Guitar |OT| If you stick with it, you're gonna be rewarded

Neo0mj

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,726


History



The Guitar is a musical instrument with a rich history. Most likely descended from the Lute and the Gittern, the first time it appeared in a form similar to what we know today was during the renascence, though during that period it only had around four strings and eight frets, though there was not a set standard and some luthiers deviated from that.
It was in the 19th century when a Spanish luthier by the name of Antonia de Torres Jurado built what is now known as the modern guitar. Through intense research and significant trial and error, he managed to make significant breakthroughs in guitar design in order to get the most sound, clarity, and volume out of a guitar. While improvements were made after his passing by others, none revolutionized it as he did.



Even since it became possible to easily manipulate electricity, specialists in many fields tried to use it to advance their work, and luthiers were no exception. The earliest known attempts of using electricity to manipulate sound in a stringed instrument date back to the early 20th century, where patents showed designs of modified telephone transmitters fitted within violins and banjos, though these were used mostly by hobbyists and produced weak sound.
The first commercial electric guitar was designed and built by George Beauchamp and his team at the National Guitar Corporation, which later became known as Rickenbacker. It was a hollow bodied acoustic instrument carved from maple cast in aluminum and used tungsten pickups, and was known as the frying pan. They were soon followed with companies who had their own twist on the design such as Dobro and Gibson.
The Electric Guitar as we know it today is often credited to have been popularized and made viable first by Fender’s Telecaster in the early 1950s, though there is heavy debate and confusion regarding this matter. They were soon followed by Gibson with the popular Les Paul. A factor that led to their widespread use at the time was the popularity of big bands and the need of guitar players of louder volume from their instrument as the sound of classical acoustic guitars was often drowned out during performance by other musical instruments. This was also why electric bass were popularized.



Picking a Guitar


Despite popular opinion, starting with an acoustic Guitar is not a must when learning guitar. Each has its own set of positive and negatives.



Acoustic Positives:
  • Generally cheaper to buy.
  • Easier to pick up and play and doesn’t have much that need tinkering with.
  • Requires little in the way of accessories and extensions.
  • Not as noisy as an electric guitar when the latter is played through an amp.
  • Your mistakes are not masked like when playing an electric guitar so you can make better notes or where you’re going wrong when practicing.

Acoustic Negatives:
  • Can be more difficult to play at the start due to its shape and requiring more strength from the player when strumming and holding chords.
  • Not as versatile or customizable as its electric counterpart.
  • Are larger than Electric and so are harder to store and a bit more difficult to hold.



Electric Positives:
  • Easier on a beginner to start with.
  • Offers a much wider selection of designs for those looking for an aesthetically pleasing guitar.
  • Can create a rainbow of sounds thanks to the many ways music can be manipulated before exiting an amp through the use of certain hardware.
  • Are generally more durable than acoustic guitars.
  • Can be practiced with unplugged or while wearing headphones to almost eliminate noise entirely.

Electric Negatives:
  • Tend to be more expensive than their acoustic counterparts.
  • Requires the use of cables and an amp, which adds a degree of hassle to playing it.
  • The variety of options and setting might be overwhelming when trying to find the right tone.

Personal opinion, just pick the one that matches the style of music you like.

Heading to the Market


There are several factors that you should take into mind when buying an acoustic guitar. First among them is size and shape. While not as varied as an electric guitar it still comes in all sort of forms. One of the most popular is the Dreadnought. It’s of average size and is very versatile, syncing well with many styles of music. Regardless of what shape you choose, make sure that it can sit comfortably between your chest and strumming and that you can hold the neck using your chord hand without struggling.

Another thing to keep in mind is what kind of string the guitar uses. Most acoustic guitars use steel strings, however some are equipped with nylon string instead. These are classical style acoustic guitars and have a wider neck and a shorter fretboard than their steel stringed counterparts. They're easier on the fingers and have a wider variety of tone. Please note that these two while both acoustic guitars are still technically different instruments and so their parts, mainly the strings, are not interchangeable and are played a little different.

Something you might want to consider when buying an acoustic guitar is if it’s an acoustic-electric guitar. They’re equipped with a preamp and pickup which allow you to connect them to an amplifier and other electronic devices without compromising their original sound.

And lastly price. While if you’re a beginner you won’t need a $1,000 guitar don’t buy something too cheap like for $25 or so.

