed Roll on the ship. They can only be used out of combat, but they instantly heal the entire party and can be used indefinitely.
Combat tips:
  • There are two types of damage: physical and magical. Try to focus on one type in the beginning. It is very possible to do a mixed physical/magic party, but it might be rough when you don't have a feel for the combat yet. I personally find it easiest to let everyone deal physical damage and only use magic as support. Once you get to Act II (earlier if you use mods), you can respec freely and infinitely, so you can always switch to a mixed party later.
  • Try to position your party members before combat. Ranged characters (either bow/crossbow or mages) benefit greatly from high ground as this will greatly increase their range, their damage (in case of Rangers/Wayfarers) and generally keeps them safe from enemies for at least a few turns.
    • The game usually autosaves before fights, so don't hesitate to reload when things go south. In fact, it is a valid strategy to use your first attempt to scout the battlefield and look what your options are in terms of terrain and positioning. The game really likes to screw you over with enemies moving first and using the environment against you. But once you know what the game does, you can make preparations and start the fight on your terms.
  • Have at least one character with the Battering Ram and Battle Stomp. These skills inflict knockdown on enemies that are stripped of their physical armor, forcing them to skip a turn. I cannot overstate how important this debuff is. They require any melee weapon, so your rogue can use them as well if you give them one point of Warfare.
  • Rogues do the most damage when backstabbing, so use Backlash on cooldown and otherwise position them manually behind enemies. Talents like The Pawn (the first few meters of movement don't cost an active point) and Duck Duck Goose (lets them avoid attacks of opportunity) are useful for them.
    • Speaking of which, always make sure your melee characters have the Opportunist talent. This gives them a free attack as enemies move past them (the aforementioned attack of opportunity). And enemies move around a lot. It's a ton of free damage.
An example of early game combat I recorded a while ago, in case you want to see what is possible with the fight system:



Custom Character - Elf - Wayfarer
Red Prince - Inquisitor - bought Battle Stomp for him from the lizard in the elf cave
Beast - Shadowblade - actually gimped him by forgetting to equip him with a second dagger, so his damage was on the low side.
Lohse - Summoner - outfitted with a wand and shield. The wand is actually suboptimal because it deals magical damage (while the rest of the party is physical) but it lets her stay at range and keep a shield equiped for additional armor.
 

SofNascimento

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,560
Thanks for this! As for your question, I want a spellcaster that will buff / debuff enemies and also throw some cool looking spells out on the field. Is this possible here?
Yes. I should add that there aren't really classes in this game. Every character can use anything, in the beginning you do chose a class, but it's just a combination of attributes and skills that can be changed afterwards without any sort of penalty.

The game is fantastic, but very overwhelming. I've listed some pointers below. No need to memorize them beforehand, but they might help should you run into questions.

