Gaming on Linux 2019 | A GNU Era of Gaming

spool

Member
Oct 27, 2017
328
I was surprised to see a Larian game being announced for Stadia.

They fumbled the Linux port of Original Sin hard, and it was, as I remember it, mostly an issue with middleware. They never bothered with Original Sin 2.

Obsidian had to cut cloak physics out of Pillars of Eternity due to relying on closed source middleware without a Linux version. It seems like it's one of those potentially serious hurdles lurking behind the scenes.
 

Dave.

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,206
So Destiny 2 on Stadia, and on Steam - it should be playable on Linux somehow (is it already?)

The Bungie stream def suggested some quite serious effort was expended, so probably not just running through a translation layer (but I suppose also not entirely ruled out): "development wise, there was an impact because we've taken a bunch of our talented engineering team, to stand up Stadia this year"
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
Personally although I do hope they Stadia is a success I'm still pessimistic on its success doing anything for us Linux gamers . I feel like less than 10 % of those titles will be released on steam with a linux build for local execution ...

Am I the only that feels that once again the fact that the back end relies on Linux it still won't change anything for us at home ?
 

Corralx

Member
Aug 23, 2018
97
London, UK
Personally although I do hope they Stadia is a success I'm still pessimistic on its success doing anything for us Linux gamers . I feel like less than 10 % of those titles will be released on steam with a linux build for local execution ...

Am I the only that feels that once again the fact that the back end relies on Linux it still won't change anything for us at home ?
No it won't change anything because:
- Stadia is Linux-based but there's a lot of custom stuff that Google built and games will use that it's not available on Desktop Linux (including many Vulkan extensions).
- Even tho developers will likely build a Linux version as it's easier to develop and debug, publishing it still means doing the final extra work of polishing (which takes a loooong time usually), plus it means giving support which adds a whole lot of other costs that are not justified for the little gains.

I don't see Stadia benefitting Desktop Linux much if at all, in terms of number of AAA games published on Linux. OTOH you get more developers with Linux and Vulkan experience, and potentially better tools and drivers, which is still a nice profit and might help in the long run.
 

alosarjos

Member
Oct 27, 2017
259
I see the Stadia at it's best as more resources going into Linux drivers and libraries (mesa), but not as more native games coming sadly. Perhaps, if IDEs, debugging tools and the development frameworks improve enough, publishing Linux builds won't be such an extra cost.
 

zoku88

Member
Oct 27, 2017
428
No it won't change anything because:
- Stadia is Linux-based but there's a lot of custom stuff that Google built and games will use that it's not available on Desktop Linux (including many Vulkan extensions).
- Even tho developers will likely build a Linux version as it's easier to develop and debug, publishing it still means doing the final extra work of polishing (which takes a loooong time usually), plus it means giving support which adds a whole lot of other costs that are not justified for the little gains.

I don't see Stadia benefitting Desktop Linux much if at all, in terms of number of AAA games published on Linux. OTOH you get more developers with Linux and Vulkan experience, and potentially better tools and drivers, which is still a nice profit and might help in the long run.
I don't think what you said about the Vulkan extensions is true. Any extensions would need to be supported by the graphics driver or mesa. Unless Google is making one from scratch, they be editing the amd ones in the kernel. Not sure if the license would allow them to not release those changes.

EDIT : I guess it's mit license so I guess they wouldn't have to. However, not really sure what extensions Google specifically would need...

I'm not sure if there will be "a lot" of custom stuff. There's really no reason for Google to create that much for things that already exist, afterall. I'm sure there's some to support the stadia specific stuff like networking or that hot join stuff they were talking about...
 
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TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
I'm not sure if there will be "a lot" of custom stuff. There's really no reason for Google to create that much for things that already exist, afterall. I'm sure there's some to support the stadia specific stuff like networking or that hot join stuff they were talking about...
That's the thing though there is not a lot of "custom sauce" to make Stadia what it is . And Vulkan wise as far as can be investigated they didn't create much of anything custom . On the other hand in terms of distributed calculation and how to even out the load , or hell even share already rendered scenes by other instances to reuse them when appropriate (so overglorified shader caching ) now that's where their special sauce enters into and is shinning the most .