Other things to keep in mind, such as:
  • What kind of machine head it has. Locking are preferable but they’re pretty expensive.
  • Whether it’s solid body or laminate.
  • What kind of wood was it constructed from.
  • That there are no cracks or splits.
  • Check the action, space between the neck and the string. It should generally look even across the neck.
  • If you’re a beginner ask a friend or someone there to play the guitar for you. It can help get a better feel of the sound.



A lot of what was said above regarding shape, size, wood type, and action can be applied here, so I’ll mostly go through what’s unique to electric guitars.
While it’s tempting to buy the coolest looking electric guitar you find, I wouldn’t recommend picking up something V-shaped or Explorer-like if you’re a beginner, they can be rather unwieldy. Instead look or something shaped like the Les Paul or the Stratocaster.

Electric guitars come in two body types, solid and hollow. Solid is the most popular kind and is what’s recommended for beginners. They come in all sorts of shapes and forms, and most parts and tools are designed with them in mind. Hollow body guitars are like their name implies, hollow, and the sound they produce has more resonance and feedback. They’re more limited design-wise and generally are more expensive. Like with

Another thing to keep in mind is what kind of pickups the guitar uses. There are two kinds of pickups, which single-coils and humbuckers. While I mention that some are preferred by certain styles over the other, it doesn’t mean you have to use that certain pick-up form as many guitar players buck the trend.
Single-coils came first and are characterized with their bright, snappy, and some might say thin sound. Singles are also know to make a continues static “hum” sound when left idle. They’re popular with funk, country, and pop players.
On the other hand, Humbuckers are known for their warm, thick sound, but are criticized by some for being too muddy. In contrast to single coils they don’t have a hum, which is where they got their name from. They’re especially popular with metal players but also hard rock and jazz players.
The number of pickups in an electric guitar can vary. Some only have one while others come with two or even three pickups to get more sound out of it. Guitars that come with three pickups usually have either three single coils or two singles and a humbucker. I’ll be discussing these in more depth later.

Something you might want to consider when buying an electric guitar is whether it has a tremolo/whamy bar or not. It allows you to play around with the sound it makes and generally has no negatives, though some designs might make it a little awkward to play near the bridge.

After finding out which guitar you like, it’s time to plug it into the amp. Buying a good amp is just as important as buying a good guitar. There are Solid-state and combo amps. The former is recommended for beginners and home as they’re often cheaper and easier to use, as well as less noisy. Combo amps are usually used by performers. Due to the variety of factors that impact their sound try multiple guitars with multiple amps and see what works best for you.

If you have some extra cash left after buying a guitar and amp you might want to look into buying a pedal. These allow you to add a plethora of effects to the sound, such as distortion, reverb, fuzz, and chorus.

Recommendations Form


So you set out to buy a guitar but are overwhelmed with the choices? Don't worry the members here are happy to help I think). just fill out the below form.

Guitar Type: Acoustic or Electric. Might to be more specific such as Classic Acoustic of Solid Electric.
Skill level: beginner, intermediate, or expert.
Preferred sound: If you have a certain tone in mind this can help narrow down your choices, especially with electric.
Planned use: Practice or stage.
Budget: How much you're willing to spend.
Country of residence: Would make giving options easier.
Misc: for other demands such as if you want something with a wider neck, tremolo, or other things that come to mind.

Resources

While you’ll definitely learn faster with an instructor, there are several other ways of learning how to play guitar now. Among the most popular are:

  • Justin Guitar: Originally mean to offer private lessons, Justin Sandercoe eventually offered all sorts of free courses on his website. Lots of useful information and products are available there.
  • Gibson’s Learn Guitar E-Book: Pretty useful book to read for those who prefer that to watching videos.
  • Rocksmith 2014: Guitar Hero with actual guitars, and available on PS4/X1/PC. Aside from being able to play your favorite songs it offers exercises and lessons as well. You’ll need a special cable to use it. For those without consoles the PC version runs on almost any device.
  • Yousician: Similar to Rocksmith but allows for the use of more instruments as it picks up audio using the mic. Don’t have much experience with it personally so I’d appreciate it if someone could help me explain its use better. Available for IOS/Android/PC.
  • Chordify: A service that breaks down any song you own into chords to read. Available for IOS/Android/PC.
  • Ultimate Guitar: An incredible selection of song tabs to learn here. Search for it and you’ll most likely find it.
  • Songsterr: Similair to the above, but more interactive and they even offer a mobile for IOS/Android so you can use it on the go.
  • Gametabs: I know this site has a lot of video game fans so I thought they might appreciate a site where they can learn their favorite tunes. Unfortunately it hasn’t been updated much recently so newer games might not have their music available.
  • Best Guitar Players on Youtube: A video that showcases some of the better talent on youtube. Check out some of them, as they have some tutorials and gear reviews.

