• The GiftBot 2.0 Launch Giveaway Extravaganza has come to a close with an astounding 8073 games given away to the community by 696 members, a huge success thanks to you! The gifting now continues with more official prizes in the new Gaming Giveaways |OT|. Leftover Steam codes are also being given away to the PC Gaming Era community.

Finally going to college after 7 years of working and doing so on my own time and my own dime, feels fucking great

Hobbes

Incident Manager
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,117
United States
So after 7 years of various jobs and switching careers into IT management, I am going to college on my own time and on my own dime (no loans yet!!!) and I'm feeling fucking great about it.

I'm taking basic algebra, French, and an academics success course. I'm two credits shy of being considered full time and I will continue to work full time at my job with little issue (hopefully.)

I'm just here to celebrate, and if yall got any tips for classes, let me know.
 

cjbenny

Member
Oct 29, 2017
61
Hey! I'm sort of in the same boat, been away from college for about nine years and went back as a full-time student in 2018. It really is freeing being a little older, I knew what I wanted and wasn't a lost and lazy teen anymore. Learning feels much more fulfilling now.
 

Vertpin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,176
So after 7 years of various jobs and switching careers into IT management, I am going to college on my own time and on my own dime (no loans yet!!!) and I'm feeling fucking great about it.

I'm taking basic algebra, French, and an academics success course. I'm two credits shy of being considered full time and I will continue to work full time at my job with little issue (hopefully.)

I'm just here to celebrate, and if yall got any tips for classes, let me know.
Be sure to make enough time for your classes as per their credit hours. Trying to balance a full time job and nearly full time credits is exhausting, but fortunately its just basic algebra and those other two classes.
 
OP
OP
Hobbes

Hobbes

Incident Manager
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,117
United States
Be sure to make enough time for your classes as per their credit hours. Trying to balance a full time job and nearly full time credits is exhausting, but fortunately its just basic algebra and those other two classes.
My third class is online only, and the other two are on different days with like 3 days off to just study. I'm hoping it won't be too bad.
 

Vinx

Member
Sep 9, 2019
43
After working a while I went back to school. I had to move to third shift so I could take the classes and I paid for everything out of my own pocket.

I got my degree in Mechanical Engineering and programming and now Im making 3 times more than when I started.

I was very hard and very costly but I am SOOOO much happier now with where Im at in life. Sure, the days when I had to go to an 4 hour evening class, then go from class directly to work for 8 hours and then go from work directly to a 3 hour morning class was not fun but I got through it.

So, I know how hard it is to be a full time working adult going back to school. Best of luck and push through those bad days.
 

xaM

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,389
U.S.
I did the same thing this past semester. I couldn't be happier with my decision. I gotta admit it took a week or so for my brain to get used to all the stimulation.
 
Oct 27, 2017
442
I'm hoping to go to college (I'm 37). I'm wanting to study history with either politics and society or spanish.
 

Syriel

Member
Dec 13, 2017
6,544
So after 7 years of various jobs and switching careers into IT management, I am going to college on my own time and on my own dime (no loans yet!!!) and I'm feeling fucking great about it.

I'm taking basic algebra, French, and an academics success course. I'm two credits shy of being considered full time and I will continue to work full time at my job with little issue (hopefully.)

I'm just here to celebrate, and if yall got any tips for classes, let me know.
Congrats!
 

PhoncipleBone

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,038
Kentucky, USA
Congrats Hobbes
Started back at a community college two years ago and paying out of pocket. First time in college in 20 years and felt good. About to graduate with two new degrees this semester. It is so interesting going back and taking glasses with a totally diff mindset as an adult.
 
OP
OP
Hobbes

Hobbes

Incident Manager
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,117
United States
Congrats Hobbes
Started back at a community college two years ago and paying out of pocket. First time in college in 20 years and felt good. About to graduate with two new degrees this semester. It is so interesting going back and taking glasses with a totally diff mindset as an adult.
I think that is what I'm looking forward to the most. I've finally hit that point in my life where I am excited to learn about something and since im paying for it... better not fucking fail haha.
 
Nov 23, 2017
316
Don’t forget to fill out your fafsa. After age 24, you’re considered an independent student and no longer need to provide your parents income. You never know how much you could be eligible for.
 
Nov 23, 2017
316
That’s how you get free money. You don’t have to get loans, but it shows you all the grants you are eligible for. Your school’s financial aid will help you.

You should be eligible for the Pell Grant. Almost $6,000 a school year for full time. Free. No strings attached. In California, I was eligible for the board of governer’s fee waiver. I didn’t pay anything for classes, just student fees and still received the pell grant. And even at the university, I’m eligible for the university’s grant and pell grant that pretty much covers the cost of attendance.

Fafsa is amazing. Just fill it out.
 

Aizō

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
7,123
ほぼ真ん中の方
because my end goal is to teach English as a second language, because I want to leave the US.
Sorry if I'm providing unsolicited and unwanted advice here, but I want to ask if you have another country in mind first. I'd say that if you do, focus on learning their language rather than getting an English degree just for teaching. You don't need an English degree to teach ESL abroad. Hell, you don't even need any sort of real training beyond any BA for a lot of English teaching abroad. If you do move to another country with teaching English there are your career in mind, be prepared for potentially limited upward mobility.

Let's use Japan as an example, because that's where I lived for years. I've known many people that taught for a long time and weren't making much money or working where they wanted. One of my close friends has a masters in linguistics focusing on language acquisition, 5 years of experience teaching English, and still doesn't work at the ideal location. On the other hand, I've known lots of people that work in tech/IT from India, US, Nepal, parts of Europe, and they came with little to no Japanese and ended up with great jobs (but usually needed to improve their Japanese to get to those positions). Sorry if this isn't helpful. I just don't wanna see someone put themselves in a position teaching English unless that's really their dream, because I've seen a lot of people live shitty lives due to being trapped in that field.
 
OP
OP
Hobbes

Hobbes

Incident Manager
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
4,117
United States
Sorry if I'm providing unsolicited and unwanted advice here, but I want to ask if you have another country in mind first. I'd say that if you do, focus on learning their language rather than getting an English degree just for teaching. You don't need an English degree to teach ESL abroad. Hell, you don't even need any sort of real training beyond any BA for a lot of English teaching abroad. If you do move to another country with teaching English there are your career in mind, be prepared for potentially limited upward mobility.

Let's use Japan as an example, because that's where I lived for years. I've known many people that taught for a long time and weren't making much money or working where they wanted. One of my close friends has a masters in linguistics focusing on language acquisition, 5 years of experience teaching English, and still doesn't work at the ideal location. On the other hand, I've known lots of people that work in tech/IT from India, US, Nepal, parts of Europe, and they came with little to no Japanese and ended up with great jobs (but usually needed to improve their Japanese to get to those positions). Sorry if this isn't helpful. I just don't wanna see someone put themselves in a position teaching English unless that's really their dream, because I've seen a lot of people live shitty lives due to being trapped in that field.
ESL in south east asia is hit or miss because of how many businesses there are, which means you have to be careful about what you pick. This means two things:

1. You get unlucky and are in a position that sucks
2. You get lucky and love what you do

Since my first country of choice will probably be Korea, I already know how the system works and how it can be played. There are certain ways to land contracts that pay you good money and house you for free, and given that the standard of living is cheap, it will be good for me.