Google Stadia Pro (4K/60, 5.1 surround) $9.99 a month. Stadia Base (1080/60) requires no subscription.

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gameongreggy

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Oct 25, 2017
508
So I'm confused, when I get my Stadia with Pro, I can't play in a browser yet, only on TV, but with a buddy pass I can play in browser? Bizarre if that's true
 

Castia

Member
Oct 27, 2017
346
I’m interested to see how it works. It’s an amazing technology if done right.

Look, it feels like this is going to struggle. It’s bizarre how little hype/advertising is behind this thing, I read most game sites and struggle to find info on it but I hope it does well.

I’ll give it a months subscription and see how it plays on release. The launch catalogue isn’t amazing but then again few are these days so I’m willing to give it time.
 

riverfr0zen

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Oct 27, 2017
1,797
Manhattan, New York

TangFei

Banned
Aug 18, 2019
179
GRID is going to have a 40 car mode on Stadia that's "just not possible on other hardware"

Stadia will really shine on its features that are only possible on cloud computing. Can’t wait to see more of this especially with their exclusives.
 

klauskpm

Member
Oct 26, 2017
595
What other games do we know will have exclusive features/improvements on Stadia? I know Football Manager 2020 and Ghost Recon Breakpoint will too.
 

thebishop

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Nov 10, 2017
1,952
Right, I was just curious how much work it would be to get games built on DirectX to run on Vulkan/OpenGL.
Directx12 to Vulkan seems to be pretty straightforward, Dx11/OpenGL to Vulkan seems like a bigger overhaul.

I'm interested to know if Google will have a Stadia optimized build of Wine/Proton to help with this.
 

riverfr0zen

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,797
Manhattan, New York
Directx12 to Vulkan seems to be pretty straightforward, Dx11/OpenGL to Vulkan seems like a bigger overhaul.

I'm interested to know if Google will have a Stadia optimized build of Wine/Proton to help with this.
Do you mean you expect that Google will let developers use Wine/Proton to "port" their Windows games over to Stadia? I don't think they would allow that, unless I am very mistaken. Or do you mean something else?

Edit: I guess they could use/repurpose/roll their own "vkd3d", but somehow I feel they will require developers to directly build for Vulkan.
 
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thebishop

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Nov 10, 2017
1,952
Do you mean you expect that Google will let developers use Wine/Proton to "port" their Windows games over to Stadia? I don't think they would allow that, unless I am very mistaken. Or do you mean something else?

Edit: I guess they could use/repurpose/roll their own "vkd3d", but somehow I feel they will require developers to directly build for Vulkan.
I basically mean that they would have a fork of proton optimized for streaming available to developers. I dont see why it would be prohibited, it's still up to the publisher to test and guarantee compatibility.
 
Feb 10, 2018
15,973
It's really disappointing Google did not get or make an exclusive stadia game, they really missed a trick here, it would of been a way to get a years headstart on "next gen".

Glyt looks good, but it'd not a next gen game.
 
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III-V

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,111
It's really disappointing Google did not get or make an exclusive stadia game, they really missed a trick here, it would of been a way to get a years headstart on "next gen".

I don't know how anyone at the stadia team can be happy with the state of the exclusives..

I'm mean come folks it's a gaming platform launch without exclusives... What the hell are they thinking.
Gylt is a launch Stadia exclusive.

 
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Bumrush

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,401
So if I have a laptop with a 950M in it and a really good internet connection, I can play Stadia games in 1080/60 with a wired 360 controller in 2020?
 

Zelus

Member
Oct 27, 2017
670
Directx12 to Vulkan seems to be pretty straightforward, Dx11/OpenGL to Vulkan seems like a bigger overhaul.

I'm interested to know if Google will have a Stadia optimized build of Wine/Proton to help with this.
I think developers will be the only ones to know. I doubt they’ll ever release that information to the public.
 

Dezzy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
898
USA
Stadia will really shine on its features that are only possible on cloud computing. Can’t wait to see more of this especially with their exclusives.
We'll see, but 40 players in a game is nothing to brag about. EverQuest had hundreds of players in a single raid back in 1999 over dial-up connections. Modern games can have hundreds of players with tons of stuff going on just fine.
There's also nothing stopping consoles from using "cloud computing" just like Stadia does.
 
Feb 10, 2018
15,973
Gylt is a launch Stadia exclusive.

That looks quite good, I like tequila works.
But what I meant was having a game built from the ground up for Stadia hardware, the first "next gen" game, like how ryse and killzone: SF were some of the first "next gen" games this gen.
I think it would of really helped them having somthing far beyond what the competition currently has.
 

Nif

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Oct 25, 2017
368
So if I have a laptop with a 950M in it and a really good internet connection, I can play Stadia games in 1080/60 with a wired 360 controller in 2020?
I don't see why not.

I'm personally hyped to get my kit. I preordered right after the initial announcement, so I'm expecting to get mine next week. Personally, the ease of launching into a game immediately with a voice command (not sure if that'll be available day 1) with 60fps standard is a huge draw for me. PC gaming with a single PC on my TV is too cumbersome, and I'm sick of updating consoles to play in 30fps. The ability to play from any of my devices no matter their specs, and the potential of the service is really interesting to me as well. I have a pretty beefy PC with a 1080, but if Destiny 2 controls well enough, I'll definitely buy RDR2 and Gylt on Stadia (and wait for a RDR2 Steam sale down the road).
 

