• Introducing Image Options for ResetEra 2.0! Check the left side navigation bar to show or hide images, avatars, covers, and embedded media. More details at the link.
  • Community Spotlight sign-ups are open once again for both Gaming and EtcetEra Hangout threads! If you want to shine a spotlight on your community, please register now.

Fire breaks out at Notre Dame cathedral, developing situation [Update: major structural collapse - Art and other Assets Saved] (See Staff Post)

Oct 27, 2017
6,533
I had made sure to go inside and all the way up during my first visit to Notre Dame.

I really regret not doing so again the second time last year.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,805
I believe the heads were removed during the French revolution because they thought they were supposed to be kings or some bs
The statues were made decades after the French Revolution....


In actual reality they were probably cast separately and separated for the purposes of safely craning them up via the inside of the torso.
 
Apr 21, 2018
32
the history of great buildings is as much about what they survived as anything really. places like the collessium or the aya sofia or the acropolis have such power and inspire such awe because they’ve existed through lifetimes and lifetimes and are not static objects but ever changing ones, having different meanings at different moments & always bearing the visible scars of our history. notre dame is more powerful than ever at this moment.
 
Nov 2, 2017
272
the history of great buildings is as much about what they survived as anything really. places like the collessium or the aya sofia or the acropolis have such power and inspire such awe because they’ve existed through lifetimes and lifetimes and are not static objects but ever changing ones, having different meanings at different moments & always bearing the visible scars of our history. notre dame is more powerful than ever at this moment.
Username checks out, very well said.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,175
I believe the heads were removed during the French revolution because they thought they were supposed to be kings or some bs
They removed the heads of the stone statues on ground level which were indeed statues of kings. I don't know about these copper statues that were high on the spire though.
The spire, including the statues, were added in the middle of the 19th century about 60 years after the French Revolution.
 
Oct 28, 2017
3,092
the history of great buildings is as much about what they survived as anything really. places like the collessium or the aya sofia or the acropolis have such power and inspire such awe because they’ve existed through lifetimes and lifetimes and are not static objects but ever changing ones, having different meanings at different moments & always bearing the visible scars of our history. notre dame is more powerful than ever at this moment.
Indeed.

I think it's important to remember here that buildings like those don't survive simply because they are well built. All of them have gone through disasters. They survive (at least partially) because people care enough to repair them as well as they can.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,669
Looked at the wiki

It reminds me of Anor Londo in the souls games.

Was talking with an architect friend just an hour ago, this was one of his favourite buildings ever and told me these buttresses are what saved the whole cathedral structure and interior, made the stone roof of the inside withstand the wooden part collapsing because of the fire.
This were made to witchstand the weight of the structure as they had to make the walls have the inmense holes to put he giant stained glass.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,342
Netherlands
Looked at the wiki

It reminds me of Anor Londo in the souls games.

Anor Londo seems to be something of a mishmash of several real-life cathedrals and other buildings (the Milan Cathedral in particular serving as a big inspiration if I am not mistaken). The interior (or at least the famous "try jumping off" staircase) looks to be a direct copy of the staircase in Château de Chambord:

 
Apr 21, 2018
32
Indeed.

I think it's important to remember here that buildings like those don't survive simply because they are well built. All of them have gone through disasters. They survive (at least partially) because people care enough to repair them as well as they can.
yes, exactly

this is what the parthenon looked like in the 1830s, long abandoned after a gunpowder cache exploded inside it centuries ago, the frieze looted by lord elgin’s agents, the grounds used as a location for a mosque (a very interesting part of its storied history)

this is what you see if you visit athens today, reconstructed from the ruins and fragment dug up on the acropolis

 
I was in Paris in October. One night I was out drinking with some friends, and it was getting late, so I needed to get back to my hotel in Montmartre. Rather than get a taxi, I opted for a Mobike (I already had an active account due to living in Shanghai). As I rode back to the hotel, and I crossed over the Seine, I glanced left and right to cross the road, and to my surprise there was the Notre Dame right beside me, sitting there peacefully as it had for 900 years prior. While crossing the bridge, I just stared at it, and wondered how many others, just like me, looked at this amazing structure creep up on them in the darkness.

I have no idea why I found this simple moment so profound, but I did. It's really sad to see the damage it's suffered.
 
Last edited:
Oct 25, 2017
7,329
That is a very powerful image for sure. The imagery of the Cross amidst all the rubble and wreckage.

Still, I am amazed at how much is left, I thought it would be nothing but a charred husk. Especially when looking back at the aerial photos that the Drone's took earlier of the top of it all:
In the end most of that powerful fire that looked like lava at some point seems to have being contained on top of the stone arches and that made the main hall only partially destroyed.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,234
The cross is still standing, beautiful :

the limestone roof only collapsed under the spire. The fire burned the wooden roof and it fell on the rock bed but it never made it under. Unbelievable. We can clearly see that there were minimal fire damage inside (beside the part of the collapsed spire...
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,960
Indeed.

I think it's important to remember here that buildings like those don't survive simply because they are well built. All of them have gone through disasters. They survive (at least partially) because people care enough to repair them as well as they can.
The cathedral in Cologne had direct hits 14 times
That is a very powerful image for sure. The imagery of the Cross amidst all the rubble and wreckage.

Still, I am amazed at how much is left, I thought it would be nothing but a charred husk. Especially when looking back at the aerial photos that the Drone's took earlier of the top of it all:
Yeah, those pictures made it look totally fucked, but it looks like the charred parts are so close to the top because it was the wooden parts of the roof collapsing on to the stone ceiling.

is it true all the artifacts were saved?
Many of the major ones were saved, it sounds like, but at least some of the stuff was water damaged or crushed by the dome collapse. I'd imagine the wooden panel decorations were too big to evacuate and are pretty damaged by the water.
 
Last edited: