Fitness |OT| A New Era Begins

Oct 27, 2017
2,893
Hey I posted a couple weeks ago talking about how I was sure what I wanted out of lifting, and it's actually gotten worse.

First of all, I started getting really bad tennis elbow, to the point that I took a week off. I only lifted once this week and it mostly felt fine, but I'm not feeling that consistent drive anymore. I decided I never want to compete in powerlifting, and now I'm not sure why I'm still training mostly powerlifting. I have a coach and I'm wondering if I even need him. He gives me pretty brutal programming; actually his programming has been too brutal as of late. It's probably why I'm burning out. Two of my five days are up to three hours of work, with TONS of volume on the compounds. I'm not sure why he's suddenly pushing me so hard. I never looked into programming on my own because this guy has literally been my coach from day one. He took me from barely being able to box squat 20 pounds to somewhat respectable numbers in less than a year and a half. No joke, before I met him I was completely fucked... almost immobile for YEARS. He transformed my life... I can't deny that.

Man this is more rambly than I expected, but the bottom line is this: I lost track of what my goals are; essentially I'm lost. I have no idea where to go from here.

I just know there's a (shallow) part of me that wants to "look strong". Like nobody has once commented that I look like I lift weights, even though I'm far stronger than the average person. I might need to shed this idea because it's inherently unhealthy.

All I know is it feels weird to lift for no particular reason. Is it for health? Because I certainly don't feel healthy. Strong maybe, but not healthy. I feel like garbage pretty much all the time.
 

ArkhamFantasy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,707
Hey I posted a couple weeks ago talking about how I was sure what I wanted out of lifting, and it's actually gotten worse.

First of all, I started getting really bad tennis elbow, to the point that I took a week off. I only lifted once this week and it mostly felt fine, but I'm not feeling that consistent drive anymore. I decided I never want to compete in powerlifting, and now I'm not sure why I'm still training mostly powerlifting. I have a coach and I'm wondering if I even need him. He gives me pretty brutal programming; actually his programming has been too brutal as of late. It's probably why I'm burning out. Two of my five days are up to three hours of work, with TONS of volume on the compounds. I'm not sure why he's suddenly pushing me so hard. I never looked into programming on my own because this guy has literally been my coach from day one. He took me from barely being able to box squat 20 pounds to somewhat respectable numbers in less than a year and a half. No joke, before I met him I was completely fucked... almost immobile for YEARS. He transformed my life... I can't deny that.

Man this is more rambly than I expected, but the bottom line is this: I lost track of what my goals are; essentially I'm lost. I have no idea where to go from here.

I just know there's a (shallow) part of me that wants to "look strong". Like nobody has once commented that I look like I lift weights, even though I'm far stronger than the average person. I might need to shed this idea because it's inherently unhealthy.

All I know is it feels weird to lift for no particular reason. Is it for health? Because I certainly don't feel healthy. Strong maybe, but not healthy. I feel like garbage pretty much all the time.
Are you saying you have 2 workouts that are 3 hours each or the two combined add up to 3 hours? Because if he has you working out for 3 hours you need to drop him IMMEDIATELY, take a full week or two off, and find a new program.

Most programs are in the 30-60 minute range, the longest i've seen is 90.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,893
Are you saying you have 2 workouts that are 3 hours each or the two combined add up to 3 hours? Because if he has you working out for 3 hours you need to drop him IMMEDIATELY, take a full week or two off, and find a new program.

Most programs are in the 30-60 minute range, the longest i've seen is 90.
My first two days are taking three hours each and the other three days are around two hours each. It's powerlifting so usually 5 minutes between sets, but still... it's a lot. One of the other regulars who competes on a national level said it's too much work and that definitely made me raise an eyebrow. This guy is a couple steps short of being a pro with sponsorships and he's saying I'm being overworked... that can't be good.

Another part of me is worried I'm just babying myself.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,320
My first two days are taking three hours each and the other three days are around two hours each. It's powerlifting so usually 5 minutes between sets, but still... it's a lot. One of the other regulars who competes on a national level said it's too much work and that definitely made me raise an eyebrow. This guy is a couple steps short of being a pro with sponsorships and he's saying I'm being overworked... that can't be good.

Another part of me is worried I'm just babying myself.
Over training is a very real thing. I would just change based on your results of how you feel. Also, make sure your diet is up to snuff.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,893
Over training is a very real thing. I would just change based on your results of how you feel. Also, make sure your diet is up to snuff.
My diet is awful. It's almost as if it's a "dirty cut". It could be so much better.

I forgot to mention have simultaneous goals right now that are conflicting and I need to choose one and stick to it. On one hand I'm cutting weight (down to 220, started at 280), and on the other I'm trying to build toward a 600lb deadlift by the end of the year. I'm not sure why I set an arbitrary goal for the deadlift... it honestly might just be peer pressure from the regulars, but I think I'm past that beginner point where I can build lifts up massively while still losing weight. I'm just not feeling right... ever. Like the energy required to lift the weight is simply not there.

