Gaming on Linux 2019 | A GNU Era of Gaming

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152

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This thread is for discussing gaming on Linux. Why would you do it? What games are being released? Recommended games, etc.

My personal intention is not for this to be a technical thread, and instead be a friendly community just talking about Linux games and introducing people to life outside Windows. Linux veterans are welcome, but the OP is going to be pretty basic. If you would like to contribute with recommendations or fixes please do so.

Right now, this is a big work in progress. Please keep that in mind. I just thought something like this would be useful.
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FAQ

I heard about these things called "Distros" but there are so many of them. Where to start?
Almost any distribution is fine, but most people recommend starting with Ubuntu or Linux Mint. They are very easy to get started with, have painless installation of drivers (AMD users: some more information will come later), and Ubuntu is usually the only distro with "official" support by large third parties. This includes Steam, who officially only support SteamOS and Ubuntu.

Can you really game on Linux? I thought nobody supported it.
Years ago you might have been correct! These days, thanks to Valve's work on SteamOS, DirectX to OpenGL wrappers, better driver support, and wider Linux support by engines such as Unity and Unreal, Linux support is better than ever! At the time of writing, 11125 of 48651 games on Steam have native Linux support, and these include many popular games like Rocket League, Dota 2, Football Manager, CS:GO, and Total War.

Of those that do not natively support Linux, many of them run through Wine! Wine is a compatibility layer which enables you to play Windows games. It has been around for many years with patchy compatibility, but these days is a viable option for quite a few games. This is part down to improved support in Wine itself, and partially down to something called DXVK - which converts Windows Direct X 11 commands to Vulkan. Using this, games like Witcher 3 can run much better under Linux than they otherwise would be able to.

This has all lead to one big project (announced after I wrote this long OP!) - Proton, by Valve. Proton is a modified Wine which incorporates a lot of the technology used by DXVK, and comes included with Steam on Linux through their new Steam Play service. Currently this is in beta, but promises to make things much easier to run, and improve compatibility. The announcement is here: https://steamcommunity.com/games/221410/announcements/detail/1696055855739350561

If you would like to find out how many games you have could run on Linux,https://lgc.lysioneer.nl/ is a great starting point. Note it needs your games on Steam to be public before it will work. My library is estimated at around 61% supported by Linux, which I don't believe is bad at all considering I game on both Linux and Windows and have not made any special attempts to only buy Linux games. LGC currently does not check for Proton/Steam Play support. To see if a game has Proton support please check here: http://protondb.com

You mentioned Wine, but it's difficult to set up. Is there something easier?

Proton/Steam Play. This should be the first place you look whenever trying to get a Windows game working. It is relatively painless as a lot of the legwork has already been done for you, games are launched straight through Steam without any third party programs, and the compatibility is fairly good.

By default however, only a select few whitelisted titles are enabled. To enable it for all games you must first change a single setting. It can be found in Steam under Settings -> Steam Play -> Enable Steam Play for all titles. You'll also notice an option for choosing different Proton versions. Valve recommends using the latest Beta, but your mileage might vary.

Before Proton there was Lutris. Lutris is still a viable option as a general game launcher, and GOG support is planned so it could soon also be useful for that (update: GOG support is now added in V0.5.0) . In addition, you might come across a game which works with a certain build of Wine and DXVK but not Proton, Lutris is probably your best bet for that but those games are extremely rare.

What about drivers? You mentioned earlier something about AMD in particular
Drivers mostly just work! On Linux, drivers for most things come included in the kernel. However, if you are on Nvidia GPU you will want to install Nvidia's drivers. The easiest way if you are on Ubuntu go into your start menu, find “Software and Updates” -> “Additional Drivers" and install the official proprietary drivers. Unfortunately doing is this way will give you slightly out of date drivers which are not optimal for games. I fully recommend adding the official repository which can be done in the terminal by copy pasting these commands:

Code:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/ppa
sudo apt-get update
Going into additional drivers will now give you access to the nvidia-415 driver which is recommended, along with the 396 and 410 drivers.