So technically those Stadia builds are nothing more than a Linux build with Stadia sauce on the side . Yet I still feel that most developpers won't go the extra mile of also beta testing the build for local execution by us Linux gamers .
 

itsamiracle

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
1,451
I was toying around with dmenu and came up with a simple script to launch installed steam games, in case anyone is interested:

Code:
#!/bin/sh

find $HOME/.steam/steam/steamapps/ -iname "appmanifest_*.acf"\
    | xargs -I {} awk -F'"' '/appid/ {printf $4"-"} /name/ {print $4}' {}\
    | dmenu -i\
    | awk -F'-' '{print $1}'\
    | xargs -I {} bash -c 'steam steam://rungameid/{}'
Edit: Minor correction
 
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thebishop

Member
Nov 10, 2017
1,441
Personally although I do hope they Stadia is a success I'm still pessimistic on its success doing anything for us Linux gamers . I feel like less than 10 % of those titles will be released on steam with a linux build for local execution ...

Am I the only that feels that once again the fact that the back end relies on Linux it still won't change anything for us at home ?
In the near term, I think you're right. I don't think the existence of Stadia is going to result in major publishers releasing native linux games.

However, there are a bunch of factors where I think Stadia definitely will benefit Linux gamers.

- Aggressive moves to streamline the Linux stack (kernel, drivers, api, etc) for gaming. Valve already got this ball rolling and with Google entering the field, it's only going to get better. Much of that will go upstream for all of us.

- Increased support and even preference for Vulkan on Windows games. Rage2 on PC *only* provides a Vulkan renderer on Windows. I think we're going to see more of this, and it means an increasingly smooth Proton experience on Linux. ProtonDB reports a "gold" performance rating for Rage 2. As long as devs don't use awful DRM schemes, Stadia's push to Vulkan should mean an increasing number of brand new AAA games will work out of the box with Proton.

- Linux codebase only helps for the future. If something changes to the market ecosystem, if Chromebooks start shipping discrete GPUs. If Valve takes another stab at Steam Machines. If Windows blows up spectacularly and more OEMs offer a Linux pre-install option, then thanks to Stadia, many games will be ready to run natively with minor effort.
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
In the near term, I think you're right. I don't think the existence of Stadia is going to result in major publishers releasing native linux games.

However, there are a bunch of factors where I think Stadia definitely will benefit Linux gamers.

- Aggressive moves to streamline the Linux stack (kernel, drivers, api, etc) for gaming. Valve already got this ball rolling and with Google entering the field, it's only going to get better. Much of that will go upstream for all of us.

- Increased support and even preference for Vulkan on Windows games. Rage2 on PC *only* provides a Vulkan renderer on Windows. I think we're going to see more of this, and it means an increasingly smooth Proton experience on Linux. ProtonDB reports a "gold" performance rating for Rage 2. As long as devs don't use awful DRM schemes, Stadia's push to Vulkan should mean an increasing number of brand new AAA games will work out of the box with Proton.

- Linux codebase only helps for the future. If something changes to the market ecosystem, if Chromebooks start shipping discrete GPUs. If Valve takes another stab at Steam Machines. If Windows blows up spectacularly and more OEMs offer a Linux pre-install option, then thanks to Stadia, many games will be ready to run natively with minor effort.
Yeah I do see those potential positive fallouts too happening in the long run yet it's yet again an indirect show of improvement rather than being a frontal tonal shift from AAA companies .
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
I don't think it's necessarily going to get us more Linux ports. But I have a feeling Google is out there evangelizing Vulkan and practices that would make games run better and more easily through translation layers.
 

thebishop

Member
Nov 10, 2017
1,441
Yeah I do see those potential positive fallouts too happening in the long run yet it's yet again an indirect show of improvement rather than being a frontal tonal shift from AAA companies .
Pretty much. Publishers have no special interest in supporting Linux right now. DOOM 2016 was the first major game adapted for Vulkan, and Bethesda never planned to release it for Linux. Steams own surveys show Linux usage hovering a bit under 1%. As a linux user (and an ultrabook user at that), this is a major reason I'm hyped for Stadia.

