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Firefox Quantum |OT| - Ground up redesign with new speed engine, UI, & extensions

Oct 25, 2017
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Hey guys, sorry if it was mentioned anywhere else but its a super long thread lol, I wanted to ask whats the best browser at the moment? Is it Firefox, Chrome, Safari, or another browser? I'm on a Mac so I can't use Edge.
 
Oct 27, 2017
313
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Poland
I'm using Firefox on mobile due to the bookmarks, history and login synchronization. The Android version of FF is OK, although recently it's been a little buggy for me - every once in a while I have to force close the app, otherwise it stops rendering pages (it loads them, but pages stay white).
 
Oct 25, 2017
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Do you guys use Firefox on Android as well? If not, what browser? Been using Firefox Beta on Android for awhile. I like it.
I use Firefox on Android. It is alright.

I do know there is one issue where some big phones get the tablet layout which is bad

On the plus side it supports addons like uBlock Origin and others to make web browsing a better experience.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,643
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Taiwan
Why doesn't the exception list for keeping cookies not work for some sites?

Example is reddit. I did the ctrl+shift+i to see and added - yet I have to sign in every time. Did they gimp this or something?
 
Oct 30, 2017
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Getting some really strange issues with this latest version. The icon for firefox keeps disappearing from my taskbar (it just shows as a blank document), and some of my bookmarks folders are opening themselves up at times. Really, really odd.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,317
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Is there an addon that allows you to add Youtube videos to playlists from the embedded view? I don't like that I have to open a video on Youtube itself to add it to a playlist.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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Not sure how I feel about the disabling of disabling auto-updates unless you go through a more convoluted way. I mean I get why they did it and with a browser it's far less on an issue than with a OS like Windows 10 but still options are generally not inherently a negative thing. I always test new updates in a copied profile because I have a big UserChrome.css file and I want to know what breaks before I update my actual profile and install. Still I feel tucking it away into about:config would have been enough.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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The problem is less and less people are using the browser nowadays, so the developers have less knowledge of what features are popular or needed, so they make bad decisions, so even less people use the browser... It's a vicious circle.
Even so I would argue that automatically restoring the previous tabs is an essential function of any browser and it shouldn't ever be questioned if it's needed.
 
Nov 10, 2017
503
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tbh it was an option (to enable in about:config)



This post on the bugzilla forum explained it nicely:
Imagine this: usually I browse around and have senseless tabs. Then I don't want to save those. Obvious I guess.

But SOMETIMES I have a bunch of important tabs and I need them the next time. As you might be able to understand, the next time you open firefox you don't think about your last session. That's mostly the reason for writing a memory note the moment you have the idea and not the moment I need the idea... Or your shopping list - you don't write them at the store.

So since the second is more important, I have to restore the tabs always. For me this wastes a lot of time.

I don't want my browser to think instead of me...
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,317
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tbh it was an option (to enable in about:config)



This post on the bugzilla forum explained it nicely:
Wait so it can be reenabled atleast? Still they are only basing this off one type of user, I for example "live" constantly in the same browser-session that changes and evolves as I use tabs sort of like bookmarks. Is the "Show Last Session" option still available in Startup Options?
 
Nov 10, 2017
503
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Wait so it can be reenabled atleast?
No, browser.showQuitWarning completely disappeared from about:config. Save and Quit is gone for good (unless somebody made an extension for it, but I don't understand why it should be needed in the first place)

Is the "Show Last Session" option still available in Startup Options?
This is still in - but I usually want my Starting page when opening the browser, unless I specifically chose "Save and Quit" to resume later.

The bugzilla thread explains it better than I can, I realize it's not an option everyone uses but it was damn useful.
 
Oct 25, 2017
841
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Wait, is there restore tabs from previous session at least? Like chome? Or is it straight either fresh start or all your tabs back (no choice when you start)?
 
Nov 10, 2017
503
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Wait, is there restore tabs from previous session at least?
Yes, but you have to manually click History > Restore previous session

As someone said in the forum, "The time that I know that I’m going to want to restore the session is when I’m about to close Firefox." (and not when I open it again later, because I may very well forget)


So now you can either set it to always restore your previous session, or do it manually when you open it up.
'Save and Quit' was useful because you didn't have to worry about your session: if you saved it, it would have simply been there the next time you'd open Firefox. Fair and logical
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,317
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No, browser.showQuitWarning completely disappeared from about:config. Save and Quit is gone for good (unless somebody made an extension for it, but I don't understand why it should be needed in the first place)


This is still in - but I usually want my Starting page when opening the browser, unless I specifically chose "Save and Quit" to resume later.

The bugzilla thread explains it better than I can, I realize it's not an option everyone uses but it was damn useful.
Well aslong as the startup setting is still there and the session can be manually restored it's fine I guess but I hope this change gets communicated to the users after the update so they can get their sessions back if they want to.
 
Nov 28, 2017
251
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Firefox 63.0.3 is now out.