Popular Brands




A family owned business from Pennsylvania with a long history. Their classic instruments are some of the most sought after in the market. They’re highly venerated and can cost tens of thousands of dollars.
Popular choices include the Martin D Jr., the Martin DC-15ME, and the Martin DXAE Black.




Known for making high quality acoustic and electric guitars, this company started from a small workshop in Michigan but are now headquartered in Tennessee. Known for devouring their rivals such as Epiphone, they offer guitars that fit all price ranges and tastes.
Popular choices include the Epiphone Les Paul 100, the Gibson HP 635 W, the Gibson Flying V T, the Epiphone Hummingbird Artist, and the Gibson Explorer T.




Hailing from California where they still make their guitars but now headquartered in Nevada, this company popularized the electric guitar and is highly regarded in that field. They also make acoustic guitars, but their reputation does not match their electric counterparts. They also bought popular electric guitar company Jackson, though they keep it separate from their own stuff.
Popular choices include the Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster '50, the Fender American Standard Stratocaster, the Fender Classic Series ’72 Telecaster Thinline, the Jackson USA Warrior WR1, and the Jackson Pro Series Rhoads RRMG.




Originally known as Gakki, they were simply a bookstore turned musical instrument shop in Nagoya, Japan. They later began importing guitars from a workshop owned by a luthier known as Salvador Ibanez. Eventually they rebranded themselves as Ibanez after buying the rights to the name in 1957 they started licensing electric guitars under their banner and even making some themselves, often clones of the more popular Gibson and Fender models until they were hit with a lawsuit. They were popularized in the west thanks to their custom guitars used by guitarists such as Steve Vai in the 1980s. It should be noted they don't really have many workshops themselves and most of their guitars are contracted to manufacturers in other countries.
Popular choices include the Ibanez S970WRW Premium, the Ibanez RG Kaoss, the Ibanez Artcore AF75TDG, the Ibanez Artwood AW4000, and the Ibanez AEG10II.




A Japanese conglomerate from Hamamatsu known for their presence in many fields, they entered the guitar market in 1966 and offer a large selection of products, fit for beginners and experts.
Popular choices include the Yamaha PAC012, the Yamaha CG192C, the Yamaha SLG200N, the Yamaha APX500III, and the Yamaha RS420.




A relatively modern company headquartered in Connecticut, they primarily focus on acoustic guitars and have an iconic look due to their round back. Due to financial troubles it was originally sold to Fenders but has been moving between parent companies.

Popular choices include the Ovation Elite TX Mid-Depth, the Ovation Custom Legend, and the Ovation Celebrity Standard Mid-Depth.




Founded by Robert Godin and few of his buddies in Montreal, Canada. They manufacture electric and acoustic guitars, and have a popular sub-brand known as Seagull which specializes in making Solid top acoustic guitars.
Popular choices include the Godin Session Custom '59, the Godin LGX-SA, the Godin A6 Ultra, the Seagull Entourage Rustic CW QIT, and the Seagull S6 Original.




Founded by Bob Taylor, Kurt Listug and Steve Schemmer at a young age in California at the year 1974, they eventually became the #1 manufacturer of acoustic guitars. While they mostly cater to the high-end market they have a few midrange offerings.
Popular choices include the Baby Mahogany, the GS Mini, and the 214ce.




Another you company. Headquartered in Maryland, USA, the company was founded by surprise, Paul Reed Smith (does any american company not name itself after its founder?), they were originally a custom guitar shop that offered high-end instruments, slowly started offering more relatively affordable guitars. Still, even their cheapest stuff can run you $500 so it definitely isn't meant for beginners.
Popular choices include the S2 Mira, S2 Starla,SE Standard 245, and the SE Custom 22.

Amps

Now that you have an electric (or acoustic electric) guitar, it's time to complete the second half of the equation with an amp. No matter how good a guitar is you won't make great music without an equivalent level amp. Amps are actually formed from two parts, a head and a cabinet. However for most personal use a combo amp is what's recommend, especially if you're a beginner or just practicing. Below are some of the most popular brands but once again there are merely samplings and there's more to find out there.




