Five paintings allegedly by Adolf Hitler to be auctioned in Nuremberg

Peralta99

Alt-Account
Member
Feb 2, 2019
74
Echoing what others have said, these should be in a museum.


Something about some rich dude paying for these to sit in a private collection is distasteful.
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,095
If they must continue to exist, they belong in a museum.
They belong in a museum
Nope, disagree. Put them in a museum. You don't burn history.
Fully agree with this. It says something about the human condition that a monster like Hitler could create such pleasant landscape paintings.
Despite the disgusting person that Hitler was, this items are pieces of history. They should belong in a museum because of that.
There nice paintings even if they were done by Hitler. They do belong to a museum. They are a part of history and there a reminder that external events broke him and turned him evil.
This. Don't destroy works of historical significance, but shit like this belongs in a museum, not some neonazi's parlor
Museum and teach about the horrors the author did in life so we may learn from it.
put them in a museum juxtaposed next to the atrocities he commited
Museum. You don't burn history.

Should be a poll it looks like.
That belongs in a museum
Echoing what others have said, these should be in a museum.


Something about some rich dude paying for these to sit in a private collection is distasteful.





 
Oct 27, 2017
5,786
There nice paintings even if they were done by Hitler. They do belong to a museum. They are a part of history and there a reminder that external events broke him and turned him evil.
They're not nice. They're terrible. They belong in a museum because Hitler made them. Guy was denied at artschool. He couldn't paint for shit.
 
Oct 26, 2017
4,846

The Guardian: Artworks allegedly by Adolf Hitler fail to sell at Nuremberg auction
Five paintings attributed to Adolf Hitler have failed to find buyers at an auction held amid anger at the sale of Nazi memorabilia.
High starting prices of between €19,000 and €45,000 ($21,000 and $50,000), and lingering suspicions about the authenticity of the artworks were thought to have scared off potential buyers at Saturday’s auction in Nuremberg.
The Weidler auction house did not comment on the reasons for the failure but said the paintings could yet be sold at a later date.
Nuremberg’s mayor, Ulrich Maly, had earlier condemned the sale as being “in bad taste”.
Among the items that failed to sell were a mountain lake view and a painting of a wicker armchair with a swastika symbol presumed to have belonged to the late Nazi dictator.
The Weidler auction house held the “special sale” in Nuremberg, the city in which Nazi war criminals were tried in 1945.
Days before the sale a number of the artworks were withdrawn on suspicion they were fakes, with prosecutors stepping in.
Sales of alleged artworks by Hitler – who for a time tried to make a living as an artist in his native Austria – regularly spark outrage that collectors are willing to pay high prices for art linked to the country’s Nazi past.
According to Stephan Klingen of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich, Hitler had the style of “a moderately ambitious amateur” but his creations did not stand out from “hundreds of thousands” of comparable works from the period – making their authenticity especially hard to verify.
 
Oct 25, 2017
883

The Guardian: Artworks allegedly by Adolf Hitler fail to sell at Nuremberg auction
Five paintings attributed to Adolf Hitler have failed to find buyers at an auction held amid anger at the sale of Nazi memorabilia.
High starting prices of between €19,000 and €45,000 ($21,000 and $50,000), and lingering suspicions about the authenticity of the artworks were thought to have scared off potential buyers at Saturday’s auction in Nuremberg.
The Weidler auction house did not comment on the reasons for the failure but said the paintings could yet be sold at a later date.
Nuremberg’s mayor, Ulrich Maly, had earlier condemned the sale as being “in bad taste”.
Among the items that failed to sell were a mountain lake view and a painting of a wicker armchair with a swastika symbol presumed to have belonged to the late Nazi dictator.
The Weidler auction house held the “special sale” in Nuremberg, the city in which Nazi war criminals were tried in 1945.
Days before the sale a number of the artworks were withdrawn on suspicion they were fakes, with prosecutors stepping in.
Sales of alleged artworks by Hitler – who for a time tried to make a living as an artist in his native Austria – regularly spark outrage that collectors are willing to pay high prices for art linked to the country’s Nazi past.
According to Stephan Klingen of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich, Hitler had the style of “a moderately ambitious amateur” but his creations did not stand out from “hundreds of thousands” of comparable works from the period – making their authenticity especially hard to verify.
The article is contradicting its own headline. If prosecutors seized the paintings, no wonder they didn't find any buyers. That's also what can be read on German news -- they're seized, so they weren't actually part of the auction. Additionally, the auction house plans to sell them once their authenticity has been proven.
 
