Had no idea 'Sapiens' was pronounced differently between US and UK English. What are some of your pronunciation surprises?

game-biz

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,199
When I first heard someone pronounce herb with an H....my mind was blown. But I can’t say it. I won’t do it.
 

CampFreddie

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,025
US english is slowly taking over due to it's prevalence on the internet.
I find myself saying bay-ta instead of bee-ta sometimes, since I mostly hear it said by Americans.

I've heard homo sap-ee-ans and homo say-pee-ans. Both sound okay to me.

Route is the word I never expected.
Americans say rout, with an "out" like the word out. Unless it's a road name, so Route 66 is "root 66" - because that makes total sense.
British say root.

And then there's "rout" (like if you run away in a battle), which we pronounce like the American for route. I assume Americans say this the same way.
 

cwmartin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,003
adding an s to the shortened word mathematics (which is already plural, there is no singular) always cracks me up.
 

Persephone

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Oct 25, 2017
1,381
characters pronouncing coupe as coop is like nails down a chalkboard when im watching american shows

also what the fuck is a booey supposed to be? fuck out of here
 

Scramblethink

Avenger
Nov 3, 2017
934
Herbs is the crazy one for me, why do you lot not say the h?
I drop H at the beginning of most words and T in the middle becomes a glottal stop. Same can be said for OW. Occasionally I can't be arsed pronouncing R's and they end up as some other letter, H at the end of words. 'And' just became 'n' more often n not. As a kid, it was normal around my ends to replace TH with F and in places D or V. No G at the end of words unless hard.

Fanks for dat fell'uh norvernehs. Yuv med me accent sound reyt fuckin' pre'y n I ardly understan' mesel' these dez. Cunt be ahsed avin' t listen t me ankerin on bout owt to be hones wi ya. Like am chewin a stick'a bu'eh.
 

Released

Member
Oct 27, 2017
166
One that really blew my mind was when I realized that Brits pronounce Mary, marry, and merry differently, something most of us Americans don’t do (all use the same vowel sound in “air”).
 

Anoregon

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,625
One that really blew my mind was when I realized that Brits pronounce Mary, marry, and merry differently, something most of us Americans don’t do (all use the same vowel sound in “air”).
This is definitely a regional thing in the US. I'm from NY and they are definitely pronounced differently.
 

Unaha-Closp

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,639
Scotland
The only thing that rustles my jimmies is how the US took the u out of Colour. It strips the colour from the word itself. Renders it a colourless word of nothing. That u is the texture of the word. It fits the meaning of the word perfectly. I also twitch abit when they say Math without the S but that U is the main one.
 

Rag

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,058
I listen to this Canadian podcast called Stop Podcasting Yourself, and one pronunciation that has come up a few times recently that was weird to me is the way they pronounce 'decal'. I pronounce it dee-kal, rhymes with pee pal. They pronounced it like deckle, rhymes with heckle. I don't know why it bothered me so much, but it just sounds weird.
 

canseesea

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,545
One that really blew my mind was when I realized that Brits pronounce Mary, marry, and merry differently, something most of us Americans don’t do (all use the same vowel sound in “air”).
I'm from the US and didn't realize I was from one of the few parts that differentiates these words (or at least merry from the others)

Related, the Pen/Pin merger drove me crazy when I was first introduced to it out of high school.
 

AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,356
The only thing that rustles my jimmies is how the US took the u out of Colour. It strips the colour from the word itself. Renders it a colourless word of nothing. That u is the texture of the word. It fits the meaning of the word perfectly. I also twitch abit when they say Math without the S but that U is the main one.
We’re just going back to the original. ;)

Check the Latin word for ‘color’.
 

cbrotherson

Freelance Games & Comic Book Writer
Verified
Oct 26, 2017
243
London
Always amusing:

Lieutenant –

UK: Left-en-ant

US: Loo-ten-ent


Ironic:

Era -

UK: Eee-ra

US: Eh-ra

(You should have heard us in the office trying to pronounce Resetera when it first arrived. All over the shop.)

Mildly interesting:

In the UK, we pronounced Iraq “E-rak” – until 9/11 where we had US TV networks and correspondents on our screens at a daily rate (which was rare back then). At which point, you slowly saw UK newscasters and journalists start using “I-rak” instead.
 

Cymbal Head

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,566
UK: Sap-iens like tree sap.
US: Sape-iens like vape.

Homo vapiens.

What are some pronunciation surprises you've come across Era?
They do something similar with the word "pasta." A lot of Brits pronounce it like the word "past" with an "uh" on the end. I don't think I'll ever get used to hearing it that way.
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
607
I've heard that pretty much everyone in the U.K. mispronounces Nike. It should rhyme with spiky.
 
Jul 19, 2018
537
There's plenty of differentiation within the UK, let alone vs the US. There was a debate on another forum I'm on where those from Northern England genuinely struggled to believe that for Southerners, 'but' and 'put' don't rhyme.
 

LL_Decitrig

User-Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
10,334
Sunderland
I would pronounce sapiens differently if I were reading a Latin passage or phrase, but in common English speech I wouldn't make a point about "correct" pronunciation and might pronounce it either way. Similarly I'd make an effort to pronounce homo "correctly" in Latin, because it does make a difference to the meaning.
 

zuf

Member
Oct 25, 2017
459
From the UK and quite partial to use the US pronunciations of route (rowt) and mobile (mo-bull)
 

OG Kush

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,365
I've heard that pretty much everyone in the U.K. mispronounces Nike. It should rhyme with spiky.
Does one say the name Mike as Mikey?
Or Hike as Hikey?
Like as Likey?
etc etc. You get the point. It makes logical sense for them to not have an 'ee' sound at the end of Nike, if one was just reading the word and going from there. However, Nike is a US company so the way they pronounce it is correct.

Also, I live in the UK and have never heard sap-iens too.
 

Green

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Oct 27, 2017
857
Every time you ask someone to pronounce drawer you get a different response. Words are weird.
 

Qasiel

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,188
A couple of name pronunciations I've always found amusing are Craig and Graham.

Craig:
UK - "Craygg"
US - "Cregg"

Graham
UK - "Gray-um"
US - "Gram"

For the longest time I thought "Gram crackers" were a thing in the US.
 

Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
5,953
Never heard anyone pronounce it like sap.

But on topic, I always get confused when an American pronounces Aluminum rather than Aluminium.

Or when Americans say "I could care less." Which implies they they do care somewhat. It should be "I couldn't care less."