Making another appearance in this thread, Fender are also known for their amps which fit a wide variety of tastes and price range. Popular models include the Fender Frontman 10G and the Fender Vintage Reissue '65 Twin Reverb.




Popular models include the Marshall MG10CF and the Marshall JVM215C.




Popular models include the Blackstar ID:Core and the Blackstar HT-60.




Popular models include the Roland Cube-01 and the Roland JC-120.




Popular models include the Peavey VYPYR VIP 1 and the Peavey Classic 50.




Popular models include the Orange Crush12 and the Orange Crush Pro CR120C.
 
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zdravkelja

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,019
Serbia
I'm glad this was opened so fast. Can someone recommend me some good books for learning fingerstyle? I've had a guitar for a some time so I am not a total beginner, but the more I play, I'm more interested in learning fingerstyle, especially because I don't like using a pick very much. I also have a good foundation in music theor (I went to a music school when I was in elementary school), so I don't mind using notes instead of tabs.
 

CrudeDiatribe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
898
Eastern Canada
Can someone recommend me some good books for learning fingerstyle? I've had a guitar for a some time so I am not a total beginner, but the more I play, I'm more interested in learning fingerstyle, especially because I don't like using a pick very much.
Any particular sort of fingerstyle?

I'm probably not going to have a book recommendation since I'm mostly self & instructor taught with respect to finger style, but I can offer some tips.
 

ExMachina

Member
Oct 25, 2017
173
USA
Glad to see this thread made it over!

Finally swapped my acoustic from a dreadnought to a parlor. Best decision ever - it's so easy to pick up and play wherever.

It's an Alvarez AP610EFM. Super comfortable/playable size and neck while sounding and looking great (solid spruce top and flame mahogany sides/back).
 

dicetrain

Member
Oct 25, 2017
490
Been playing 20 years. Thinking of getting a classical and learning bossa-nova, but on the other hand, guitars are big and a mandolin for celtic is very tempting for an alternate pursuit.
 

Sankt Ra

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,810
I received my Analog Man King of Tone pedal today. Woooo. Took me only two years to get it. :/

Sadly I can’t really test it over the weekend. Still, woooo!!!

Edit: I just read that Gibson is in shambles and that there was an social media shitstorm regarding some product shots of Gibson guitars. Damn. Glad I have one that I love.
 

zdravkelja

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,019
Serbia
Any particular sort of fingerstyle?

I'm probably not going to have a book recommendation since I'm mostly self & instructor taught with respect to finger style, but I can offer some tips.
I didn't know there were different styles (except Travis), but classical fingerstyle I guess? Something like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inBKFMB-yPg

I know that it would take years to get to this level, but that's the kind of fingerstyle I'm thinking.
 

Selina

Gotham's Finest
Member
Oct 28, 2017
3,406
Started playing in 2003. Only really owned one decent electric guitar over the years and that is my Les Paul Epiphone, although I don't really like the weight to it. My amp stopped working a couple years ago and haven't replaced it yet, so I just strum on my Yamaha acoustic now and again.

Sometimes I wish I spent more time putting money this hobby rather than gaming and such.
 

CrudeDiatribe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
898
Eastern Canada
I didn't know there were different styles (except Travis), but classical fingerstyle I guess?
Lots of different was to play a guitar without a pick that all fall under the umbrella or finger style.

It’s not fundamentally different than you would see in a variety of folk music, though you would use your nails to pick a nylon sting guitar and that’s pretty brutal on a steel string.

Selina if you want to play more leave your guitar out and within reach— easy to pick up during down time during gaming.
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,382
canada
For those interested, JamTrackCentrals youtube just put out a bunch of great videos of songs on their upcoming Guitar Hero Ballads II.

Mateus Asoto (obvs) and Roy Zivs are standouts
 

EVOL

Member
Oct 27, 2017
37
Nice to see this community again.

I recently dug out my first guitar, a Squier Tele Standard and have been using it for weirder tunings.

Sounds surprisingly good, it sounds cheap in a way which is endearing. Here it is with my Mustang

 

BRKsEDU

Member
Oct 25, 2017
39
Hamilton, Ontario
I started learning the guitar this year... loving it so far. But what a difficult instrument to play! With many instruments you're able to make individual notes sound good right from the start, but with the guitar there's a LOT going on, and it is as important to control / mute strings not being played as it is to play notes properly... and I find that very difficult =P
 
Oct 27, 2017
362
Scored a 2014 American Telecaster on craigslist for 600 back in August.