If you plan on using Proton a lot, you might want to use the Vulkan beta branch. Currently, this is the only branch with access to Stream output support, which fixes a bunch of problems:

Code:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/dev
sudo apt-get update
If you had the 396 drivers already installed, this will automatically update them to the dev version. If you didn't then you can select the 396 drivers as before.

UPDATE: As of Nvidia 415.22 - Vulkan Transform feedback has made it to the stable branch. Please use that over the dev driver.

For AMD users, you are in luck. AMD have amazing open source driver support, so there's usually no need for you to install proprietary drivers like with Nvidia. This means that you'll probably not even need to do anything to get games running well on your system. Unfortunately, last time I checked, *buntu ships with a version of MESA which is a little out of date and the performance isn't quite on par with the latest version. If you don't get satisfactory performance on your card, you'll want to get a newer version of MESA. It even supports old cards, so if you are on early GCN cards, or maybe even Pre-GCN, rejoice!

How do I install software?
Most Linux distributions come with their own "app store" of sorts. Under Ubuntu, this will simply be under "Software" in your start menu. In Linux terms, this is your package manager.

Under the hood, this package manager is actually just fetching software from an online repository, and like most things in Linux, there is a command line option too! Under Ubuntu, this is apt, in Fedora you'll find something called "yum". To install a piece of software you can simply type "sudo apt install" followed by the name of the program you want. If you don't know the name, "sudo apt-cache search", if you want to uninstall "sudo apt remove" will do it for you.

You can do all these things with the GUI too, but many Linux users will prefer the former because it's usually faster. It's always recommended to use your package manager.

I'm so used to just downloading .exe files. Anything like that?
It's always recommended to use your package manager. It's much more secure than installing a random executable from an unknown source.

However, if that's not possible, most distros will have support for installing from a downloaded executable! Not .exe though. In Ubuntu, Debian, or Linux Mint, .deb is the extension you want. Some pieces of software often need to be installed this way.

I was told I would need to build everything from source?
Then you were told incorrectly. Most users will quite literally never be doing this. Only developers, or people trying to use bleeding edge git versions of certain programs should bother. This is no different to Windows.

Why Game On Linux?

Glad you asked! Here are a few reasons why someone might choose to make this decision:
  • Freedom to control system updates and background processes, so you have more control over what runs on your system.
  • Concerns over data analytics, and the effects it has on personal privacy. The issues with telemetry in Windows is particularly well known, but this is much less of a thing in Linux (although Canonical have tried it in the past, if it becomes a thing it is very easy to switch to a distro which doesn't.)
  • Completely customisable. Don't like the start menu in Windows? Sure you can use a replacement like Classic Shell. On Linux however, you can change the behaviour and layout of essentially everything on your system. Don't like how Gnome looks? You can change it or install KDE or Xfce instead! Don't like the default colours or window borders? You can change them! And for the most part this is a painless process, unlike the many hoops you need to jump through to get anything on Windows to change.
  • Concerns about the increasingly "closed" nature of Windows. With Microsoft trying to push users onto the windows store, UWP, etc. Supporting a fundamentally open platform like Linux helps ensure that you don't need to deal with that future.
  • Maybe you just don’t want to pay for a Windows license. Linux is both free as in beer and free as in freedom!


Useful Resources


https://www.reddit.com/r/linux_gaming/ - A fairly large linux gaming community

https://www.gamingonlinux.com/ - One of the larger linux gaming blogs

https://alternativeto.net/ for general software recommendations.

https://lgc.lysioneer.nl/ - Tool to see how many of your Steam games already run on Linux. (Natively, or through Wine/DXVK). Doesn't currently include Proton compatibility due to Proton still being very new.

https://www.protondb.com/ - Check Steam Play/ Proton compatibility.

https://lutris.net/ - To fetch scripts to configure games in Wine/Lutris.

Where to buy games?

Most of the big distribution platforms sell Linux games these days! Steam, and GOG both support Linux, and by extension any of the store fronts which sell keys for those stores will also give you Linux versions, since both GOG and Steam usually include all operating systems under a single purchase. Humble also distribute DRM free copies of Linux games for those which support it.
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
And just so it's clear - this thread is very much a WIP. Any help will be great.

I was going to work on it some more, but wanted it up tonight so for now I believe this is polished enough.
 