IMO the best bet for major *native* support for Linux goes like this:
- Stadia has a successful launch window and builds a strong enough user base early in 2020/2021 that Google doesn't have to bribe publishers to port their games to it.
- Valve sidesteps the next-gen bloodbath of PC+Console+Streaming and goes big with VR
- Sometime around 2023 Valve releases an end-to-end VR solution based on a mainstream priced revision of Index and a 1st party set top box to power it. The set top box runs an improved SteamOS.
- The system is designed for VR, but also plugs into your TV and plays traditional 2d games.
- The VR system is reasonably successful, selling like 20-30M
- Seeing low-risk/decent-reward, major publishers adapt their Stadia builds to run on SteamOS
- SteamOS and Steam for Linux are the same depot on Steam, and Desktop Linux users also get the native games.
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
At least right now more and more indies are supporting us and there are more games releasing than I can chew them .

(then again I also do play VN/Dating Sim type games on top of Hidden Object games .... soooo I might be a bit biased here :P )
 

nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,870
I'm not expecting much beyond slightly increased use of Vulkan in Windows games, but even just that would be nice.
 
OP
OP
Nappael

Nappael

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,177
I expect that at least for now, most larger games will still release inexplicably with DirectX only even when we know they have a functional Vulkan renderer.

Over time, that might improve. That's my hope at least.
 

eddy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
766
It boggles my mind that Ubisoft is still releasing Assassin's Creed on DX11 while IIRC having both DX12 and Vulkan renderers.
 

Xharos

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,643
Canary Islands, Spain
Supporting DX11 means supporting older video cards. I'm pretty sure new computers were coming out 5 years ago with Fermi cards.
Nobody is saying they shouldn't keep DX11 support (well actually they shouldn't lol), but rather to support both DX11 and Vulkan. They already have the renderer up and working right? Just let us use it! Mark it as beta or unsupported if you want lol. Like, leaving Linux aside, imagine the performance boost and CPU usage decrease on Windows if AC Odyssey had a Vulkan option. My i7 6700k + 1070 + 1080p 144 Hz monitor combo would cry tears of joy lol.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
I think vulkan support could be significantly spurred by more active evangelism. Maybe if google pushes for it more...
 

bmfrosty

Member
Oct 27, 2017
561
SF Bay Area
I think vulkan support could be significantly spurred by more active evangelism. Maybe if google pushes for it more...
I think you're right here. I wonder how many companies will be wrapping thier games in dxvk and wine for stadia...

EDIT: After a bit of thought, I like that outcome. Maybe it leads to updates that make their games more wine compatible.
 
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Corralx

Member
Aug 23, 2018
97
London, UK
Gonna play the devil's advocate for the sake of discussion.

In the near term, I think you're right. I don't think the existence of Stadia is going to result in major publishers releasing native linux games.

However, there are a bunch of factors where I think Stadia definitely will benefit Linux gamers.

- Aggressive moves to streamline the Linux stack (kernel, drivers, api, etc) for gaming. Valve already got this ball rolling and with Google entering the field, it's only going to get better. Much of that will go upstream for all of us.
Stadia is a project that has likely been in development for years, it not something you pull out of the hat in a month, and there's been no indication of Google actually contributing back much in terms of kernel/driver/api, and I don't see this changing. You need all possible technological edges over the competition to win in this market.

There is an exception to that, tho. Google is the main developer of the HLSL (DirectX shading language) to SPIR-V (Vulkan binary shader format) cross-compiler, to ease the process of porting DirectX games to Vulkan. They had a conference on that at GDC 2019 as well.