There is nothing wrong with preserving history, because the purpose of it is not now, but 200, 300, etc years in the future.

The problem here is the auctioning for profit to private collections because that is simply purchasing of Nazi memorabilia. It should be done to a museum and funds gone into charity or funds for a museum.
 
Oct 25, 2017
11,851
There is nothing wrong with preserving history, because the purpose of it is not now, but 200, 300, etc years in the future.

The problem here is the auctioning for profit to private collections because that is simply purchasing of Nazi memorabilia. It should be done to a museum and funds gone into charity or funds for a museum.
We exist in a generation who are convinced they will all be dead in "5~10 years". Trying to convince most people there is worth in ethical preservation for 100~300 years time is largely falling on deaf ears when instead they want to tell you they retweeted some great take about how nuclear war is imminent and planet earth won't be here within their lifetime.
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,191
Wisconsin
As expected, no one wants to spend money on something with such dubious provenance, they'll have to get it under control before trying to sell any again.
The article is contradicting its own headline. If prosecutors seized the paintings, no wonder they didn't find any buyers. That's also what can be read on German news -- they're seized, so they weren't actually part of the auction. Additionally, the auction house plans to sell them once their authenticity has been proven.
That's not quite correct, as far as I can tell looking at English and some German sources, 5 paintings were not withdrawn and failed to receive any bids in the auction. The other 26 were seized and removed from the auction.
 
Nov 10, 2017
1,266
They should be stuffed into a cellar and forgotten about until the last Nazi cultists are gone. The prison that held the Nuremberg trial convicts was a historical building but it was still demolished in order to deny the cultists a place to worship.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,567
London
We can learn so much about genocidal maniacs* by studying these pictures, why weren't they snapped up.

*Possibly painted by some old lady who owned a sweet shop or something.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,059
They belong in a museum and, if there's an exhibit, charge a fee that I'm sure could go towards some sort of Holocaust related charity it could be donated to.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,514
They're not nice. They're terrible. They belong in a museum because Hitler made them. Guy was denied at artschool. He couldn't paint for shit.
Lmao, come on now. They're technically sound, if a little boring. Anyways, it doesn't really matter now that the provenance is unclear.
 
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Jan 4, 2018
180
I agree with the people saying this should be in a museum, not a "look at these marvelous paintings"-museum but one that explores the dark sides of humanity and nazi germany. You don't destroy history, you keep it so that future generations can learn from it and not make the same mistakes. A painting by one of the most evil men to ever live is a leap into the mind of someone (hopefully) not like yourself. To see that a man that committed such atrocities could paint a quiet landscape painting promotes reflection, and enforces the knowledge that not all evil is immediately apparent, and that most evil people had a life and motivations, even though they were horrible. Frankly it scares me that people would be willing to burn historical artifacts, no matter how evil the person that made them. That's not how you learn from history.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,567
London
I agree with the people saying this should be in a museum, not a "look at these marvelous paintings"-museum but one that explores the dark sides of humanity and nazi germany. You don't destroy history, you keep it so that future generations can learn from it and not make the same mistakes. A painting by one of the most evil men to ever live is a leap into the mind of someone (hopefully) not like yourself. To see that a man that committed such atrocities could paint a quiet landscape painting promotes reflection, and enforces the knowledge that not all evil is immediately apparent, and that most evil people had a life and motivations, even though they were horrible. Frankly it scares me that people would be willing to burn historical artifacts, no matter how evil the person that made them. That's not how you learn from history.
I was only kinda joking that these could have been painted by a sweet old lady, but they could have been painted by any old Tom, Dick or Harry, they are worthless.

If people want to see into the mind of a madman then visit Auschwitz, not gawp at seaside resort level tat.
 
Jan 4, 2018
180
I was only kinda joking that these could have been painted by a sweet old lady, but they could have been painted by any old Tom, Dick or Harry, they are worthless.

If people want to see into the mind of a madman then visit Auschwitz, not gawp at seaside resort level tat.
I agree that visiting a concentration camp is a much better way to understand the atrocities committed by nazi germany. The fact remains however that Hitler is a historical figure and I feel that makes these paintings worth preserving. If we found a clay pot made by Julius Caesar or a sweater knitted by General Custer I would feel the same. You don't give those people agency by letting the world see this stuff, you remind it of the inherent evil that will always be present in us as humans.
 
Oct 27, 2017
198
Sorry for the offtopic question but why does Nürnberg get changed to Nuremberg?
The change in pronunciation sounds weird, for example Sachsen-Saxony, seems (more) reasonable right?