Thanks for the replies. I feel guilty because I'm using this place as support while never giving back. I'll try to change that.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,320
My diet is awful. It's almost as if it's a "dirty cut". It could be so much better.

I forgot to mention have simultaneous goals right now that are conflicting and I need to choose one and stick to it. On one hand I'm cutting weight (down to 220, started at 280), and on the other I'm trying to build toward a 600lb deadlift by the end of the year. I'm not sure why I set an arbitrary goal for the deadlift... it honestly might just be peer pressure from the regulars, but I think I'm past that beginner point where I can build lifts up massively while still losing weight. I'm just not feeling right... ever. Like the energy required to lift the weight is simply not there.

Thanks for the replies. I feel guilty because I'm using this place as support while never giving back. I'll try to change that.
You can definitely cut and build muscle if that is your goal. Make sure you eat enough protein but overall you should still be at a caloric deficit. 600lb deadlift seems insane to me. But I am a noob when it comes to deadlifting. I do not deadlift even my own weight yet, although I am getting close.

I think you need to objectively examine your lifestyle. Diet, hydration, sleep are probably more important than hitting the gym. If these things are off, it can severely affect you. And wrapped in diet is minerals. Magnesium is important and it is easy to be magnesium deficient. Magnesium deficiency can lead to all sorts of issues, because it is a mineral that helps other minerals be absorbed. Sodium is also super important. Try ingesting like 1/4 teaspoon of salt before working out (salt is not nearly as bad as people are lead to believe). I take a bit of redmond real salt (or pink himalayan salt) since they are unrefined without any additives and have a mix of other minerals. There is so much to minerals and I am no expert myself. These are the main two that I focus on. I get plenty of potassium from my diet though, or at least hopefully enough. I also get some calcium and vitamin D from supplements aimed mostly at magnesium.
 

jvalioli

Member
Oct 27, 2017
202
My first two days are taking three hours each and the other three days are around two hours each. It's powerlifting so usually 5 minutes between sets, but still... it's a lot. One of the other regulars who competes on a national level said it's too much work and that definitely made me raise an eyebrow. This guy is a couple steps short of being a pro with sponsorships and he's saying I'm being overworked... that can't be good.

Another part of me is worried I'm just babying myself.
It is not uncommon for powerlifting training to take a long time. Mine are pretty close to 3 hrs/5days. Some top level athletes will only do 45min/4days. It really depends on the recovery ability of the athlete.

I remember your previous posts. Honestly, I don't think training advice is what you need right now. No one can help you if you don't truly know what you want.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,320
So my experience with the hex bar was.... great. I feel like my form was better, less lower back pain, grip was better, balance was better, lifted more (was 135lbs doing 6 reps, hex bar had my third set doing 170lbs with 8 reps), and just overall felt less dreadful than the conventional deadlift.

Now if I could only find a magic bullet for pull up progression. To be fair I am inconsistent here because I switch my grip positions and between chin ups and pull ups. I do weight assisted though, at 40 lbs so 40 lbs off my bodyweight. And I have tried 25 lbs, the next weight progression, to poor-ish results... like 5 max. But at 40 they are becoming easy to chin up and they are only a little harder to pull up. I do not think there is a magic bullet and I do not think of the hex bar as a magic bullet, just the right fit for me. But it would be nice to figure out the pull up and do them completely unassisted, but I am likely just going to have to progress the way I am right now.

I feel like I am doing good in every other category. I need to work on my running more but as far as strength training goes, things feel good at the moment. Week 5 done. I think I may add back HIIT training next week, once a week.

Oh, and a weight update, things are definitely moving on the scale again. The whoosh is real.
 

Tuorom

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,076
Hey I posted a couple weeks ago talking about how I was sure what I wanted out of lifting, and it's actually gotten worse.

First of all, I started getting really bad tennis elbow, to the point that I took a week off. I only lifted once this week and it mostly felt fine, but I'm not feeling that consistent drive anymore. I decided I never want to compete in powerlifting, and now I'm not sure why I'm still training mostly powerlifting. I have a coach and I'm wondering if I even need him. He gives me pretty brutal programming; actually his programming has been too brutal as of late. It's probably why I'm burning out. Two of my five days are up to three hours of work, with TONS of volume on the compounds. I'm not sure why he's suddenly pushing me so hard. I never looked into programming on my own because this guy has literally been my coach from day one. He took me from barely being able to box squat 20 pounds to somewhat respectable numbers in less than a year and a half. No joke, before I met him I was completely fucked... almost immobile for YEARS. He transformed my life... I can't deny that.

Man this is more rambly than I expected, but the bottom line is this: I lost track of what my goals are; essentially I'm lost. I have no idea where to go from here.

I just know there's a (shallow) part of me that wants to "look strong". Like nobody has once commented that I look like I lift weights, even though I'm far stronger than the average person. I might need to shed this idea because it's inherently unhealthy.