General tips:
  • Anyone can be anything. Red Prince is a fighter by default, but he can also be a Mage or a Rogue if you want him to be.
  • Don't try to think to much in "archetypes". There are the usual fighter/mage/rogue roles, but again: anyone can be anything. If you feel like a rogue would benefit from a fighter skill, then by all means, put a point into Warfare and have them learn the skill.
  • You can't recruit all party members at the same time. You can however change party members whenever you want on the first island. After that the choice is final, but the game warns you about it beforehand so don't worry about missing the point of no return.
  • You basically want to avoid combat as long as possible in Fort Joy. Try to do as many quests and explore as many areas as you can (since it rewards you exploration bonus xp), which should get you to level 3 without ever drawing your weapon. After that you can focus on the combat missions.
  • New skills can be acquired through books, which are sold by various NPCs. Every NPC is a vendor, so try to make it a habit to trade with everyone you come across just to see if they sell something useful. Trading doesn't interrupt dialogue, so there is no reason not to do it.
  • Don't waste too much money on gear. Shit is expensive and especially in the beginning it will be outdated fast. Your money is better spent on skill books... unless you feel like stealing them of course.
  • You want a rogue around to pick locks, but don't bother buying lockpicks. Instead buy the infinitely cheaper nails and combine them with a hammer (also cheap) in the crafting screen. You get four lockpicks per nail.
  • Some civil skills are shared across the party. If you control Red Prince but Lohse has the Lucky Charm talent (chance at better loot from containers), you will still benefit from it even if you have Red Prince open all crates. Same goes for loremaster.
    • Skills like Persuade, Barter and Lockpicking are tied to the character that learns them. Therefore I usually give my main character, who does most of the talking, Persuade and also Pet Pal so they can talk to and persuade animals.
  • You can unchain your party members. This lets you move them around individually without the others following them. Especially useful when you prepare for battle.
  • You can switch character during actions. If Lohse is talking to an NPC, you can switch to another party member and pick said NPC's pockets while they are distracted (do remember to leave the immediate surroundings after you are done, since pickpocketed NPCs will look for the culprit afterwards).
  • Make sure to pick up a Bed Roll on the ship. They can only be used out of combat, but they instantly heal the entire party and can be used indefinitely.
Combat tips:
  • There are two types of damage: physical and magical. Try to focus on one type in the beginning. It is very possible to do a mixed physical/magic party, but it might be rough when you don't have a feel for the combat yet. I personally find it easiest to let everyone deal physical damage and only use magic as support. Once you get to Act II (earlier if you use mods), you can respec freely and infinitely, so you can always switch to a mixed party later.
  • Try to position your party members before combat. Ranged characters (either bow/crossbow or mages) benefit greatly from high ground as this will greatly increase their range, their damage (in case of Rangers/Wayfarers) and generally keeps them safe from enemies for at least a few turns.
    • The game usually autosaves before fights, so don't hesitate to reload when things go south. In fact, it is a valid strategy to use your first attempt to scout the battlefield and look what your options are in terms of terrain and positioning. The game really likes to screw you over with enemies moving first and using the environment against you. But once you know what the game does, you can make preparations and start the fight on your terms.
  • Have at least one character with the Battering Ram and Battle Stomp. These skills inflict knockdown on enemies that are stripped of their physical armor, forcing them to skip a turn. I cannot overstate how important this debuff is. They require any melee weapon, so your rogue can use them as well if you give them one point of Warfare.
  • Rogues do the most damage when backstabbing, so use Backlash on cooldown and otherwise position them manually behind enemies. Talents like The Pawn (the first few meters of movement don't cost an active point) and Duck Duck Goose (lets them avoid attacks of opportunity) are useful for them.
    • Speaking of which, always make sure your melee characters have the Opportunist talent. This gives them a free attack as enemies move past them (the aforementioned attack of opportunity). And enemies move around a lot. It's a ton of free damage.
An example of early game combat I recorded a while ago, in case you want to see what is possible with the fight system:



Custom Character - Elf - Wayfarer
Red Prince - Inquisitor - bought Battle Stomp for him from the lizard in the elf cave
Beast - Shadowblade - actually gimped him by forgetting to equip him with a second dagger, so his damage was on the low side.
Lohse - Summoner - outfitted with a wand and shield. The wand is actually suboptimal because it deals magical damage (while the rest of the party is physical) but it lets her stay at range and keep a shield equiped for additional armor.
some pointers



Joke aside, great post!
 
Oct 25, 2017
13,730
Austria
The game is very manageable for beginners, all the stats are very clearly explained and logical so you don't have to worry too much about that during character creation. Pick Pet Pal, trust me on this.

The beginning of the game can be very hard, so don't start fights with enemies above your level. Try to complete a couple of quests that don't involve fighting. Be creative, sneak around and avoid open conflict if you can't take enemies. Save often. Exploration also yields XP. Don't worry too much about to putting points into the "wrong" stats at some point you gain access to a free respect mirror that you can use as often as you want.
 

SofNascimento

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,560
Hahaha. It started out as a few, but I kept adding things.

I still think it's accurate, relatively speaking. I could write a book about this game...
I feel that about some games. Anyway, Divinity 2 is definitely a game worth writing a book about.

I'm just waiting some news about Baldur's Gate III to be hyped and have another excuse for a new playthrough.
 

Roytheone

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,540
Quick save, quick save and quick save! Seriously quick save all the time. It's very easy to accidentally walk into a fight way to high level for you and get insta nuked. You do not want to lose progress because of that. QUICK SAVE!

Also look up maps online that show the level ranges of areas . It will make your life a lot easier.
 

K Samedi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,433
It’s a tough game to master but if you feel like an enemy or quest is too hard just do other quests. There’s always something more manageble out there and when you level up and get better gear try the more tougher ones.
 