The bridge pick up with heavy distortion is honey--single coils for life.
 

Selina

Gotham's Finest
Member
Oct 28, 2017
3,406
It took me a while before I really starting putting the effort into learning, but once I actually sat down and got a lot of tips from guitarist on YouTube I was soon doing things I found impossible before. Chords were something I had trouble with for a while, but now they are second nature to me. Still got a long way to go, but it's amazing how much you can improve if you just keep at it.
 

yepyepyep

Member
Oct 25, 2017
657
I bought a left handed guitar at the start of the year and have been practising by myself and using youtube and tab websites to learn songs. I am not that musically adept but I enjoy learning songs because it is fun to get an insight in how they are constructed. Still struggling to switch between open and barre chords. I am using the song Tears in the Typing Pool by Broadcast to practise because the open chord transitions between F and Bm are not very fast and it is easier to get the hang of it. I'm also just learning a couple of Angel Olsen songs at the moment. Slowly getting the hang of Acrobat.
 

ExMachina

Member
Oct 25, 2017
173
USA
For those interested, JamTrackCentrals youtube just put out a bunch of great videos of songs on their upcoming Guitar Hero Ballads II.

Mateus Asoto (obvs) and Roy Zivs are standouts
Thanks for sharing this - watched a bunch of the videos and there's some good stuff.

Mateus is one of my favorite guitarists for sure. Fans of his should check out Lari Basilio's vid as well. She's also a melodic Suhr-playing hybrid-picking master from Brazil, lol.

Scored a 2014 American Telecaster on craigslist for 600 back in August.

The bridge pick up with heavy distortion is honey--single coils for life.
Damn nice find! And hell yes re: single coils. :)
 

teruterubozu

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,369
Great to see that Guitar OT has made the migration. Here is my current collection (minus acoustics and ukuleles). Yes, my GAS (Guitar Acquisition Syndrome) is getting worse. I also have another Schecter on the way. I need help.

 

Jack Remington

User requested permanent ban
Banned
Oct 25, 2017
3,083
Glad this is up! I've been playing for like 15 years, although I'm not as good as I should be. I play a lot of Zeppelin and other classic rock type stuff. My main axe is an Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro, which in my opinion is absolutely fantastic for a guitar in the $500 range.

Next year I'm looking at getting a legit Fender Strat.

A great song for improving your finger picking is Bron Yr Aur by Zeppelin. You have to tune to CACGCE, but that's not too hard to do.
 

teruterubozu

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,369
Glad this is up! I've been playing for like 15 years, although I'm not as good as I should be. I play a lot of Zeppelin and other classic rock type stuff. My main axe is an Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro, which in my opinion is absolutely fantastic for a guitar in the $500 range.

Next year I'm looking at getting a legit Fender Strat.

A great song for improving your finger picking is Bron Yr Aur by Zeppelin. You have to tune to CACGCE, but that's not too hard to do.
The Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro is a fantastic guitar. My nephew has one, I'm trying to get him to sell it to me. lol.
Bron Yr Aur is a beautiful song. Friends by Led Zeppelin also uses CACGCE. Another fun tune to play.
 

phlpp

Member
Oct 29, 2017
83
Mainly acoustic player here (Epiphone Hummingbird, cause it‘s preeetty), started building calluses again a few days ago. Oh, the pains...
 

Kaiser Swayze

Member
Oct 30, 2017
694
I'm reaching a difficult point in my progress. I played for about 4-5 years when I was a teenager, put it down when I went off to college, and picked up the instrument again after many many years, basically relearning the instrument. I spent about a year using online resources, mostly Justinguitar.com, toyed around with Rocksmith, and then spent about the next two years taking lessons.

I've reached many of my short-term goals--I've got a good handle on chords and general play technique, I can work out most simple rock songs on my own, I can jam along to backing tracks, and I've got just enough theory knowledge to get by.

Basically, I've gotten good enough to be considered competent, but I'm unsure where to focus my energy to keep things fresh. I find myself noodling around less and less recently, and feel that plateau setting in. Although there's an abyss of knowledge out there I could yet learn, I'm almost afraid to admit that what I really need to do is start playing with other people. Being a working adult and a dad/husband, that can make getting jam sessions together a problem, and then there's finding people who want to play the same kind of music, and not to mention the general anxiety of it putting your skills out in front of others. I've put too much into this hobby to let ennui set in now. Maybe starting bass would freshen things up?
 
