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Had no idea 'Sapiens' was pronounced differently between US and UK English. What are some of your pronunciation surprises?

Oct 28, 2017
773
UK
I think what Johnny Foreigner needs to realise is that us Britishers don't all sound like we have stepped off the set of a Richard Fucking Curtis film.
I've never heard Rover pronounced the way one of the posters above described.
Regional dialects are very much a thing in the UK, even within the space of a few miles.
 
Dec 23, 2017
922
Atlanta, GA
Off topic, but does anyone else have the ability to distinguish a lot of british and american people based on the positioning of their mouth? "Resting brit face", lol. But its not really when its resting, it seems that british people often use their lower jaw more when speaking or something. I was watching Shawn of the Dead the other day and noticed that Shawn's girlfriend was basically talking with her neck muscles.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
3,002
I watch a lot of QI so I'm constantly hearing the differences in the way the English pronounce things compared to Americans.

Glacier is one I always remember.

Americans: Glay-sher

English: Glass-ear
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,804
Chesire, UK
The two that I'm amused by is the British pluralization of 'math'
i will be deep in the cold cold ground before I say maths instead of math.
Do you guys study Statistic, Genetic and Physic too?

No, you study Statistics, Genetics, Physics and Mathematics.

Maths is the correct abbreviation, much as Stats is the correct abbreviation.


You should be familiar with Stats from your beloved Baseball.
 
May 10, 2018
430
this thread bothers me. it's like a bunch of people, likely mostly from one country, discovering that other accents exist and making fun of them, without realising that they themselves speak in an accent that sounds foreign and funny to a lot of people. it feels ignorant or swaggering. also, there are way more native english accents than just the us/uk/aus. you should all listen to people from bermuda or liberia and realise the diversity inherent to the language

okay sorry I'll take the stick out my ass
 
Oct 29, 2017
1,506
Seattle
May 31, 2018
4,692
I think what Johnny Foreigner needs to realise is that us Britishers don't all sound like we have stepped off the set of a Richard Fucking Curtis film.
I've never heard Rover pronounced the way one of the posters above described.
Regional dialects are very much a thing in the UK, even within the space of a few miles.
You'd think with the popularity of films like Hot Fuzz and shows like Game of Thrones over there that we'd get some more recognition of this sort of thing and less "every Brit sounds like David Attenborough." Do they think those accents were just put on for show or something?
 
Oct 25, 2017
382
Blue Mountains
Australia pronounces it like the US, Vite-a-mins. Triggers me every time as a Brit living in Australia.

Because it's also correctly called & spelled aluminum, and not just by americans.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium#Etymology

I like to make sure the privacy of my private information is prioritized for maximum privacy.
Put aluminum into the wiki search and it redirects to aluminium, both may be right, but aluminum is slightly less right than aluminium.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
1,060
Ma'am ("marrrm") sounds different to mum, but close-ish to some American accent's "mom".

It's also a word that only ever gets used in institutions like the police. I have literally never said it.
Yeah it was in that bodyguard show I first noticed it.

What is the term you guys use for the same thing for saying thank you to a women typically when your younger?
 
(Some?) Americans not pronouncing the h in conch. Maybe a dialect thing?
I'm so confused by this haha. I'm American and have never heard it without the "h". Are people pronouncing it like "Conk"?
What the fuck? And Google is promoting "conk" as the primary pronunciation. I don't care about most differences in pronunciation, but this is fucking unacceptable.
 
Do you guys study Statistic, Genetic and Physic too?

No, you study Statistics, Genetics, Physics and Mathematics.

Maths is the correct abbreviation, much as Stats is the correct abbreviation.


You should be familiar with Stats from your beloved Baseball.
If I had to guess, the usage of math in America without an s may be due to the fact that school was usually about “reading, writing and arithmetic.” (The 3 Rs)

Your example here those is a little off because you can’t easily shorten physics or genetics. They’re always used with an s. Stats is used as a way to shorten the subject because stat is a word in and of itself outside learning whereas math has only one use.
 
What the fuck? And Google is promoting "conk" as the primary pronunciation. I don't care about most differences in pronunciation, but this is fucking unacceptable.
As someone from Florida where conch shells and the Conch Republic are a thing...it’s conk. I didn’t realize people regularly said it how it’s spelled elsewhere. I figured the accurate pronunciation would have spread.
 
Mar 13, 2019
124
What is the term you guys use for the same thing for saying thank you to a women typically when your younger?
I actually don't think I used one. When I was younger, I'd either call adult women Mrs. Surname if they were in a position of authority, or by their first name if they were parents of really close friends.

Technically, I guess the answer is probably madam or ma'am, but I don't think they get used like they do in, say, France, where kids routinely call adults monsieur and madame. I've only ever said madam or sir in a really professional letter.

By the same token, I don't think anyone really calls little girls miss or missy in the UK, whereas mademoiselle gets used a lot in France.

I know you guys in the US use missy to refer to clothing sizes for young girls.