Sanctuary

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,648
Noticed this was on sale for $24.74 on Steam, so I decided to get it. I believe this will be my first ever tabletop CRPG, but I’m no stranger to turn-based strategy games. All of the reviews on Steam and elsewhere are overwhelmingly positive for this game! I’ve been on a bit of a gaming phase where I’m trying out different types of genre and keeping an open mind about things. I’ve read some comments about its difficulty for beginners - any pointers for someone just starting out with this type of game?
Don't be afraid to mix and match schools, and you don't necessarily have to focus too much into any specific school to grab some really good skills. Like: Tactical Retreat (Huntsman), Chameleon Cloak (Polymorph) and Adrenaline (Scoundrel). These compliment every playstyle from a very small investment.

If you've ever played Mass Effect 2 or 3 (who hasn't?), then you will have an idea on how the magic/armor shields work in this game. You have to remove the blue bar, or the silver bar to actually target enemy health. For that reason alone you'll either want to focus on either an all physical group, all magical group or a 2:2 split. Try to have at least one Archer type character in your group that uses a crossbow early on. They were the single most broken "class" in the default game before all of the patches, and they are still super strong now.

What I would not suggest though, for a first time playthrough is trying to make random hybrid characters that try to combine both magic and physical attacks into a single character. There are plenty of builds where that will work, but they are more advanced, and you might end up having to look at a guide to get the best out of them. Unlike what I said above, most of the dipping into other schools (even if they are primarily physical or magical based) are more auxiliary in use and provide movement or damage bonuses that don't particularly care what enemy you're facing. Also, Necromancy is primarily a physical school, not magical.

Early on, certain spells will combo together to make more powerful results than if you were to use each spell individually, such as tossing a random Earth Spell that leaves a flammable substance all over the ground, such as Fossil Strike or even a Poison spell, and then igniting them with a targeted Fire spell such as Searing Daggers or even Fireball. You can get similar combinations with stuff like Water + Lightning, although that combo can be trickier since you can easily stun your own party members due to how long electrified water tends to last.

If you are going to try combos, you can either have two schools that can combo together on a single character such as Fire+Earth, or divide those duties up since AP is so limited. So if you were using two casters, you could have one of them with Earth+Air and on the other Fire+Water (or Earth/Water, Fire/Air). That way, you could have the first caster do the initial part of a combo, and then have the second caster finish it. Both methods have their advantages.

Later though these spell combinations start mattering a lot less in lieu of much more powerful area of effect spells that take a lot of AP to cast, but can wipe out groups with a single cast.

Action Points matter a lot, and IMO, Elves are one of the best races to play because of this. Also, if you plan on using a Rogue type character, make sure to pick up either The Pawn or Executioner as well as Backlash. These will allow the character to actually move around the screen and deal damage on their turn, instead of having to alternate between moving and killing.

Lastly, Warfare is the best school for all physical based characters. Focus on raising this first when trying to up your damage.
 
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Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,350
I feel that about some games. Anyway, Divinity 2 is definitely a game worth writing a book about.

I'm just waiting some news about Baldur's Gate III to be hyped and have another excuse for a new playthrough.
Does Gift Bag 3 not trigger that itch? They just added an enemy buff randomizer, a pretty substantial summoning boost, and a few extra QoL things (shared persuasion, better bags, etc).

I’m very slowly working my way through my second playthrough, but I’m also starting to make a summoning mod myself. It’s just too good.
 

SofNascimento

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,560
Does Gift Bag 3 not trigger that itch? They just added an enemy buff randomizer, a pretty substantial summoning boost, and a few extra QoL things (shared persuasion, better bags, etc).

I’m very slowly working my way through my second playthrough, but I’m also starting to make a summoning mod myself. It’s just too good.
Oh I wasn't aware the third one was out. Are there more to come? I was thinking about waiting for them all.
 

