Fruit juice may raise risk of cancer, study finds

Jun 10, 2018
1,518
Veganism is linked to lower bone density and higher risk of fractures....

Literally everything any diet, food, drink, lifestyle will be linked to some risk. Its about being sensible and making balanced choices.

Ultimately if fruit juice raises your cancer risk then so does fruit. And higher sugar vegetables. Eating an orange means ingesting the same amount of sugar as drinking one squeezed.
This post exemplifies why we need more education on nutrition, because otherwise such a comment wouldn't be made with an understanding of how fiber plays a significant role (which is in fruit - not fruit juices) in decreasing the absorption rate of sugar.
 

Zappy

Member
Nov 2, 2017
3,172
This post exemplifies why we need more education on nutrition, because otherwise such a comment wouldn't be made with an understanding of how fiber plays a significant role (which is in fruit - not fruit juices) in decreasing the absorption rate of sugar.
Yes - it decreases the absorption rate which is important for diabetics and why they are told to eat whole fruit rather than drink juice or at worst drink fresh juice with pulp if they absolutely have to - but it does not decrease the total amount of sugar absorbed.

So if you drink juice of one orange or eat an orange you get the same amount of sugar regardless. Yes it is absorbed at different rates. But the link does not necessarily have anything to do with the blood sugar response.

Secondly my point still stands - if drinking juice raises your risk of cancer then so does eating fruit. It may be that studies will show that one raises the risk more - but the risk will still be raised by any sugar consumption. Juice is not a magic thing. Its simply sugar, water, vitamins, minerals and natural compounds...that's it. The same things you get in fruit and veg.
 
Jun 10, 2018
1,518
Yes - it decreases the absorption rate which is important for diabetics and why they are told to eat whole fruit rather than drink juice or at worst drink fresh juice with pulp if they absolutely have to - but it does not decrease the total amount of sugar absorbed.

So if you drink juice of one orange or eat an orange you get the same amount of sugar regardless. Yes it is absorbed at different rates. But the link does not necessarily have anything to do with the blood sugar response.

Secondly my point still stands - if drinking juice raises your risk of cancer then so does eating fruit. It may be that studies will show that one raises the risk more - but the risk will still be raised by any sugar consumption. Juice is not a magic thing. Its simply sugar, water, vitamins, minerals and natural compounds...that's it. The same things you get in fruit and veg.
....except for the fact that juice (especially pasteurized juice which in the process of heating out the contaminants also destroys all of the vitamins/minerals within) doesn't contain anywhere near the same quantity of those essentials as a piece of fruit of would. Not to mention the satiation factors of fiber which means you will be fuller eating two apples rather than ingesting the juice from two. Not to mention also, pending on if the person is living a largely lethargic lifestyle, the delayed effect fiber has on the absorption of sugar means that you give your body the chance to burn it off in the TCA cycle rather than have it flow in your bloodstream and feed tumorous cells.

So yeah, I also stand by my point I don't follow your conclusion eating fruit causes you to be at risk of developing cancer.
 
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Skade

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,859
I think we've reached the point where we found out that about anything you eat or not can raise the risks of cancer so... Yeah...

I'll keep my fruits and their juices, thank you.
 

AlwaysSalty

The Fallen
Nov 12, 2017
785
It’s the sugar, everything with sugar is killing you. There’s no spinning with calories in calories out bullshit. Stop consuming sugar and you’ll feel way better. Obesity and diabetes weren’t even a big deal until the fda recommended the low fat high carb diet in the 70s. Stats back it up, but people keep spouting that bs. Carbs are addictive and burn out quick, so making it your main source of energy is setting yourself up for failure.
 

Zappy

Member
Nov 2, 2017
3,172
....except for the fact that juice (especially pasteurized juice which in the process of heating out the contaminants also destroys all of the vitamins/minerals within) doesn't contain anywhere near the same quantity of those essentials as a piece of fruit of would. Not to mention the satiation factors of fiber which means you will be fuller eating two apples rather than ingesting the juice from two. Not to mention also, pending on if the person is living a largely lethargic lifestyle, the delayed effect fiber has on the absorption of sugar means that you give your body the chance to burn it off in the TCA cycle rather than have it flow in your bloodstream and feed tumorous cells.

So yeah, I also stand by my point I don't follow your conclusion eating fruit causes you to be at risk of developing cancer.
Firstly you are arguing about a link between unhealthy lifestyles, high blood sugar and implicit weight gain as being a cancer risk - which we know it is.

But this particular study says there is a direct link between consumption of sugary drinks and cancer. Irrespective of weight.

What that means is that the issue is sugar. And whilst eating fruit is better for you that drinking juice IF (and its a big IF) there is a link between natural sugars and cancer then it won't matter whether you eat or drink the fruit (other than as you say you likely consume less by eating).

My point was simply that in moderation juice is fine. As is fruit. As is everything. In moderation and within a lifestyle balance.
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,646
Not drinking juice also causes cancer.
There is a baseline risk of getting a number of different cancers, this risk varies by a number of factors (for example age).

In addition to that there is a number of other risk factors such as lifestyle based risk factors that add on to that, one of those is nutrition.
 
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OP
OP
Lonely1

Lonely1

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,854
Firstly you are arguing about a link between unhealthy lifestyles, high blood sugar and implicit weight gain as being a cancer risk - which we know it is.

But this particular study says there is a direct link between consumption of sugary drinks and cancer. Irrespective of weight.

What that means is that the issue is sugar. And whilst eating fruit is better for you that drinking juice IF (and its a big IF) there is a link between natural sugars and cancer then it won't matter whether you eat or drink the fruit (other than as you say you likely consume less by eating).

My point was simply that in moderation juice is fine. As is fruit. As is everything. In moderation and within a lifestyle balance.
How many oranges you need to squeeze to get a glass of juice? That's your answer.
 

Firaga

Member
Oct 29, 2017
665
The research only shows correlation. It also takes into consideration about how people that drinks sugary stuff might have other habits that might skew the result.