Bumrush

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,401
I don't see why not.

I'm personally hyped to get my kit. I preordered right after the initial announcement, so I'm expecting to get mine next week. Personally, the ease of launching into a game immediately with a voice command (not sure if that'll be available day 1) with 60fps standard is a huge draw for me. PC gaming with a single PC on my TV is too cumbersome, and I'm sick of updating consoles to play in 30fps. The ability to play from any of my devices no matter their specs, and the potential of the service is really interesting to me as well. I have a pretty beefy PC with a 1080, but if Destiny 2 controls well enough, I'll definitely buy RDR2 and Gylt on Stadia (and wait for a RDR2 Steam sale down the road).
yeah the potential is incredibly exciting
 

RowdyReverb

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,292
Texas
Sorry if it’s been asked, but have they announced a free trial or anything to test how well Stadia works with your home connection? Project Stream worked just OK for me, but I’ve upgraded my network since then
 

klauskpm

Member
Oct 26, 2017
595
I’m sure they will do something, but I don’t think it’s been announced yet
John Justice, VP, Head of Product at Stadia, confirmed it at an interview on Stadiacast. There will be free trials for both Stadia and games.

And just a reminder for everybody: Stadia will hold another AMA on Reddit on November 13th at 10 AM PST and, if everything goes right, there will be a second interview with John Justice on Stadiacast this Thursday, November 14th.

Here is the first interview, if you are interested in seeing it:

But here is a comprehensive list from u/pcigre on his post on Reddit:
  • Buddy pass - coming probably in first 2 weeks
  • The gamepad doesn't have gyro
  • Gamepads with extra paddles - bring your own
  • Demos and trials (both of platform and games) - high on the priority list, coming in couple months
  • F2P - no info yet
  • Uplay+ - no info yet
  • Family sharing - work in progress, trying to figure it out, coming early 2020
  • Streaming overlays - not coming anytime soon. Pro streamers pointed to current solutions.
  • Gamescom internet provided per station was about 25Mbit, PAX West a bit lower
  • Parental controls, time limits - work in progress, couple months
  • Mods - working on it! A different situation from game to game
  • Save files - working on it. Tricky with games with cheating and multiplayer
  • Next-gen - all about openness
  • Controller battery - maybe more than PS4
  • They are watching Stadiacast and this Reddit and see it as a source for community feedback.
 

Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,905
We'll see, but 40 players in a game is nothing to brag about. EverQuest had hundreds of players in a single raid back in 1999 over dial-up connections. Modern games can have hundreds of players with tons of stuff going on just fine.
There's also nothing stopping consoles from using "cloud computing" just like Stadia does.
Those games are bad comparisons - they aren't realtime racing simulators with heavy physics systems. Grid 2 supported just 12 concurrent drivers, they needed something about Stadia to increase that to 40.
 

XR.

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,576
People often highlight price and affordability when it comes to streaming, and now Stadia specifically.

What I don't understand is, how are the hardware components/servers monetized? I mean, streaming still requires the required hardware to run games, obviously, but at the same time it's supposed to be a financial non-factor somehow. Is there a reason for this?

Not only that but streaming should logically increase costs since you not only require the hardware for the rendering process; you need a whole network for delivery and adapted code for each and individual game.

How is this monetized in the long run? Even if it becomes as popular as Netflix, you'll still have insane costs to account for. More than Netflix even, since rendering games is a much more demanding process than movies.
 
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Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,905
People often highlights price and affordability when it comes to streaming, and Stadia specifically.

What I don't understand is, how are the hardware/servers monetized? I mean, streaming still requires the required hardware to run games, obviously, but at the same time it's supposed to be a financial non-factor somehow.

Not only that but streaming should logically increase cost since you not only require the hardware for the rendering process; you need a whole network and adapted code for each and individual game.

How is this monetized in the long run?
They get a cut of every game sold on the service. With a bit extra from Stadia Pro subscribers.
 

XR.

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,576
They get a cut of every game sold on the service.
As do Steam, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo.

And I doubt that would cover all hardware and server expenses. Sony could give away free consoles and hope they would recoup the expenses with a 30% cut on all games but that's obviously not viable. I'm not sure if that scenario is too far off either, since this service is supposed to offer a standard much higher than any console.
 
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Dreamwriter

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Oct 27, 2017
3,905
As do Steam, Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo.

And I doubt that would cover all hardware and server expenses. Sony could give away free consoles and hope they would recoup the expenses with a 30% cut on all games but that's obviously not viable. I'm not sure if that scenario is too far off either, since this service is supposed to offer a standard much higher than any console.
Yeah, it's how Valve is so rich :) Sony and Microsoft already subsidize their consoles with the licensing fees (Nintendo has made a point that they don't like to do so). Not 100%, but it allows for more powerful hardware without making the consoles too pricey for the average gamer. Google has an advantage, one console can be used for multiple users and they don't have to have custom cases or BluRay drives, they don't have to be quiet, can use external cooling.
 