Arkanius

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,627
VKDX has been a gigantic boon to Linux gaming lately, together with Valve's Linux push.
Glad to see this thread to raise more awareness to Tux gaming.
 

denpanosekai

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,308
Great work. I've been using Linux at work for over 20 years but never really bothered with games thanks to consoles and handhelds. I'm stunned to learn that 25% of steam games run on Linux! Great progress.
 

Joezie

Member
Nov 6, 2017
352
Your dedication to the cause is much appreciated OP!

Though I do have a slackware install on a PC, its far too old to run most games(P4, 256mb RAM). Won't stop me from slacking it up when I scrap up enough money for a new rig though. Year of the Linux Desktop meme, come to life and take me away!
 

Gabbo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,373
I'm going to have to fire up a separate install of Linux for my main machine (or risk massive compatibility issues with my old gtx660/yorkfield c2q-powered HTPC).
Lutris might make playing old games through Wine super easy, since half of them won't run in Windows itself anymore.
Book marking this page.
 

Eylos

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,252
I use lubuntu for already 3 years, i have an old pc, i only play in consoles today, but i really liked linux, when i get a new pc i will continue to use linux maybe another distro as main OS, and windows as secondary, for some games.

But great initiative OP
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,512
Hell yeah.

I game on Linux because.... I use Linux anyhow and I don't like to reboot!!
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
Like many here, I use Linux for my work, but the relative freedom compared to Windows is definitely a big reason why I've been using it on my personal machine for years. I think since around Ubuntu 10.04. Compared to some here though, that's probably not that long.

My first experience with Linux was Fedora (6?) on a laptop I used at college. That was also my first experience with Xfce, which I used because it was light and run better on the thing. To this day I still prefer Xfce to all the other DE's out there.

Thank you!
 

Nzyme32

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,728
Very nice.

Though it is rare that I use Linux for now, I love how it keeps growing with some nice nudges and improvement Valve are quitely pushing.

Every time there's the whining of "Linux has no games", its fun to see just how many keep showing up.
Linux user experience is a real sore point for me, but I feel it is also a bit of a lack of knowledge on my part too.

Now if Valve put out a portable / handheld PC that had better build quality than GPD and saved on cost with SteamOS/Linux using some mini Steam Controller for PC centric games, that would be my in
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
What I've been playing lately:
I really should get into this. Really enjoy classic Wipeout.

Recently I've been playing:




I also have Icewind Dale from GOG, but that's been sitting in the background a little.

Now if Valve put out a portable / handheld PC that had better build quality than GPD and saved on cost with SteamOS/Linux using some mini Steam Controller for PC centric games, that would be my in
I've mentioned it before on Era, but I would totally buy a handheld Steam machine.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,512
Is anyone working on the way to get your wine Steam games to play with your native steam client? I usually hardly use wine, but with the recent developments on dxvk...
 

Sidebuster

Member
Oct 26, 2017
445
California
I've recently just made the commitment of dedicated Linux for gaming. No more Windows. I've been using Linux since I found a copy of Red Hat at an Office Depot for $50 in like 2004 or so. Didn't realize at the time there were options in terms of operating systems. Though I've never really stopped using Linux, I've never gave up completely on Windows. It really does feel like the time is drawing near where it's easier than ever to make the switch permanent.

I've been playing Dead Cells and Dying light since they have native builds. They run great too. Out of my 494 Steam games, 181 of them have Linux builds.
 

Carn

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,424
The Netherlands
Cool topic. Im not a pc player anymore, but I will probably opt for Linux if I jump back in. Just curious, what are some recent 'AAA' games that run on Linux and how do they perform compared to their Windows versions? I know Doom should be fine, but that's pretty much all I know.
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
I've recently just made the commitment of dedicated Linux for gaming. No more Windows. I've been using Linux since I found a copy of Red Hat at an Office Depot for $50 in like 2004 or so. Didn't realize at the time there were options in terms of operating systems. Though I've never really stopped using Linux, I've never gave up completely on Windows. It really does feel like the time is drawing near where it's easier than ever to make the switch permanent.

I've been playing Dead Cells and Dying light since they have native builds. They run great too. Out of my 494 Steam games, 181 of them have Linux builds.
Thanks for reminding me about Dead Cells. I added that and EXAPUNKS to the OP.
 