- Increased support and even preference for Vulkan on Windows games. Rage2 on PC *only* provides a Vulkan renderer on Windows. I think we're going to see more of this, and it means an increasingly smooth Proton experience on Linux. ProtonDB reports a "gold" performance rating for Rage 2. As long as devs don't use awful DRM schemes, Stadia's push to Vulkan should mean an increasing number of brand new AAA games will work out of the box with Proton.
There's no indication of that so far, Rage 2 being the exception. But that's not only on Stadia, but co-developed with id Software, pretty much the only AAA software house using Vulkan instead of DirectX on PC.
Microsoft consoles are and will still be an important target (more than Stadia unless they manage to shake the market from the ground up, which is unlikely with PS Now and xCloud) and DirectX 12 usage is required on Xbox. On top of that you get all the tools (where Vulkan is still lacking (especially on Nvidia's side, although recently there's been some improvements), and free Microsoft support if needed.


- Linux codebase only helps for the future. If something changes to the market ecosystem, if Chromebooks start shipping discrete GPUs. If Valve takes another stab at Steam Machines. If Windows blows up spectacularly and more OEMs offer a Linux pre-install option, then thanks to Stadia, many games will be ready to run natively with minor effort.
These are a lot of huge if. People said the same with the Steam Machines, and the same when Proton was released.
And even if this was the case and the Linux market blew past the 10% or so to make it profitable, a game for Stadia won't run on Linux and would require a notable effort to fix. Certainly not something I would consider minor. The graphics API is only a side of it, and even that would not come for free as you now have to support 2 or 3 new drivers (Nvidia, MESA and AMD), with their bugs, quirks and performance characteristics.



EDIT: Just to add more fire to the discussion, Amazon Canada is listing DooM Eternal for PC, coming to Linux as well.
Apparently is the only store doing so and Amazon as incorrectly listed games for Linux multiple times before but there's that.
Maybe after the "first" DooM didn't end up shipping on Linux despite being internally in a working state, we'll see the second chapter?

 
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Alexandros

Member
Oct 26, 2017
6,651
I think that Stadia will indeed help in Vulkan adoption. I mean, if you have a native Vulkan version ready to go, why not release it?
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
EDIT: Just to add more fire to the discussion, Amazon Canada is listing DooM Eternal for PC, coming to Linux as well.
Apparently is the only store doing so and Amazon as incorrectly listed games for Linux multiple times before but there's that.
Maybe after the "first" DooM didn't end up shipping on Linux despite being internally in a working state, we'll see the second chapter?

Once it has been white listed on Proton everyone tried it with proton sooo Bethesda got a glimpse of what modern day Linux market look like for the series (remember Proton didn't change just things on our side , now when we use proton to play a game the sell of our copy is categorized as a linux sell when the developpper receives the money from Valve )

Soooo maybe Bethesda wanna see if it will pan out for them with Doom Eternal .

Like you I'm doubtfull yet when DOOM was whitelisted come on every linux gaming discord server / telegram group / skype window was bursting with convos about "does it work okay for you ?"

EDIT : you also forgot the Total War Games are going Vulkan too on their Linux versions and more and more those games are more than just a wrapping job and it shows ...
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
Once it has been white listed on Proton everyone tried it with proton sooo Bethesda got a glimpse of what modern day Linux market look like for the series (remember Proton didn't change just things on our side , now when we use proton to play a game the sell of our copy is categorized as a linux sell when the developpper receives the money from Valve )

Soooo maybe Bethesda wanna see if it will pan out for them with Doom Eternal .

Like you I'm doubtfull yet when DOOM was whitelisted come on every linux gaming discord server / telegram group / skype window was bursting with convos about "does it work okay for you ?"

EDIT : you also forgot the Total War Games are going Vulkan too on their Linux versions and more and more those games are more than just a wrapping job and it shows ...
Rather than Bethesda publishing a Linux version, I think it's more likely that ID would make sure the game runs great in proton.

