Fruit juice may raise risk of cancer, study finds

Raccoon

Member
May 31, 2019
396
Yes. These studies are meant to help us make healthier choices, but they instead appear to engender apathy and reinforce unhealthy behavior because people think that “everything causes cancer.”

As OP said, just drink water. Is that so hard?
a word of advice, you’re being too straightforward for your username. try to be a little more acerbic and weird when you post. for instance, I personally like to add SCREEEREETETETEEEE sounds to my posts sometimes, to remind everyone that I’m a raccoon

on topic, yeah everybody should drink water, that’s pretty much the only “new” “takeaway” from this “study.” I mean, the article is literally “sugar is bad,” everybody ought to know this
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,696
It ain't hard to understand. Processing/Refining foods in ways that strips them of certain nutrients and concentrates others causes ill health.

"Eat whole foods. Not too much. Mostly plants." Words to live well and long by.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,063
Yes. These studies are meant to help us make healthier choices, but they instead appear to engender apathy and reinforce unhealthy behavior because people think that “everything causes cancer.”
I think the studies are well intended to help us make healthier choices... But almost all of these studies are filtered through a lens of reporting, and then filtered again through a lens of social media / link sharing / etc... To the point that the original message gets distorted into something alarmist, and extreme, and then concluded with something that the original study never concluded with ... e.g., "Just drink water."

"Excessive consumption of sugary drinks – including juice – associated with cancer" ->

"Study finds sugar in fruit juice may raise risk of cancer" ->

"Study finds fruit juice may raise risk of cancer" ->

"Juice causes cancer" ->

"Just drink water"

...

We gradually distill these studies down into messages that the studies themselves never suggest. It's not nefariously motivated but there's some innate desire to boil everything down into an easy to understand, but not scientifically endorsed, message.
 

Zefah

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
5,890
I think the studies are well intended to help us make healthier choices... But almost all of these studies are filtered through a lens of reporting, and then filtered again through a lens of social media / link sharing / etc... To the point that the original message gets distorted into something alarmist, and extreme, and then concluded with something that the original study never concluded with ... e.g., "Just drink water."

"Excessive consumption of sugary drinks – including juice – associated with cancer" ->

"Study finds sugar in fruit juice may raise risk of cancer" ->

"Study finds fruit juice may raise risk of cancer" ->

"Juice causes cancer" ->

"Just drink water"

...

We gradually distill these studies down into messages that the studies themselves never suggest. It's not nefariously motivated but there's some innate desire to boil everything down into an easy to understand, but not scientifically endorsed, message.
Pretty much. You start with "too much sugar consumption will make you fat, which is a known risk factor in developing cancer" and eventually your headline becomes "Fruit juice, specifically, leads to cancer development!"
 

Dingens

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,967
when they say fruit juice, are they talking about "fruit juice" like fanta? otherwise, whouldn't this also mean that eating fruits causes cancer as well?
 

KojiKnight

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,483
It's really really simple you guys... Sugar is bad, sugar is killing you, reduce the amount of sugar you consume. Juice is just a headline clickbait title when it really is as simple as "Sugar = bad".

when they say fruit juice, are they talking about "fruit juice" like fanta? otherwise, whouldn't this also mean that eating fruits causes cancer as well?
Fruit juices are almost always sweetened, and even those that aren't, are concentrated and remove all of the healthy pulp/food part. An apple is infinitely better for you than apple juice.
 

nekkid

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,586
I’ve largely checked out on this stuff, now. It’s either incredibly difficult or just depressing to avoid all food that we’re told gives you a higher chance of cancer.

Just do everything in moderation, like a good diet should have.
 

KojiKnight

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,483
Pretty sure at this point they can work up a study to make it show that virtually anything will give you cancer.
This is a weak and anti-intellectual statement. It's how anti-vaxxers and 'truthers' justify ignoring facts.

I get that a lot of people are being hyperbolic, but again... nearly every one of these "X food will give you cancer" statements has to do with sugar, and avoiding too much of it which is something everyone should be aware of at this point in their lives.
 

Wein Cruz

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,239
It was just a flippant comment. don't take it too seriously buddy.

Chugging copious amounts of sugary drinks is obviously not good for you.
 

mutantmagnet

Member
Oct 28, 2017
7,532
SO does the article actually mention the degree it causes cancer? Like it takes cooking Vegetable oil over 15 minutes to become an actual risk factor for cancer while olive oil needs to be cooking for over 40 minutes to be come a risk factor.

Without menttioning the degrees the article is useless and we would have to read the study if we even can since they are usually paywalled.
 

KojiKnight

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,483
SO does the article actually mention the degree it causes cancer? Like it takes cooking Vegetable oil over 15 minutes to become an actual risk factor for cancer while olive oil needs to be cooking for over 40 minutes to be come a risk factor.

Without menttioning the degrees the article is useless and we would have to read the study if we even can since they are usually paywalled.

The harvard research that most of these articles is based on. That's the easy version to digest, the original studies are available if you look around as well if you want to get into the nitty gritty.
 

Thewonandonly

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,504
Utah
Fuck and here I am just learning that caprisun is a great substitute for soda so I can lay off of that... and now I’m going to get cancer from it 😞 I’m just trying to be healthy
 

Nemesis121

Member
Nov 3, 2017
3,597
All these studies point too every thing we eat increases cancer risk, my father died from prostate cancer, my future is bright :(
 

Airegin

Member
Dec 10, 2017
1,962
I was surprised to learn recently that high sugar consumption doesn't raise the risk of developing diabetes, being overweight does. So if you're skinny and eat tons of sugar it won't cause diabetes.

Wonder if the same applies here.
 

RestEerie

Member
Aug 20, 2018
5,335
NEWS FLASH: BEING ALIVE INCREASES CHANCE OF GETTING CANCER!!! STUDIES SHOWS BEING DEAD IS THE ABSOLUTE WAY OF BEING CANCER FREE.
 

Titik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,410
All the nutrients and good stuff in fruits are all the dry stuff in it. The fiber, antioxidants, etc. The juice is just literal fructose water with some sprinkles of nutrients.

Eat whole fruits, people.
 

mutantmagnet

Member
Oct 28, 2017
7,532

The harvard research that most of these articles is based on. That's the easy version to digest, the original studies are available if you look around as well if you want to get into the nitty gritty.
That's cool thanks.

I already see an important distinction I wasn't grasping before.

Sugary drinks (also categorized as sugar-sweetened beverages or “soft” drinks) refer to any beverage with added sugar or other sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, fruit juice concentrates, and more). This includes soda, pop, cola, tonic, fruit punch, lemonade (and other “ades”), sweetened powdered drinks, as well as sports and energy drinks.
Initially thought this included natural drinks. Now I wonder how my homemade lemonade stacks up.
 

eXistor

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,019
The keyword being "excessive". Anything in excess is bad for you, that's what that means.

Hell, drinking excessive amounts of water can kill people. Just don't overdo it and you're fine.