Release notes: https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/63.0.3/releasenotes/

Anyone else getting the "Your connection is not secure" error when trying to visit Era? It's recently started popping up for me on multiple sites, including my school's library website so I can't access research papers. Super frustrating.
I have not run into that error. According to this page it may be an issue with either your system's clock being off or an issue with an antivirus program intercepting secure connections. Those might be worth looking into especially if you have one of the antivirus programs listed there.
 
Oct 25, 2017
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France
Nov 10, 2017
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Nov 28, 2017
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In some potentially concerning news Microsoft has announced that they are dropping support for their own EdgeHTML browser engine and are going to start basing Edge on Chromium instead. This means that Firefox is the last major non-WebKit/Blink based browser left standing. This news has me worried about what this means for the future of Firefox and the larger web in general. Google is now approaching a 90s Microsoft level of control over the internet yet this time fewer people seem to care.

Edit: Mozilla blog post on the topic: Goodbye, EdgeHTML
 
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Oct 25, 2017
841
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In some potentially concerning news Microsoft has announced that they are dropping support for their own EdgeHTML browser engine and are going to start basing Edge on Chromium instead. This means that Firefox is the last major non-WebKit/Blink based browser left standing. This news has me worried about what this means for the future of Firefox and the larger web in general. Google is now approaching a 90s Microsoft level of control over the internet yet this time fewer people seem to care.
Can you provide more detail and info and on why having less browser engines is bad?
 
Oct 26, 2017
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Can you provide more detail and info and on why having less browser engines is bad?
In the short term, it might not be so bad. Chrome is a good browser--for users and developers. It's not like when Microsoft had dominance over the space, and--because of their crap, standards-flouting browser--made it harder to design and devlelop good websites for everyone.

Long-term, it stinks. Likely that Google gets a bigger seat at the table in determining what web standards of the future will be, which of course they'll use for business advantage. That could mean a lot of things: maybe making it so their web apps (Maps, Docs, etc.) perform better than any equivalent apps in Chrome/Chromium, or at least giving those apps a head start in taking advantage of new and upcoming standards. And those standards may not prioritize things like accessibility and privacy unless Google sees it in their interest (or is forced by law) to do so.
 
Nov 28, 2017
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Can you provide more detail and info and on why having less browser engines is bad?
The beauty of the internet is its open nature and cross-platform ubiquity. No single corporation or developer controls it. If that were to happen it could threaten the future of the open internet. Having viable competition in the browser space is important to prevent this from happening.

The internet specifications are supposed to be open but at the end of the day web developers are typically going to be working against actual browser implementations rather than the official specs themselves. As a consequence of this the browser developers with the greatest market share end up with the most power in implementing web standards. Back in the day this was the concern with Internet Explorer and Microsoft's infamous "Embrace, Extend, and Extinguish" tactics. The threat was that if MS got their way the internet would no longer be the standard, Internet Explorer would be, and MS could effectively dictate the future of the internet. At its peak in the early 2000s Internet Explorer had ~94% market share but thanks to the development of Firefox and Apple's Safari and pushback from web developers and internet advocates, MS control of the internet ultimately never came to pass and Internet Explorer's market share gradually eroded. It's debatable whether there's ever been any truly healthy level of competition between browsers but at least in the later 2000s and earlier 2010s there were more independent viable options: Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Opera, and later Chrome.

However with the decline of Internet Explorer came the rise of Chrome. Utilizing some impressive technological advancements along with some very aggressive marketing Google was able to rapidly gain position in the browser space. This has resulted in Chrome starting to gain IE-like dominance. And the dominance of Chrome is already leading to anti-competitive behaviours. Google has admitted they frequently no longer even bother testing on browsers other than Chrome and Safari, they redesigned YouTube based on a non-standard spec only implemented in Chrome so it runs like crap on other browsers, Hangouts for months didn't work in non-Chrome browsers as Google's WebRTC implementation didn't properly follow the spec, and there are many other examples. Google is even currently trying to create a game streaming service that only runs in Chrome. If Chrome market share continues to rise expect this kind of behaviour to become more and more common.

The modern internet has become so complex that it's become extremely difficult to create a new browser engine from scratch. Doing so takes years of work and tons of resources which at this point limits it to companies and organizations with lots of experience and sufficiently deep pockets. Once a browser engine is abandoned it becomes very difficult to ever resume development in any meaningful capacity. Now that Microsoft has largely ceded control of Edge's engine to Google it will be extremely difficult for them to regain independence in the future. Sure they can fork the code but if the issue is that developers ignored them in favour of Google then they’re just back to square one.

Overall the main issue to me is the longer term threat. What happens to the internet if Google effectively dictates its future? Do anti-tracking measures still exist? Does ad blocking? Does more invasive DRM become the standard? Do developers write cross-platform web content or do they develop exclusively for Chrome? Is any new internet competitor immediately snuffed out? Are new internet standards designed to benefit the user or are they made to benefit Google's bottom line? I feel like a lot is at stake here and this topic frequently isn't given the attention it deserves.