There's a strong precedent for this with Eve online. They actually did maintain a Linux version, until they deemed it better to can that and instead thoroughly test the windows versian in wine to make sure it works as well as possible. As far as I know, this worked out the best for everybody because Linux players always got an up-to-date client, and wouldn't end up with bugs at the come low priority because of the smaller amount of users.

If they do that with doom, I consider that a pretty good outcome. Even if the publisher is not cool with Linux no, but the developers still can be and make sure their game will run smoothly out of the box on proton. Still counts as Linux use, still counts as a Linux sale, and could even end up whitelisted.
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
Rather than Bethesda publishing a Linux version, I think it's more likely that ID would make sure the game runs great in proton.

There's a strong precedent for this with Eve online. They actually did maintain a Linux version, until they deemed it better to can that and instead thoroughly test the windows versian in wine to make sure it works as well as possible. As far as I know, this worked out the best for everybody because Linux players always got an up-to-date client, and wouldn't end up with bugs at the come low priority because of the smaller amount of users.

If they do that with doom, I consider that a pretty good outcome. Even if the publisher is not cool with Linux no, but the developers still can be and make sure their game will run smoothly out of the box on proton. Still counts as Linux use, still counts as a Linux sale, and could even end up whitelisted.
I mean they already make a native linux client for Stadia anyway so why not go the extra mile at this point ?
I know I'm being hopeful and full of wishful thinking but come the fuck on your Stadia build in order to perform best it can needs to be a native linux build sure you can perform a wrapping job , but at this point you're making it harder for yourself just for the sake of not having to make a linux build in other words you're being needlessly obtuse and being a pain in the butt not just for us but also for your devs and yourself .
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
I mean they already make a native linux client for Stadia anyway so why not go the extra mile at this point ?
I know I'm being hopeful and full of wishful thinking but come the fuck on your Stadia build in order to perform best it can needs to be a native linux build sure you can perform a wrapping job , but at this point you're making it harder for yourself just for the sake of not having to make a linux build in other words you're being needlessly obtuse and being a pain in the butt not just for us but also for your devs and yourself.
I considered that and assumed that Bethesda would be obtuse and a pain in the ass!
 
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spool

Member
Oct 27, 2017
328
I'm not sure I want to support another id game on PC after how bad Doom 2016 was. I don't think it's just Proton fuckery (Platinum rating my ass if that's the case) since there's a bunch of discussion online that never mentions Linux.
 

TheSyldat

Banned
Nov 4, 2018
1,127
I considered that and and assumed that Bethesda would be obtuse and a pain in the ass!
Hence my precision of being needlessly obtuse and a pain in the butt not only for others but for themselves .

I mean seriously there is being obtuse because you wanna stick to your guns and then there is being self destructive .
 

nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,870
I'm not sure I want to support another id game on PC after how bad Doom 2016 was. I don't think it's just Proton fuckery (Platinum rating my ass if that's the case) since there's a bunch of discussion online that never mentions Linux.
It's some nonsense razer light up keyboard functionality that got patched into the game and never got fixed. Use this to bypass it and make the game not run like crap.
 

spool

Member
Oct 27, 2017
328
It's some nonsense razer light up keyboard functionality that got patched into the game and never got fixed. Use this to bypass it and make the game not run like crap.
That does nothing for me. Framerate can be above 100 and it's still a stuttery mess. I have a 144hz freesync monitor. OpenGL or Vulkan doesn't matter.

In addition to that, analog movement is busted in different ways depending on which controller you use. My Steam controller offers no range, with super slow walking until you press the stick all the way to the edge and you start running. It's better with a 360 controller, but still off.
 

nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,870
That does nothing for me. Framerate can be above 100 and it's still a stuttery mess. I have a 144hz freesync monitor. OpenGL or Vulkan doesn't matter.

