Google - GDC 2019 Teaser

What do you think Google’s gaming hardware will be?

  • Actual console

    Votes: 147 10.0%
  • Streaming box

    Votes: 791 53.6%
  • Both

    Votes: 498 33.7%
  • Controller

    Votes: 41 2.8%

  • Total voters
    1,477
Oct 25, 2017
2,479
I hope it doesn’t play games locally, I want this to be focused on streaming to get the point across that streaming works and this is the place you go for the best streaming system

Give me a 10$ - 15$ sub that can be canceled anytime I want
 
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Oct 25, 2017
3,084
If it is a traditional console then Google legitimately has a chance imo.

Also, if Google decides to partner with Nvidia for the GPU and has the only console on the market capable of hardware-based raytracing...

As awesome as that would be, I don't think you're going to get that in a $399 box at this stage.
 
Oct 27, 2017
421
Seeing as there is 99% chance I will be buying a PS5 and can’t afford a second console, I’d like this to be a streaming service. Especially if it has interesting exclusives.
 
Nov 22, 2017
1,994
So, extra high resolution VR display news from Google and LG last year and a patent for "foveated compression" was published a couple months ago:
https://uploadvr.com/google-foveated-compression/

The patent explains that in a standalone headset, the data lanes from the SoC (system-on-chip) to the display have limited bandwidth. Increasing this banwdith would have a non-trivial effect on energy consumption. Specifications like DisplayPort include an optional compression system already, however the algorithms behind it were not designed for elements of varying visual acuity in a single frame.

The new compression system described gives priority to elements within the high detail area, where the result should be “virtually lossless”. Combining the high and low detail images without visible artefacts is described as requiring a custom chip. Thankfully however this chip is described as “relatively simple”.
 
Feb 17, 2019
26
Haven't they done a $100 million deal with a Chinese publisher?
They also trademarked Matter which might be the name of their NetEase game. On the other hand I would expect Destiny 2 to start showing up on streaming services soon as the Activision deal is ending.

Atlus Fantasy RPG on this thing would definitely sell me on it, but I am still hoping for original massively online experiences that streaming can provide or maybe some really cool high end grfx demo. The prototype joystick on youtube does not look that good though.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,163
Amsterdam
I'm mostly interested in Sega's involvement. I mean they're the only major studio force that are "partnering" on this new console, correct? And Google's specifically interested in reviving Sega's legacy IPs? Like are they partnering with them as in Sonic Pocket Adventure on the Neo Geo Pocket Color - or are they partnering with them as in Jet Set Radio 3 is an exclusive? Either way I'm marking my calendar for next week. Very interested to see what Google has on the horizon.
SONIC: the movie - the game
 
Oct 26, 2017
1,459
Writing in the Forxa xCloud demo thread, it got me thinking that Google might enforce a mandatory minimum framerate for games on their platform. Or at least mandatory performance modes at high framerates.

Though there would be trade offs in that, this would be a useful advantage for streaming compared to services serving content that isn’t necessarily high FPS all the time. It would certainly plant their flag in the ground as a streaming-first platform. And as a nice side effect, it might be a nice attraction for parts of the market if they are doing a full fat local console, at least until other next gen consoles swing around.
 
Nov 2, 2017
1,216
This is definitely intriguing. Some thoughts;

I think all three console manufacturers are at risk if the rumors are true and Google are serious about tackling gaming with a multi-tiered approach.

For Nintendo, a big part of what makes the Switch such an appealing platform despite some of its shortcomings is the ability to provide a true console-like experience on the go. If Google gets most of the big publishers on board and their streaming solution is reliable enough for the average gamer on a mobile device, be it a smartphone or tablet, then the Switch could lose quite a bit of its appeal. With a business model that relies primarily on their own exclusive IP, Nintendo are well equipped to stabilize into a profitable niche after such a disruption but the Switch would go back to being a Nintendo box and probably end up somewhere around GBA/3DS numbers at best instead of potentially rocketing past 100 M. They would also need to reinvent themselves again with their next system rather than simply improve on the hybrid concept.

Sony has a vested interest in keeping the traditional TV box model going for as long as they can. This is their area of expertise, and all of their gaming initiatives that tried to deviate from the blueprint established by the PS1 have been middling successes at best. Unlike Nintendo, much of the appeal of Sony consoles comes from third parties - if the Google console/streaming service becomes a viable home for the likes of FIFA and GTA, then quite a few people who don't really care for Sony's first-party may opt for the Google platform instead, especially when you consider things like Android integration. Another thing to consider is that Google has the means to establish a robust distribution network outside of North America, Western Europe and East Asia, areas where Sony basically wins just by showing up. Moreover, if the streaming experience on a stationary console becomes good enough for the average gamer, Sony could be in trouble as their cloud computing infrastructure lags far behind Google's and especially Microsoft's.

