• Introducing Image Options for ResetEra 2.0! Check the left side navigation bar to show or hide images, avatars, covers, and embedded media. More details at the link.

Had no idea 'Sapiens' was pronounced differently between US and UK English. What are some of your pronunciation surprises?

Oct 25, 2017
1,060
I actually don't think I used one. When I was younger, I'd either call adult women Mrs. Surname if they were in a position of authority, or by their first name if they were parents of really close friends.

Technically, I guess the answer is probably madam or ma'am, but I don't think they get used like they do in, say, France, where kids routinely call adults monsieur and madame. I've only ever said madam or sir in a really professional letter.

By the same token, I don't think anyone really calls little girls miss or missy in the UK, whereas mademoiselle gets used a lot in France.

I know you guys in the US use missy to refer to clothing sizes for young girls.
Fascinating. I find formalisms and honorifics one of the most under talked about but fascinating parts of linguistics because of how I think it subconsciously affects our view of social structure
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,774
(Re: "Conk" for conch:)



I first noticed it on a lengthy crosscountry train journey which would have been in 1996 or so, so it predates Spongebob.
How do they pronounce it in the film adaptation of Lord Of The Flies? Only ever read the book, but if the film got it wrong, that could account for the -ch pronunciation seeping into popular use.
 
OP
OP
Kyuuji
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
Sconn is actually correct isn’t it? I thought scone was the chav way of pronouncing it.
Uhh, huh.. that's odd. Scone rhyming with "own" is typically mocked as a 'Queen's English' way of saying the word in my experience. With it rhyming with "on" typically seen as the 'common' way of saying it.

Never once seen that flipped to be the reverse.
 
Mar 13, 2019
124
Uhh, huh.. that's odd. Scone rhyming with "own" is typically mocked as a 'Queen's English' way of saying the word in my experience. With it rhyming with "on" typically seen as the 'common' way of saying it.

Never once seen that flipped to be the reverse.
I say it to rhyme with "own" and I get mocked for being posh. Either is valid, though: see phone or sconce. English pronunciation is messed up.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,065
Uhh, huh.. that's odd. Scone rhyming with "own" is typically mocked as a 'Queen's English' way of saying the word in my experience. With it rhyming with "on" typically seen as the 'common' way of saying it.

Never once seen that flipped to be the reverse.
I’d always thought it was the way people ‘wot wanted 2 sound propr posh’ said it, and it was sort of ironic as a result.
 
OP
OP
Kyuuji
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
I say it to rhyme with "own" and I get mocked for being posh. Either is valid, though: see phone or sconce. English pronunciation is messed up.
I wasn't suggesting either was particularly correct, just more amazed that the "own" variation was seen as chavvy when my experience it's the opposite.

I’d always thought it was the way people ‘wot wanted 2 sound propr posh’ said it, and it was sort of ironic as a result.
That makes sense in a roundabout way. Originally seen as posh, picked up by people that want to appear posh but aren't and thus becomes associated with their use of it.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,065
I wasn't suggesting either was particularly correct, just more amazed that the "own" variation was seen as chavvy when my experience it's the opposite.


That makes sense in a roundabout way. Originally seen as posh, picked up by people that want to appear posh but aren't and thus becomes associated with their use of it.
Nah the posh way was always the correct way to pronounce it, and then ‘scone’ was just used by people wanting to sound posh, but weren’t.
 
OP
OP
Kyuuji
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
Nah the posh way was always the correct way to pronounce it, and then ‘scone’ was just used by people wanting to sound posh, but weren’t.
Off topic but the real question is what type of scone are we talking about and what with it?

Love the standard with jam and cream. Cheese is always amazing with a healthy (not so healthy) slab of butter. The farm shop down from my parents does Bacon and Stilton scones though and I'm sure I'd be bankrupt by now if they were any closer to me. Amazing things.

Now I'm hungry.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,065
Off topic but the real question is what type of scone are we talking about and what with it?

Love the standard with jam and cream. Cheese is always amazing with a healthy (not so healthy) slab of butter. The farm shop down from my parents does Bacon and Stilton scones though and I'm sure I'd be bankrupt by now if they were any closer to me.
Ooh shall we talk cream first or jam first? Me and my girlfriend are for opposite sides of the Cornwall Devon divide (sorta) so we disagree
 
OP
OP
Kyuuji
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
Ooh shall we talk cream first or jam first? Me and my girlfriend are for opposite sides of the Cornwall Devon divide (sorta) so we disagree
I feel like a scrub now because I didn't know this was a thing. I usually go cream first only because I find it's easier to apply jam to cream than vice versa. I fucking love clotted cream.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,065
I feel like a scrub now because I didn't know this was a thing. I usually go cream first only because I find it's easier to apply jam to cream than vice versa. I fucking love clotted cream.
Devon is jam first (like cream on a pudding) Cornwall is cream first (as if it’s butter). I’m the latter.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,486
Ummm we do not pronounce sapiens like that in the UK.

As for biggest surprise? That fact that 90% of Americans still can't understand that it's 'couldn't care less' Not 'could care less'.
 
OP
OP
Kyuuji
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
All 3 English recordings (2 from the UK - 1 from the US) say it sape- here https://forvo.com/word/homo_sapiens/#en
This entire thread is people thinking Brits pronounce words in ways they absolutely do not.
It's the British English form even though it's not as commonly used anymore:
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/homo-sapiens
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/homo-sapiens
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/pronunciation/english/homo-sapiens

Though it is used in talks like the below:



This all started from someone correcting me for using 'sape' and me looking it up thinking they were mad only to find that it is in fact the BE distinction. Which kind of blew me away as it sounded ridiculous on initial hearing.