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unapersson

Member
Oct 27, 2017
217
Very nice.

Linux user experience is a real sore point for me, but I feel it is also a bit of a lack of knowledge on my part too.
Was trying to get used to virtual desktops on Win 10 recently and it was painful in comparison, so I'm sure a lot of these things are down to knowledge and experience.
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
Cool topic. Im not a pc player anymore, but I will probably opt for Linux if I jump back in. Just curious, what are some recent 'AAA' games that run on Linux and how do they perform compared to their Windows versions? I know Doom should be fine, but that's pretty much all I know.
Feral Interactive have done good work recently, porting Rise of the Tomb Raider and a bunch of other games. Performance is okay on latest video card drivers, but with a small overhead compared to the Windows version (I think they just use a DX to Vulkan wrapper?). Not a big problem, but noticeable. I'm talking maybe 10% reduction in FPS, but not sure if this has been reduced recently.

Native games without wrappers like Doom as you mentioned still perform much better. Doom runs well on WIne, but doesn't have a native version.

Console "AAA" is definitely one of the weaker markets when it comes to Linux support, sadly. Most of the bigger PC focused games do better.
 
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Joezie

Member
Nov 6, 2017
352
It should also be noted that certain engines or franchises which may have never themselves made the jump to linux for a variety of reasons can still(or will in the future) unofficially run under it. Projects like OpenMW(Morrowind Engine reimplementation), Xoreos(Bioware Aurora engine reimplimentation, OpenRCT2(Rollercoaster Tycoon) and OpenTTD(Transport Tycoon Delux)

Others like OpenRA or OpenXcom, games of which may run under the likes of DOSBox or so may even have some added functionality that you might not find in the original games thanks to new engine work such as extensible interfaces and what not.
 

the botanist

Member
Jun 18, 2018
7
Wait, since when did a native client for Doom exist? I thought it only runs through wine although it has very good performance doing so.

That being said, this is a very interesting topic. I am building a new office/gaming machine right now and it's obviously going to be a straight up linux machine. Gaming is not a priority for me but I'm really impressed by the current developments with dxvk enhancing compatibility with a lot of dx11 games. I will certainly be keeping an eye on this thread.

Also one has to keep in mind that a huge number of emulators run on linux so even console 'AAA' on linux is not unthinkable at all.
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
Wait, since when did a native client for Doom exist? I thought it only runs through wine although it has very good performance doing so.

That being said, this is a very interesting topic. I am building a new office/gaming machine right now and it's obviously going to be a straight up linux machine. Gaming is not a priority for me but I'm really impressed by the current developments with dxvk enhancing compatibility with a lot of dx11 games. I will certainly be keeping an eye on this thread.

Also one has to keep in mind that a huge number of emulators run on linux so even console 'AAA' on linux is not unthinkable at all.
My bad. I just responded and remembered Vulkan support being a big deal with Doom. Just checked and yeah, it's just supported in Wine.
 

Joezie

Member
Nov 6, 2017
352
Ah, see, the little I knew wasn't even correct, heh. Any info about older AAA games for Linux? Or is that also mostly through Wine support?
Most will run through wine just fine. Though depending on popularity as my last post shows, communities sometimes re create the engines to some of these games and only run the data files through it. In essence, running the game natively in the environment. They vary in quality, but the older the game, the better the implementation. Things like Xoreos and OpenMW are still maturing greatly, though OpenMW is still far ahead of Xoreos.
 
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Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,152
Ah, see, the little I knew wasn't even correct, heh. Any info about older AAA games for Linux? Or is that also mostly through Wine support?
Depends what you would call older AAA, but since Linux was weaker years ago and a lot of games won't be releasing updates on the size of support for a new OS... yes. There will be plenty which are only available through Wine.

That said, Valve have ported pretty much all their games natively, so Portal 1&2, Half Life, CS:GO, etc. There's also native support for all the Metro games, Spec Ops, Alien Isolation, Saints Row IV, and a whole bunch of others. Slightly older AAA games on Linux natively definitely do exist.

I can't comment on all of them, but Valve's native releases are all great.