OP
OP
Neo0mj

Neo0mj

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,726
Oct 28, 2017
276
Eyeing a Squier Jaguar short scale bass at the moment. I'm really dissatisfied with the cheap off brand bass I picked up a couple of months ago for practice. Does anyone have any experience with SS basses?
 

treble

Member
Oct 25, 2017
569
Eyeing a Squier Jaguar short scale bass at the moment. I'm really dissatisfied with the cheap off brand bass I picked up a couple of months ago for practice. Does anyone have any experience with SS basses?
I have a Mosrite, which is 31”, and have owned a fender MIM pawn shop reverse jag bass with A 30” scale in the past. I’d recommend putting flats on a short scale, as it’s my opinion that they sound a bit better and the extra tension on some brands can help with a floppy feeling when using picks or fingers. Whatever style you choose, make sure to get appropriate length strings.

They’re great for guitarists making the move to bass or for people with smaller hands. I personally still prefer my Ricky bass, which has a 33 1/2” scale, just short of the traditional 34. I wouldn’t say the shorter scale Mosrite is missing anything in the low end though.
 
Oct 28, 2017
276
I have a Mosrite, which is 31”, and have owned a fender MIM pawn shop reverse jag bass with A 30” scale in the past. I’d recommend putting flats on a short scale, as it’s my opinion that they sound a bit better and the extra tension on some brands can help with a floppy feeling when using picks or fingers. Whatever style you choose, make sure to get appropriate length strings.

They’re great for guitarists making the move to bass or for people with smaller hands. I personally still prefer my Ricky bass, which has a 33 1/2” scale, just short of the traditional 34. I wouldn’t say the shorter scale Mosrite is missing anything in the low end though.
Cheers!

I'll still have a P Bass for jamming if I ditch that crappy bass I was talking about. I just want something relatively cheap and just fun and easy to pick up to mess around with. It's something different I'd like to try out, you know. Will definitely look into finding the right strings.
 

ZoSo006

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,795
Winnipeg
So I came home Saturday night to find my office room flooded from the suite upstairs destroyed water tank that wrecked my spider iv 75w amp, mpv 2 pedalboard and a bunch of chords.

Thankfully my ESP LTD EC 1000 was on its stand and just had water splashed on the body but from appearance, no damage to the fingerboard and up but I still haven't had time to go to a shop to plug it in to make sure the electronics aren't fucked.

Silver lining at least would be being able to replace it with a new spider v once the insurance comes through. Being able to download tones through my phone to the amp and the 60 looper are pretty appealing.
 

MilShap

Member
Oct 27, 2017
82
Portland, OR
Sorry bout that Zoso, that has happened to a few musicians I knew in the past. Always sucks, but you are right to look forward to new gear.
 

phlpp

Member
Oct 29, 2017
83
Does anyone know a good source for learning fingerpicking patterns? Been trying to up my game from all the beginner stuff I learned via youtube.
 

zbarron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
102
How did it take me this long to find the thread? I thought I'd have to make it myself once I am able to make threads.

For those who fled before seeing my restoration I finished making my $90 beat up Seagull playable.

Before:



After:



It now has a bone nut, saddle and bridge pins, instead of the dingy tusq it came with. I also cleaned the hell out of it, tightened the tuners and polished the guitar with some Scratch-X to give it a semi gloss finish. Since this picture I changed the 80/20 .10 strings for the Godin brand Phosphor Bronze .12s and while that's 3 factors I have to say the sound is noticeably better. The playability also didn't suffer nearly as much as I thought it would after giving it a setup and a low action.

This thing is shockingly loud now. I know Seagull uses really good cedar for it's tops but I think the extensive playing it's had over the past 5 years really opened up the wood's sound as well as give it tons of scratches and dings. I may have to go back down to .10s in hopes I won't bother the neighbors. From teruterubozu's suggestion I added a lot more fretboard conditioner to the fretboard and the bridge. The wood was parched.
 