Microsoft may have the highest likelihood of being made obsolete by Google due to how similar their rumored approach is to xCloud and Scarlett but they also have a better chance at competing with Google due to how similar they are as a company. If cloud gaming takes off, then Microsoft already has a massive cloud computing platform at their disposal in Azure, second only to AWS. They are still one of the wealthiest tech giants in the world and will spend aggressively to prevent Google from gaining too much ground in the streaming market if necessary. Unlike Nintendo or Sony, Microsoft has no problem with, and even welcomes a streaming future. A gaming market disrupted by streaming is the preferred outcome for them because unlike the hardware race, the streaming race is one where they actually have a chance at winning.

On Google's side, I think they will have to bring their A-game to gain a sizable foothold in the industry, much like Microsoft did in with the original Xbox and the 360. This isn't a PS1 situation where hundreds of third party studios were stuck between Nintendo's tyranny and Sega's incompetence and could easily be swayed with CDs, good development tools and some money. All three console manufacturers know their market and have good relationships with their third party partners. Their hardware will need to be top-notch, their streaming reliable and their library at least somewhat comparable with everyone else's.
This was a good write-up, thank you for your opinion.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,374
Even if there is hardware, bear in mind that Google's approach to literally ever single piece of hardware in recent years has been to have market-standard specs backed up by software and AI. If there's something remarkable about a Google console, it won't be raw power.
 

RagdollRhino

Banned
Member
Oct 10, 2018
950
If its an actual console, I'd say the chances of us getting shittier ports is possible. In 4 years we'll have at least two versions of Google, Xbox, and PS5. 6 consoles with different specs. Even as it is now with 4 consoles, some devs don't use the hardware, Ace Combat 7 for example and others
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,071
Toronto
I mentioned this earlier but I really have no confidence in Google supporting products long-term.

These are two news stories that just came out today
- Google Allo officially shuts down
- Google has told dozens of employees on its laptop and tablet division to find new jobs at the company, raising questions about its hardware plans
- Google is killing Inbox

I also don't trust Google's hardware whatsoever.
- The Nexus 5 and 6P had numerous hardware issues, specifically with boot loops
- My Google Pixel (and others) had a data drain issue until Android Oreo was released
- The Google Pixel 3 has a ton of buggy software, specifically with the camera

While I get it's exciting having a new player in the market, the issues I've faced with Google's hardware in the past, bundled with the fact that they like to give up on their products after a few years doesn't really invoke confidence in me about their gaming plans. I'm aware we know next to nothing about what this is, but I'm less likely to invest my own money in this given the numerous examples of Google giving up halfway through a product's life cycle.
 
Dec 21, 2017
5,399
Even if there is hardware, bear in mind that Google's approach to literally ever single piece of hardware in recent years has been to have market-standard specs backed up by software and AI. If there's something remarkable about a Google console, it won't be raw power.
Pixelbook, Pixel phones and most Nexus phones are all high-end products.
 
Dec 21, 2017
5,399
I mentioned this earlier but I really have no confidence in Google supporting products long-term.

These are two news stories that just came out today
- Google Allo officially shuts down
- Google has told dozens of employees on its laptop and tablet division to find new jobs at the company, raising questions about its hardware plans
- Google is killing Inbox

I also don't trust Google's hardware whatsoever.
- The Nexus 5 and 6P had numerous hardware issues, specifically with boot loops
- My Google Pixel (and others) had a data drain issue until Android Oreo was released
- The Google Pixel 3 has a ton of buggy software, specifically with the camera

While I get it's exciting having a new player in the market, the issues I've faced with Google's hardware in the past, bundled with the fact that they like to give up on their products after a few years doesn't really invoke confidence in me about their gaming plans. I'm aware we know next to nothing about what this is, but I'm less likely to invest my own money in this given the numerous examples of Google giving up halfway through a product's life cycle.
Google Allo like other projects at Google have never been a serious one: you have to understand the philosophy at Google. They have pillar projects that are extremely successful and where Google is fully committed to support, and there are little projects literally made by a small group of employees who had an idea and the company let them do their thing.

- Search, Chrome, Foto, Assistant, Gmail, Android,... these are the pillars.

- Allo, Duo, Google+, Daydream,... are either smaller projects Google had no expectations, or failed attempts.