XR.

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,576
Yeah, it's how Valve is so rich :) Sony and Microsoft already subsidize their consoles with the licensing fees (Nintendo has made a point that they don't like to do so). Not 100%, but it allows for more powerful hardware without making the consoles too pricey for the average gamer. Google has an advantage, one console can be used for multiple users and they don't have to have custom cases or BluRay drives, they don't have to be quiet, can use external cooling.
They did last generation, but not the current one.

But even if that was the case, we're talking about a small percentage of each game to recoup manufacture and R&D expenses. In the case of Stadia it has to account for 100% of all expenses. That's another ballpark entirely.
 

Dreamwriter

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,905
They did last generation, but not the current one.

But even if that was the case, we're talking about a small percentage of each game to recoup manufacture and R&D expenses. In the case of Stadia it has to account for 100% of all expenses. That's another ballpark entirely.
Not 100% - like I said, there is Stadia Pro, and controller sales (remember that their controllers will have a latency advantage over normal controllers). And the 30% of whatever they charge developers can add up pretty quickly when they only need a few consoles for a couple dozen players.

But also, I wouldn't be surprised if they are pulling a Microsoft - MS launched the Xbox with the knowledge they would lose $1 billion or more on it. They sold each unit for a loss, spent tons and tons on R&D, bought Bungie, knew they would have a hard time competing from the start, etc. The plan was that they would apply anything they learned to the Xbox followup, sell that as a real competitive console, and make up the losses there. And the Xbox 360 definitely did that.

So Stadia might start out as a big loss, but over time the sales will start to make up for that, and since they have full control over the hardware and software, they can actually tweak the service in realtime to make it better, more popular, more profitable. And "next gen" they only need to upgrade certain parts of the hardware, many parts of it will be able to be reused.
 

XR.

Member
Nov 22, 2018
1,576
Not 100% - like I said, there is Stadia Pro, and controller sales (remember that their controllers will have a latency advantage over normal controllers). And the 30% of whatever they charge developers can add up pretty quickly when they only need a few consoles for a couple dozen players.

But also, I wouldn't be surprised if they are pulling a Microsoft - MS launched the Xbox with the knowledge they would lose $1 billion or more on it. They sold each unit for a loss, spent tons and tons on R&D, bought Bungie, knew they would have a hard time competing from the start, etc. The plan was that they would apply anything they learned to the Xbox followup, sell that as a real competitive console, and make up the losses there. And the Xbox 360 definitely did that.

So Stadia might start out as a big loss, but over time the sales will start to make up for that, and since they have full control over the hardware and software, they can actually tweak the service in realtime to make it better, more popular, more profitable. And "next gen" they only need to upgrade certain parts of the hardware, many parts of it will be able to be reused.
That's a good point about not needing one "PC" per consumer.

And yeah, I don't think they're counting on being profitable day one. It's just that I don't see them being profitable any time soon, but I digress. I don't understand the math behind it all, I can only surmise it's a hell of a tall order.
 

ImaLawy3r

Member
Jun 6, 2019
231
Yeah, it's how Valve is so rich :) Sony and Microsoft already subsidize their consoles with the licensing fees (Nintendo has made a point that they don't like to do so). Not 100%, but it allows for more powerful hardware without making the consoles too pricey for the average gamer. Google has an advantage, one console can be used for multiple users and they don't have to have custom cases or BluRay drives, they don't have to be quiet, can use external cooling.
Also, this is Google; server infrastructure isn kind of their thing. So is data processing. Stadia might be a cog in a larger plan; the infrastructure side of things.
 

deadfolk

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,713
Directx12 to Vulkan seems to be pretty straightforward, Dx11/OpenGL to Vulkan seems like a bigger overhaul.

I'm interested to know if Google will have a Stadia optimized build of Wine/Proton to help with this.
I'm sure they must have something to ease the transition. I can't see Ubisoft doing a full port of enough games to make Uplay + viable, so there is likely something to help with that.
It's really disappointing Google did not get or make an exclusive stadia game, they really missed a trick here, it would of been a way to get a years headstart on "next gen".

I don't know how anyone at the stadia team can be happy with the state of the exclusives..

I'm mean come folks it's a gaming platform launch without exclusives... What the hell are they thinking.
But this isn't the launch. It would be a total waste to have a big exclusive now. A handful of us early adopters would play it and all hype would have dissipated by the time of the real launch.

Now, if they don't have something up their sleeves by then... well, that's another story.
So if I have a laptop with a 950M in it and a really good internet connection, I can play Stadia games in 1080/60 with a wired 360 controller in 2020?
Yep. Or before if you can snag a buddy pass.
 

pcigre

Member
Aug 19, 2019
73
But this isn't the launch. It would be a total waste to have a big exclusive now. A handful of us early adopters would play it and all hype would have dissipated by the time of the real launch.
Now, if they don't have something up their sleeves by then... well, that's another story.
I don't expect them to have any kind of 1st party exclusive for Stadia Base release date.
 
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