All I know is it feels weird to lift for no particular reason. Is it for health? Because I certainly don't feel healthy. Strong maybe, but not healthy. I feel like garbage pretty much all the time.
First I would say to rest your elbow until that problem is gone. It doesn't make sense to train injured.

Second you do a lot of work for something you don't want to do. It sounds like you already know the answer to this one. If you don't want a coach anymore then I'd get rid of him. Doesn't mean you don't appreciate him but you won't stay with one coach forever.

Third take some time to discover what you want your goal to be, and then go from there (maybe even take a break from the gym). Keep it to one goal. It's way easier because you always know exactly what you're going for.
Come back to the gym refreshed and knowing exactly what you want out of it.

So my experience with the hex bar was.... great. I feel like my form was better, less lower back pain, grip was better, balance was better, lifted more (was 135lbs doing 6 reps, hex bar had my third set doing 170lbs with 8 reps), and just overall felt less dreadful than the conventional deadlift.

Now if I could only find a magic bullet for pull up progression. To be fair I am inconsistent here because I switch my grip positions and between chin ups and pull ups. I do weight assisted though, at 40 lbs so 40 lbs off my bodyweight. And I have tried 25 lbs, the next weight progression, to poor-ish results... like 5 max. But at 40 they are becoming easy to chin up and they are only a little harder to pull up. I do not think there is a magic bullet and I do not think of the hex bar as a magic bullet, just the right fit for me. But it would be nice to figure out the pull up and do them completely unassisted, but I am likely just going to have to progress the way I am right now.

I feel like I am doing good in every other category. I need to work on my running more but as far as strength training goes, things feel good at the moment. Week 5 done. I think I may add back HIIT training next week, once a week.

Oh, and a weight update, things are definitely moving on the scale again. The whoosh is real.
Glad to hear it's feels good for you!

Have you tired doing pull up negatives? Starting at the top and descending s l o w l y, maybe even throwing some pauses in there if you can.
Also try out just doing hangs for time. Keep your shoulders retracted and depressed and hold it. You'll be amazed at what a difference a strong grip will give (better transfer of energy).
Also try out the inverse row!


Pull ups are a bit of a bitch because you kinda just have to make the jump. Just keep practicing, keep at it and eventually you will get it.

Very nice! Those lats are huge.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,893
Thanks for the replies dudes. I sent my coach a message basically saying what I said here (not as long winded), so we'll see what he suggests. I have made up my mind that competitive powerlifitng is out. It was always a shaky goal and I was more being pushed in that direction by my gym (where nearly everyone competes), but I know it's not for me.

Edit: Alright I talked to him and he was actually pretty excited to shift me over to more of a powerbuilding style of training, which honestly sounds like something I'd really enjoy. I still get to lift heavy but now I can focus on getting bigger as well.
 
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jvalioli

Member
Oct 27, 2017
202
My injury is almost rehabbed away so I did a heavier deadlift session today after 3 months off. Looks like I lost 60lbs off my deadlift. It sucks but I hope I come back pretty quickly. Haven't tested squats yet but I don't think I'll lose as much there.
 
Oct 25, 2017
202
You can definitely cut and build muscle if that is your goal. Make sure you eat enough protein but overall you should still be at a caloric deficit. 600lb deadlift seems insane to me. But I am a noob when it comes to deadlifting. I do not deadlift even my own weight yet, although I am getting close.
I would be wary of losing weight and building muscle at the same time unless you are a noob to lifting, coming back from an extended break (months) or just way heavier and slightly overweight.

body recomps don’t work for everyone as they can be slow for those not in the most optimal scenarios.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,320
I would be wary of losing weight and building muscle at the same time unless you are a noob to lifting, coming back from an extended break (months) or just way heavier and slightly overweight.

body recomps don’t work for everyone as they can be slow for those not in the most optimal scenarios.
I feel like there are a lot of factors at play, but people used to think you cannot cut fat and build muscle. While you technically cannot cut fat and build muscle at literally the same second, you can over time throughout the day. You definitely will get better results with more fat on your body, which presumably you have if you are cutting. At the end of the day it is about priorities. But I would take advantage of the opportunity (and am) if available.
 

TheKid

Member
Oct 25, 2017
228
Bay Area
Started doing stronglifts 5 x 5 about a month and half ago, started pretty much at 45 across the board except for deadlifts since I wanted to focus on posture, I'm now at a spot in which I'm not dead after working out so I started incorporating a 2 mile run after each session. Should I run before or after the work out?
 

jvalioli

Member
Oct 27, 2017
202
Started doing stronglifts 5 x 5 about a month and half ago, started pretty much at 45 across the board except for deadlifts since I wanted to focus on posture, I'm now at a spot in which I'm not dead after working out so I started incorporating a 2 mile run after each session. Should I run before or after the work out?
What are your goals? I don't know your experience level with running but 2 miles after each SL session seems like a lot especially when the weight actually gets heavy. Consider running on your off days instead.