Stabbie

Member
May 8, 2019
1,591
Noticed this was on sale for $24.74 on Steam, so I decided to get it. I believe this will be my first ever tabletop CRPG, but I’m no stranger to turn-based strategy games. All of the reviews on Steam and elsewhere are overwhelmingly positive for this game! I’ve been on a bit of a gaming phase where I’m trying out different types of genre and keeping an open mind about things. I’ve read some comments about its difficulty for beginners - any pointers for someone just starting out with this type of game?
play in tactician, dont open any guides and just go with the flow. Keep in mind that hybrid characters (magic + physical) arent very good and you're set

This game's quests aren't linear, there are no markers and the combat is nothing short of stellar. Elements interact between them so use your head. I made one of the craziest lone wolves party I could think of and it worked beautifully. By craziest I mean it was entirely centered around keeping my warrior at 1hp while she'd get mega buffed and basically unkillable for three turns by my necro, while flying around on the battlefield with the wings you get in polymorph and using the two charges of warrior. An unstoppable glass canon ram-which-also-was-a-valkyrie. It was hilarious
 
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Twenty7kvn

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
1,012
Does this run well on the switch?
Not really the games frame rate can drop pretty low in and out of battle (mostly when alot of effects are around. It has few glitches like delayed sound effects, AI enemies can take long time to start their turn sometimes, and I've experienced crashing ( more frequent with the latest patch). But with all that I still manage to put 250 plus hours into it, it's truly and amazing game.
 

Agamon

Member
Aug 1, 2019
139
As someone who played BG back in the day, I've found I can't get back into isometric RPGs these days. Tried replaying BG and BG2, Planescape Torment, and D:OS 1 and I often quit less then 10 hours in. But D:OS2 is amazing, just finished it this past week, and it was tough to put down.

In my roughly 70 hour playthrough, I found the fights toughest in the first and last 10 hours. There's one side mission near the end that it ridiculous that I just walked away from, and the final fight definitely isn't winnable the first time through without a lot of luck.

Great game, though.
 

Twenty7kvn

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
1,012
As someone who played BG back in the day, I've found I can't get back into isometric RPGs these days. Tried replaying BG and BG2, Planescape Torment, and D:OS 1 and I often quit less then 10 hours in. But D:OS2 is amazing, just finished it this past week, and it was tough to put down.

In my roughly 70 hour playthrough, I found the fights toughest in the first and last 10 hours. There's one side mission near the end that it ridiculous that I just walked away from, and the final fight definitely isn't winnable the first time through without a lot of luck.

Great game, though.
Yea this game is so amazing to me that when i got to the final fight and knew i couldn't do it i didn't have a problem starting over with different charters. That one side mission you're talking about is it the
adramahlihk
fight? If so i heard he's the hardest fight in the game if you don't have
lohse
in your party and don't follow her quest up until that point.
 

DarkStream

Member
Oct 27, 2017
281
You are about to get into one of the best CRPG in years. Enjoy the ride and don't feel overwhelmed. It will fall into place eventually. There ist so many ways to play this, don't stress about playing it "correctly."
 

Agamon

Member
Aug 1, 2019
139
Yea this game is so amazing to me that when i got to the final fight and knew i couldn't do it i didn't have a problem starting over with different charters. That one side mission you're talking about is it the
adramahlihk
fight? If so i heard he's the hardest fight in the game if you don't have
lohse
in your party and don't follow her quest up until that point.
Yeah, I figured out near the end of the fight what it was I needed to try, but it looked like it was going to be a PITA and I was trying to get to the end of the game so I could move on to Outer Worlds.
 

Igor

Member
Oct 31, 2017
351
One thing I did early game is just save often and experiment. If it worked, ill save again and continue. If it didn't just reload and try something else. Later on you become more confident in your choices but the game world's is campy and bizarre and takes time to get familiar with (like you, it's prob my first game of this kind). I also play on explorer mode as the game plays quite different to what I know best, which is tactical RPGs.
 

Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,350
Oh I wasn't aware the third one was out. Are there more to come? I was thinking about waiting for them all.
They said 5 I think? 3 just came out. Although I dunno if you’re on PC; there are 2 very notable complete overhaul mods there: Divine War and Epic Encounters 2. EE2 especially is a complete 180.
How much represents Fort Joy in % for those who pass through it?
The Fort itself? I’d say like...7.5%, and then the island in total is 20%.
 

Jakisthe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,350
You mean, the Island before the fort right?
No, I mean the entirety of the game until the point of escaping from Fort Joy - the attacked ship, the shipwreck beach, the town, and the Fort itself - is probably like 7.5~10%. Escaping from Fort Joy is only one small part of escaping from the island of Reaper’s Eye, and it’s absolutely not the largest act.
 

DC5remy

Member
Jan 20, 2018
1,154
I picked this up for the PS4 last month and have had my mind blown by how in depth it is. What an excellent rpg. You actually want to talk to NPCs and go explore, it’s great.