In addition to that, analog movement is busted in different ways depending on which controller you use. My Steam controller offers no range, with super slow walking until you press the stick all the way to the edge and you start running. It's better with a 360 controller, but still off.
Sucks to hear that you're having problems with it. Maybe it's a variable refresh rate thing? I've heard of Doom not playing nice with Freesync even on Windows.
 

spool

Member
Oct 27, 2017
328
Sucks to hear that you're having problems with it. Maybe it's a variable refresh rate thing? I've heard of Doom not playing nice with Freesync even on Windows.
This made me go back to do some further testing, and I think it's a CPU thing. The performance stats the game can display for you shows red spikes and CPU frame times that are doubled or tripled, or even more, 1-2 times a second when the camera is moving. It has nothing to do with what's being displayed, or streaming in data, since you can look straight into a wall and move the camera around in tiny little circles and it still does it. I remembered Feral's gamemode thing and gave it a try, to no apparent effect. This is on a 4ghz 4790k.

I've also determined that analog movement on a 360 controller is bad in the same way it is on a Steam controller. The sticks feel a bit different and might have different deadzones, but it still goes "crawl crawl crawl crawl RUN" as you push the stick further and further.

I'm going to test the game on PS4, but the patch is 32 gigs so it's going to take a while.

Can you cap to 60 fps somehow? I'd be curious to see if that fixes things. Edit: Figured it out, and it somehow made it worse. The stutters are massive now.
 
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nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,870
Currently at work streaming Windows games running on a Linux computer to my cell phone. I'm living in the future.
 

riverfr0zen

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,441
Manhattan, New York
Since we sometimes discuss window managers here, just wanted to share:

I've wanted to try a tiling window manager like i3-wm for some time, but a lack of time and the amount of configuration it typically takes has always made me postpone. Last week I saw this article about Regolith Linux, and found it was an easy enough proposition for me to jump into right away.

The idea is to provide a bootstrapped i3-wm with "sane defaults" (heh) so as to be a gentler introduction to those who want to dip their feet. You can install it in two ways: 1) LiveCD, where you install Regolith as a (Ubuntu-derivative) distribution, or if you are already running an Ubuntu flavor, you can just install it as a desktop session (this is what I did, and it was painless). Doing it the second way lets you return easily to what you were previously using if you don't like it.

The other nice thing is that it is documented well, and stays true to the idea of "being an introduction" by providing pointers for getting deeper into i3-wm and the other software/tools around it that were used to set up Regolith itself. Highly recommend if you want to try out a tiling wm.

I haven't tried it with Steam yet though :)

Currently at work streaming Windows games running on a Linux computer to my cell phone. I'm living in the future.
Nice! What are you using to stream? Oh, is it that Steam streaming thing that was added?
 

thebishop

Member
Nov 10, 2017
1,441
I was surprised to see a Larian game being announced for Stadia.

They fumbled the Linux port of Original Sin hard, and it was, as I remember it, mostly an issue with middleware. They never bothered with Original Sin 2.

Obsidian had to cut cloak physics out of Pillars of Eternity due to relying on closed source middleware without a Linux version. It seems like it's one of those potentially serious hurdles lurking behind the scenes.
huh? D1 was one of the more impressive Linux ports imo. It ran well on my PC and supported gamepads properly. Interesting about the cloak physics in PoE. I didn't try that one.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
Currently at work streaming Windows games running on a Linux computer to my cell phone. I'm living in the future.
I wanna live in the future! :O

My phone is on its last legs. I mean it's ghetto. It used to be nice but I don't replace things till they break. I've really been needing one for over a month now, but I've got a little bit of choice paralysis. ( I thiiiiink I know what I want now)

When steam link first came out for Android, I tried it on this phone and it was already having a ton of trouble. I'll get a nice, up-to-date one so I can enjoy it smoothly.

I actually never play games while I'm out. I've learned that from owning many portables over the years. But I always loved the idea, and this is free (unbelievable), so I'm optimistic.
 

Serif

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
574
Since we sometimes discuss window managers here, just wanted to share:

I've wanted to try a tiling window manager like i3-wm for some time, but a lack of time and the amount of configuration it typically takes has always made me postpone. Last week I saw this article about Regolith Linux, and found it was an easy enough proposition for me to jump into right away.