If you are talking even older than those, say 2005-2010, then I can't think of much right now, but that's more my fault than anything. The really old stuff often survives through Wine better than it does on Windows, and in some cases you'll even get custom engine reimplementations for native support like what was mentioned by Joezie.
 
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Bjones

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,079
I use different Linux distros in my personal life for everything except for the majority of gaming. I do however keep a hdd totally dedicated to steam os with hopes and dreams attached.


But I will post relevant games when possible
 

Krejlooc

Dreamcast Porno Party
Member
Oct 27, 2017
16,215
Just like to give perspective from someone developing a game from scratch (i.e. bespoke engine, not prefab) to hit as many targets as possible, who also did the same back in 1999 - developing games for linux today is way, way easier than it used to be. Back in 1999, I had a mentor, and we developed a port of Ultima I-IV using SDL for linux. It was a nightmare of dependencies. This was the Redhat linux days. Our project was a passion project, not really intended for distribution, but we still saw the problems. Even between our two computers, which had been set up to try and be as similar as possible, getting the thing to deploy was a nightmare. Counting on every person to hunt down and install the correct dependencies to build our programs was virtually impossible, it made distribution a pipe dream. On the development side, we actually developed on windows using Visual Studio 97, because even back then the debugging tools on windows were so much better. OpenGL drivers on linux were an absolute mess, they wouldn't just vary from vendor to vendor, but also from graphics card to graphics card. Absolutely nothing was standard.

Today, it's like night and day. Steam itself has been the biggest change. In particlar, steam has solved the dependency hell. You no longer build for a bunch of random dependencies, instead you treat Steam itself like a dependency, a standard library to build against, that ensures some degree of cross platform maintainability. You built across steam dependencies, and you're good. Valve handles the rest for you. Valve makes sure users can run steam as easily as possible on linux, and so long as you can use Steam's dependencies, you're golden. You don't even have to use steam itself. Just steam being on a PC provides enough stability to create an easy environment. SDL2 takes care of much of the other work. If there is any odd cleanup needed, the way linux shifted towards automated dependency distribution though synaptic managers or apt or whatver has been a god send. Often, you don't even have to worry about that at all.

In terms of IDE, things are better but still not like Visual Studio. I mainly do my development on windows using Visual Studio, but going to linux and thus using Eclipse is not a night and day difference anymore. Visual wrappers for GDB are prevalent now. Tools like VOGL make GL debugging on linux actually possible. It's pretty amazing how quickly things got better.

Re: Video card driver problems between Nvidia and AMD -- the trick to avoiding this pitfall is to primarily target OpenGL ES, which will inadvertently force you to target the core profile. That might be a bit of a step backwards (well, not might -- it definitely is) but you avoid all the problems caused by custom extensions. Stick with the core profile, and you'll avoid lots and lots of the messes OpenGL brings. Alternatively, Vulkan side steps the issue by design, although I'm not nearly as well versed in vulkan development as I am with OpenGL.

Myself? I use OpenGL ES 3.0, which still nets me about 70% of the android market in terms of compatibility while making the entire PC landscape accessible. That still gives me access to more modern things, like way way more unifform slots than OpenGL ES 2.0, while keeping things compatible for all but essentially cricket phones.
 
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Zexion

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,031
I've always wanted to go full Linux (I run Lubuntu on my Chromebook) but there are some games that I play that just don't work with Wine / DXVK (League, PUBG, Any game with Denuvo)

I'm currently holding off to get one of the new Zen APUs and then I can setup GPU Passthrough
 

DavidBoring

Member
Oct 27, 2017
68
Great thread, I've been using Linux Mint for some years now, but haven't played much on PC for years apart from some old classics. I had some troubles with Wine from time to time, but will have a look at luntris, sounds promising
 

Soundchaser

Member
Oct 25, 2017
643
Glad to see a thread about gaming on Linux here, more people should be aware of this option for PC gaming.
 