Usul

Banned
Oct 31, 2017
154
Dune
Despite being an 8 string guitar the Agile Intrepid Pro 825 is the best naturally sounding and most beautiful feeling electric guitar you can have among your axes - if you don't include Music Mans! When I used to work in music retail I would just sit and play the ones in the store all day.
 

phlpp

Member
Oct 29, 2017
83
Thanks. Tried GFTNC a while ago, seemed a little too hard back then. But it‘s Dylan, so I pretty much have to master it.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,343
Anyone have recommendations for a decent affordable bass? Ideally something <$300 and with pickups that won’t sound completely unusable in a recording.
 

MilShap

Member
Oct 27, 2017
82
Portland, OR
Anyone have recommendations for a decent affordable bass? Ideally something <$300 and with pickups that won’t sound completely unusable in a recording.

Have you checked Reverb.com? I have had a few good experiences buying used gear from sellers there. Actually bought a great used bass from there not long ago that arrived in great shape.

They sometime have factory rejects that are 100% functional and playable but may have some bad paint or scuffs. Good way to get a quality instrument for cheaper.

I have been really happy with my Brubaker bass, which is a brand I hadn't heard of before. Ibanez makes a solid bass too, but a lot of it will depend on the type of sound/genre you want to play.

As an example, I am tempted to buy this myself: https://reverb.com/item/7037045-mtd-kingston-5-2016-sunburst

A bassist I worked with for years used an MTD and his sounded killer.
 
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MilShap

Member
Oct 27, 2017
82
Portland, OR
For anyone who uses any software plugins Waves Audio started their Black Friday sale. also found a code (doesn't benefit me) for an additional 10% off. CK901

The Eddie Kramer series and the GTR series are great for guitar.
 

ZoSo006

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,795
Winnipeg
Hey as I posted earlier, I looking to get a new modeling amp to replace my destroyed spider iv and while I was thinking of getting a spider v 60w, I've heard really good shit about a Blackstar ID 30TVP.

Has anyone had any experience with either amp?

I'm basically looking for an amp for alot of heavy metal/hard rock & blues playing at home with a lot on onboard effects and tones so I don't have to buy a bunch of pedals I can't afford and would be in the $500 cad or less range.
 

BLLYjoe25

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
2,969
any recommendations on an amp?

i used to play guitar a lot in my teens but since then my guitars have just been sitting in the cupboard. i want to get back into it but my Marshall MG30DFX has crapped it. my guitars are a Squier Stratocaster (Tom Delonge Signature) with a "Seymour Duncan Invader" humbucker and a Gibson Les Paul Junior. I play mostly punk/rock/metal stuff. the Marshall was too powerful in my bedroom so had it at ~1/4 volume so I'm not looking for anything crazy. Just something for in my bedroom.

are marshall still a good choice? i remember using some Fender + Vox amps which were cool but not sure what's the best to go for now.
 

Torro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
115
Germany
For bedroom practice I'd always recommend the Yamaha THR10. Its concept makes it sound much better at low volume levels than any other modelling amp I have owned so far. The last Marshall modelling amp I owned was the Code 50, and it was virtually impossible to set it to low volume levels. The Yamaha also just sounds much better.

I've also heard a lot of good things about the Boss Katana amps.
 

ZoSo006

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,795
Winnipeg
For bedroom practice I'd always recommend the Yamaha THR10. Its concept makes it sound much better at low volume levels than any other modelling amp I have owned so far. The last Marshall modelling amp I owned was the Code 50, and it was virtually impossible to set it to low volume levels. The Yamaha also just sounds much better.

I've also heard a lot of good things about the Boss Katana amps.
That Boss Katana 50 amp looks pretty decent and is fairly cheap and the THR10 has really good buzz about it as well. It's basically between those and the Blackstar one then currently.

I have to bring my guitar to the store to make sure it still works, so I'll test it out with each of those three then and see what sounds best.

Thanks
 

machinaea

Game Producer
Verified
Oct 29, 2017
169
I've also heard a lot of good things about the Boss Katana amps.
As a really versatile amp for bedroom/apartment practice, I can definitely recommend the Katana. I personally got the 50W, which is more than enough, but if you care about ease of customization, I recommend going for the 100W which has 4 channels supporting footswitch and some of the dials (like presence) can only be tuned via PC on the 50W. That said, with a long USB Type-B cable plugged into a PC (if your amp sits far away), the software is really fast and easy to use, and I these days even use a tuner on PC rather than pedalboard. It's really hard to fault the amp, and outside of tube amps (which have their downsides), that would definitely be my go to pick for any amp. That said, I only could compare it against a similar Marshall, which to me didn't seem as versatible and didn't come up as well received on the internets.