We'll have to see where their gaming projects are going to fall, it's too early to declare success or failure, at least wait until they announce the thing.

Nexus phones are not manufactured by Google but by their partners, in those cases you mentioned LG and Huawei respectively. LG phones are notoriously known to have boot loops.

We have seen data drain issues on many phones, including iPhones, not just Pixel phone.

Finally i can't speak about Pixel 3 software since i haven't bought it, but the Google Camera is regarded as one of the best camera app with one of the best algorithms, we've seen major improvements using it especially on Xiaomi phones.
 

RagdollRhino

Banned
Member
Oct 10, 2018
950
I mentioned this earlier but I really have no confidence in Google supporting products long-term.

These are two news stories that just came out today
- Google Allo officially shuts down
- Google has told dozens of employees on its laptop and tablet division to find new jobs at the company, raising questions about its hardware plans
- Google is killing Inbox

I also don't trust Google's hardware whatsoever.
- The Nexus 5 and 6P had numerous hardware issues, specifically with boot loops
- My Google Pixel (and others) had a data drain issue until Android Oreo was released
- The Google Pixel 3 has a ton of buggy software, specifically with the camera

While I get it's exciting having a new player in the market, the issues I've faced with Google's hardware in the past, bundled with the fact that they like to give up on their products after a few years doesn't really invoke confidence in me about their gaming plans. I'm aware we know next to nothing about what this is, but I'm less likely to invest my own money in this given the numerous examples of Google giving up halfway through a product's life cycle.

They will hire people with gaming industry experience, not pull people over from failed unrelated hardware projects to work on a console. Sony games division for example was successful while the rest of the company was slipping hard. Theres a separation there for sure. For example someone that worked on a shit flatscreen for Sony won't be engineering the ps5.
It's all about who they hire because they have the money. Doesn't mean they will successful either though.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,374
Pixelbook, Pixel phones and most Nexus phones are all high-end products.
Yes, and they are priced as such, but in hardware terms, they meet the current standard of excellence or slightly skimp on it. Pixel phones compete with iPhones as a complete service, but not as a hardware product.
 
Dec 21, 2017
5,399
Yes, and they are priced as such, but in hardware terms, they meet the current standard of excellence or slightly skimp on it. Pixel phones compete with iPhones as a complete service, but not as a hardware product.
Specs are comparable with iPhone actually, better in certain aspects.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,415
I wouldn't be surprised if they did announce one following GDC.
Yea it would make sense honestly. Assuming they are serious about gaming and are actually releasing an somewhat expensive box.

Next week do like a teaser conference where you show off the hardware and a few games. Then show some slides of devs who are on board.

And then tell everyone to tune into their E3 show for a full blowout on all the games etc. Kinda like MS did with Xbox one reveal. They talked tv tv hardware stuff in early May irrc and next month did a games only conference.
 
Nov 6, 2017
205
With the money they own, they can easily invest in exclusives games from third-party studios. It'll be interesting to see what are theirs projects, they could become a big actor in this market.
 
Oct 29, 2017
1,137
My guess is that it will be a streaming service. Maybe they'll put out their own streaming stick hardware but it'll also be on whatever they can put it on. It'll be a robust service though with some significant exclusives that will make some people mad. That's my final answer, I guess.
 
May 25, 2018
2,333
If it is streaming, it has no chance in emerging markets. Internet quality + latency just kills the whole thing.
As good as project stream is, it's really just not good enough to have its own dedicated service that people pay for. If they have that in addition to a console then sure why not but if it's just streaming, it won't work out.
 
Oct 26, 2017
7,491
We had a hint that it wasn't a console, you know. Someone in here gave us a hint. Even knowing that, I've been leaning towards console, which is dumb.

So maybe it's something just a bit like a console. Some kind of chunk of hardware. Couple hundred bucks. Has gaming functionality at the forefront. Ships with controller.

So what would make it not a console? If it can run full on chrome browser and it's tailored around making that a good living room experience?

Maybe it's more like a platform that you can use to run games locally on any PC, but then with a line of machines like reference models?

Maybe it's more open and would allow sideloading and development on it?

I have no idea. I'm trying to think of things that are more than a streaming stick but not quite a console.
 
Nov 15, 2017
1,175
"Hardware" probably just means an HDMI streaming stick and a controller.
Not even that. An app on Google's Play Store. They'll sell a gamepad but any controller should work. They might produce some exclusive titles, but nothing too big. Focus is on creating the platform, kinda like Steam but for streaming.