Bjones

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,079
Just like to give perspective from someone developing a game from scratch (i.e. bespoke engine, not prefab) to hit as many targets as possible, who also did the same back in 1999 - developing games for linux today is way, way easier than it used to be. Back in 1999, I had a mentor, and we developed a port of Ultima I-IV using SDL for linux. It was a nightmare of dependencies. This was the Redhat linux days. Our project was a passion project, not really intended for distribution, but we still saw the problems. Even between our two computers, which had been set up to try and be as similar as possible, getting the thing to deploy was a nightmare. Counting on every person to hunt down and install the correct dependencies to build our programs was virtually impossible, it made distribution a pipe dream. On the development side, we actually developed on windows using Visual Studio 97, because even back then the debugging tools on windows were so much better. OpenGL drivers on linux were an absolute mess, they wouldn't just vary from vendor to vendor, but also from graphics card to graphics card. Absolutely nothing was standard.

Today, it's like night and day. Steam itself has been the biggest change. In particlar, steam has solved the dependency hell. You no longer build for a bunch of random dependencies, instead you treat Steam itself like a dependency, a standard library to build against, that ensures some degree of cross platform maintainability. You built across steam dependencies, and you're good. Valve handles the rest for you. Valve makes sure users can run steam as easily as possible on linux, and so long as you can use Steam's dependencies, you're golden. You don't even have to use steam itself. Just steam being on a PC provides enough stability to create an easy environment. SDL2 takes care of much of the other work. If there is any odd cleanup needed, the way linux shifted towards automated dependency distribution though synaptic managers or apt or whatver has been a god send. Often, you don't even have to worry about that at all.

In terms of IDE, things are better but still not like Visual Studio. I mainly do my development on windows using Visual Studio, but going to linux and thus using code blocks is not a night and day difference anymore. Visual wrappers for GDB are prevalent now. Tools like VOGL make GL debugging on linux actually possible. It's pretty amazing how quickly things got better.

Re: Video card driver problems between Nvidia and AMD -- the trick to avoiding this pitfall is to primarily target OpenGL ES. That might be a bit of a step backwards (well, not might -- it definitely is) but you avoid all the problems caused by custom extensions. Stick with the core profile, and you'll avoid lots and lots of the messes OpenGL brings. Alternatively, Vulkan side steps the issue by design, although I'm not nearly as well versed in vulkan development as I am with OpenGL.


I primarily use code blocks for c++ development.

Even used it with the Linux version of unreal sdk.

I have been using sdl and OpenGL for my game but I am currently moving everything to Godot. Which is nice though it’s shader support is crap( mainly you can’t pass arrays to shaders which is a huge deal for me)

I use visual studio at work for the past 16 years and I hate it now. Mainly because beyond the odd console program most things I do are web related. Angular, node, electron. All can be done better using CLI s and text editors. Though visual studio code is really nice.
 

Krejlooc

Dreamcast Porno Party
Member
Oct 27, 2017
16,215
I primarily use code blocks for c++ development.
Heh, you caught my post between edits. I actually used to use code blocks, but switched to Eclipse about a year ago. Either way you go, though, linux IDEs are way better than what they used to be 10, 20 years ago. There was a time when you'd be laughed at for suggesting codeblocks or eclipse. Not really anymore IMO.

I use visual studio at work for the past 16 years and I hate it now. Mainly because beyond the odd console program most things I do are web related. Angular, node, electron. All can be done better using CLI s and text editors. Though visual studio code is really nice.
It's the perf tools of VS that I love. VS has really, really good perf tools. But there are slowly options arising on linux.
 

CGriffiths86

Member
Oct 28, 2017
307
This thread came at a time where I'm really thinking about going linux on my PC. I don't game anymore so this would just be for general use. I've used Mint/Ubuntu in the past and have an XPS 13 which I know is fully compatible with it all.
 

Krejlooc

Dreamcast Porno Party
Member
Oct 27, 2017
16,215
Heck, I'll go so far as to make the not-so-bold declaration that, these days, Linux is a better gaming platform than OSX. Especially going forward.
 

Damaniel

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
1,634
Portland, OR
I'm strongly tempted to do this, probably this weekend. My Windows PC at work pretty much just serves as a front end for accessing my Linux servers/devices, and almost everything I do in my personal life would work equally well (web stuff) or better (development) on the Linux side. I have a Surface Pro (or could use VirtualBox for non-gaming stuff) to do Windows things.