The idea is to provide a bootstrapped i3-wm with "sane defaults" (heh) so as to be a gentler introduction to those who want to dip their feet. You can install it in two ways: 1) LiveCD, where you install Regolith as a (Ubuntu-derivative) distribution, or if you are already running an Ubuntu flavor, you can just install it as a desktop session (this is what I did, and it was painless). Doing it the second way lets you return easily to what you were previously using if you don't like it.

The other nice thing is that it is documented well, and stays true to the idea of "being an introduction" by providing pointers for getting deeper into i3-wm and the other software/tools around it that were used to set up Regolith itself. Highly recommend if you want to try out a tiling wm.

I haven't tried it with Steam yet though :)
Hey there, I'm running i3-gaps with Arch Linux and Steam runs pretty nicely. I've only switched from Gnome to i3 two weeks ago and the configuration wasn't too bad, but Regolith or its custom libraries a try if you just want something that looks nice while also having i3's advantages. It's noticeably snappy, and even when I run a game in fullscreen, I'm able to switch to another workspace.

 

itsamiracle

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
1,451
I never expected to stay in dwm but after getting used to its quirks I've stayed loyal for a while now. Master-stack layout is too good to leave on the table.
 

Dave.

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,206
LTT with some more mostly positive Linux coverage! (not really gaming, so a little OT I guess)

 

nded

Member
Nov 14, 2017
3,870
Nice! What are you using to stream? Oh, is it that Steam streaming thing that was added?
Yeah, Steam Remote Play, formerly known as Steam In-Home Streaming.
I wanna live in the future! :O

My phone is on its last legs. I mean it's ghetto. It used to be nice but I don't replace things till they break. I've really been needing one for over a month now, but I've got a little bit of choice paralysis. ( I thiiiiink I know what I want now)

When steam link first came out for Android, I tried it on this phone and it was already having a ton of trouble. I'll get a nice, up-to-date one so I can enjoy it smoothly.

I actually never play games while I'm out. I've learned that from owning many portables over the years. But I always loved the idea, and this is free (unbelievable), so I'm optimistic.
Got a brand new phone, so maybe that helps. Right now I'm just giddy it actually works and messing around playing games wildly incompatible with touch controls just to see if I can. I can definitely see myself playing XCOM on my lunch break like this.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
Yeah, Steam Remote Play, formerly known as Steam In-Home Streaming.

Got a brand new phone, so maybe that helps. Right now I'm just giddy it actually works and messing around playing games wildly incompatible with touch controls just to see if I can. I can definitely see myself playing XCOM on my lunch break like this.
The model I have is actually still for sale new. The issue is that mine has some sort of damage to the battery. Not only does it not hold much charge, but the system seems to get all kinds of bad reads of the voltage level and it hates life. Seriously it's really ghetto.

My thing is I can't have a glass screen. This is a Motorola Droid turbo 2 with a polycarbonate screen and I can't go back. I have some sort of personal problem with putting a thin beautiful phone under an ugly screen protector and fat protective case, and true ruggedized phones are overkill.

Edit: I shouldn't be babbling about phones. I just got reminded that I really need a phone now and it's bugging me lol.
 

hikarutilmitt

Member
Dec 16, 2017
2,583
The model I have is actually still for sale new. The issue is that mine has some sort of damage to the battery. Not only does it not hold much charge, but the system seems to get all kinds of bad reads of the voltage level and it hates life. Seriously it's really ghetto.

My thing is I can't have a glass screen. This is a Motorola Droid turbo 2 with a polycarbonate screen and I can't go back. I have some sort of personal problem with putting a thin beautiful phone under an ugly screen protector and fat protective case, and true ruggedized phones are overkill.

Edit: I shouldn't be babbling about phones. I just got reminded that I really need a phone now and it's bugging me lol.
Unless they surprise announce a new one soon, the Essential PH-1 covers a lot of bases. I feel like screen protectors are mostly needless these days with GG5 and such, and I hate giant cases. I just have a thinner bumper-style case on mine and it's never had any issues. It's also part of the Android One project, so it gets updates just as fast as Pixels do (I'm even on the Q beta 4 right now!).