I could at least dual boot for the one-off game that I can't play any other way, but there aren't even really many of those.

Also, according to that compatibility website, the vast majority of the games I actually play either have native Linux ports or have Platinum rating in Wine (it helps I'm not super huge into most AAA stuff). Looks promising.
 
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StereoVSN

Member
Nov 1, 2017
4,446
Eastern US
Thank you for the thread! I have been thinking of loading up new Ubuntu LTS 18.04 onto my older gaming system and his gives me enough drive to mess with it.

I am not going to install Linux on my main gaming PC but it will be interesting to tool around with it on the secondary. I do work with server based (CentOS/RedHat/Amazon) Linux flavors at work quite a bit but haven’t really done anything with desktop side in a few years.
 

Dancrane212

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,556
Still rocking SteamOS for my HTPC. Sure the games selection is weaker than Windows but it's the closest thing out there to getting a console interface on PC.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,512
Was trying to get used to virtual desktops on Win 10 recently and it was painful in comparison, so I'm sure a lot of these things are down to knowledge and experience.
It does have a lot to do with your exclamation. Linux may be the Dark Souls of operating systems but I switched like 5 years ago and sure enough now using Mac or Windows feels clunky because I've gotten used to something else.
 
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Krejlooc

Dreamcast Porno Party
Member
Oct 27, 2017
16,215
mainly you can’t pass arrays to shaders which is a huge deal for me
oh hey, heads up -- no experience with godot, but does it allow your vertex shader to access texture units? If so, easy way to get around this is to treat a 1D Texture like an array. Build your texture in SDL in software accessing the buffer, then push it to your video card before your draw call.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,512
Still rocking SteamOS for my HTPC. Sure the games selection is weaker than Windows but it's the closest thing out there to getting a console interface on PC.
I've ended up sticking with steamos on the TV as well. At first I was using it because I was curious, and then after like a year I thought "okay I'll put it desktop on here because that will be more useful". 2 weeks later: back to steamos. And I've done that twice more since.

Install desktop thinking I'm going to setup all kinds of neat stuff>>wompwomp>>back to steamos because lazy.

It's not yet a console replacement but it mostly side steps all of maintenance and setup of a machine. Do install. Play games. Optionally; use steamos-tools to make Chrome-kiosk "streaming apps" that kick the PS4 versions to the curb.
 
Oct 27, 2017
651
I would love to use Linux versus Windows especially once I switch over to a laptop versus a desktop PC but the majority of what I play on PC isn't available on Linux natively. If games like Deathsmiles, some visual novels, and RPG Maker games like Yume Nikki, Mad Father, Ib, etc were available then it would be a no brainer.
 

nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,842
I ran Xubuntu for a while and used Wine to run some games that didn't have native support to fairly satisfactory results. Oddly enough, I discovered that F.E.A.R. ran much better through Wine than on Windows. Something to do with HID devices.

I hear DXVK is a bit of a game changer on that front.
 

Mugen

Member
Oct 28, 2017
545
Stockholm, Sweden
I have been playing the Steamworld games on my laptop under Fedora. Be aware that there is some controller fiddling with at least the GOG version of the first Steamworld Dig, but if you are fine with importing into Steam such things are often fine. Else consult GOG forums or PCGW for correct config files.
 

Deleted member 11934

User requested account closure
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
1,045
I really need to move back to Linux, really tired of Windows shit about OpenSSH and Bash and Git, but GPU passthrough is a must for me, I need GPU acceleration for the Creative Cloud and other stuff. I already tried it in the past successfully but having only 4 threads and 4 cores it's pretty hard to run stuff like Siege. I do most of my gaming on Switch these days (all of it basically) so I might even try it anyway.

I use visual studio at work for the past 16 years and I hate it now. Mainly because beyond the odd console program most things I do are web related. Angular, node, electron. All can be done better using CLI s and text editors. Though visual studio code is really nice.
Dude, VSCode is leading right now basically. Atom, Sublime Text, Brackets (dunno if they're still working on it) are all good, but VSCode is really the sweet spot in term of features and speed. Nothing to do with VS really, it's its own thing.



EDIT: Fuck it I ordered a m.2 SSD so I can install Arch Linux on it with minimal hassle.
 
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