And it's $500 or less.
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
Unless they surprise announce a new one soon, the Essential PH-1 covers a lot of bases. I feel like screen protectors are mostly needless these days with GG5 and such, and I hate giant cases. I just have a thinner bumper-style case on mine and it's never had any issues. It's also part of the Android One project, so it gets updates just as fast as Pixels do (I'm even on the Q beta 4 right now!).

And it's $500 or less.
Gorilla Glass 5.0 huh? I'll check out some YouTube torture tests. My plastic screen is awesome. It's clear as the day I got it except for damaged and has sustained very gracefully. In one corner, there's actually three little lacerations in it from God knows what and there's no distortion or otherwise around there.

Anyhow, I have a slightly more on topic question. I use my personal phone for work, and it has to get a set of those encrypted Google apps. I'm wondering if I ran a phone with Kali, would it be able to use those apps properly? I want to ask here before I asked my it...so I know how to ask lol. If nobody knows, I can probably go to the appropriate reddit or something.
 

hikarutilmitt

Member
Dec 16, 2017
2,583
Gorilla Glass 5.0 huh? I'll check out some YouTube torture tests. My plastic screen is awesome. It's clear as the day I got it except for damaged and has sustained very gracefully. In one corner, there's actually three little lacerations in it from God knows what and there's no distortion or otherwise around there.

Anyhow, I have a slightly more on topic question. I use my personal phone for work, and it has to get a set of those encrypted Google apps. I'm wondering if I ran a phone with Kali, would it be able to use those apps properly? I want to ask here before I asked my it...so I know how to ask lol. If nobody knows, I can probably go to the appropriate reddit or something.
Very much with you! The only reason I ever moved on from my Droid X back in the day was because it slowed down with all of its updates, as they do. Same with everything but my precious Nexus 6, which is the only phone I've ever dropped and actually had the screen crack, which is why I'm on my PH-1 now.

Curiously, are you talking about the G Suite encrypted apps? You can use pretty much any Android phone with those, particularly modern ones that run a newer version of Android that requires encryption of the device. There are also various ways to wall off apps that don't include having to run an entire Linux suite on your device. I guess the real question is what are the requirements for your org?
 

Crayon

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,545
Very much with you! The only reason I ever moved on from my Droid X back in the day was because it slowed down with all of its updates, as they do. Same with everything but my precious Nexus 6, which is the only phone I've ever dropped and actually had the screen crack, which is why I'm on my PH-1 now.

Curiously, are you talking about the G Suite encrypted apps? You can use pretty much any Android phone with those, particularly modern ones that run a newer version of Android that requires encryption of the device. There are also various ways to wall off apps that don't include having to run an entire Linux suite on your device. I guess the real question is what are the requirements for your org?
They're definitely not too uptight about it. I know it's a duplicate set of all the usual Google apps with little padlocks on them. And then one additional one, an authenticator.

They usually install that right on your factory Android, but i want to try running Linux on a phone for funsies. problem is, I don't know the first thing about how that works. I don't know how Android apps are handled on something like Kali Linux. I don't know if they're native, or what.
 

riverfr0zen

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,441
Manhattan, New York
Hey there, I'm running i3-gaps with Arch Linux and Steam runs pretty nicely. I've only switched from Gnome to i3 two weeks ago and the configuration wasn't too bad, but Regolith or its custom libraries a try if you just want something that looks nice while also having i3's advantages. It's noticeably snappy, and even when I run a game in fullscreen, I'm able to switch to another workspace.
Did you find any i3 communities that you found particularly active/responsive/useful?
 

spool

Member
Oct 27, 2017
328
32bit needs to go sooner or later. And since the problem with games breaking won't change with time, why not now. I don't think how it affects a third party store for closed source games is even on Canonical's radar, and why would it be? Their focus should be on the good of Linux and the OS they're making.

Valve could just lump the libraries together and ship them with Steam.