has anyone read the peripheral by William Gibson?

xir

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,511
Los Angeles, CA
so i picked it up when it came out and bounced hard after the first few chapters, really fuzzy not sure what was going on, etc.
i love gibson, and saw him at a book signing for the sequel a few weeks ago, so decided to try it again, and man you could almost skip the first 100 pages and take it as a in media res when they are explaining the catalyst event. I'm kinda hooked now, but that sure took awhile.
 
Oct 27, 2017
63
I'm a big fan of it and have been reading the sequel, Agency that just came out.

I think its one of my favorites of his since Neuromancer.
 

neon_dream

Member
Dec 18, 2017
3,588
QUOTE="Grug, post: 29126343, member: 9625"]His concepts are great but he is just not a good writer.[/QUOTE]

Honestly I haven't seen that opinion before.

Neuromancer has numerous literary accolades. Personally I really enjoyed reading that trilogy and Burning Chrome, the short story collection that preceded the Neuromancer trilogy. It's far better than most scifi I've read, including Asimov or Snow Crash.
 

Pixieking

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,903
Honestly I haven't seen that opinion before.

Neuromancer has numerous literary accolades. Personally I really enjoyed reading that trilogy and Burning Chrome, the short story collection that preceded the Neuromancer trilogy. It's far better than most scifi I've read, including Asimov or Snow Crash.
I mean, I love Neuromancer, but whilst it's evocative writing, the characters aren't written all that well. Molly is just, like... there. And saying the trilogy is better than Asimov, who was old-fashioned in terms of gender when Neuromancer came out, and Snow Crash which has some dodgy scenes with women...

That said, I do think the Bridge Trilogy is some fascinating writing, if a little dense at times.
 

neon_dream

Member
Dec 18, 2017
3,588
I mean, I love Neuromancer, but whilst it's evocative writing, the characters aren't written all that well. Molly is just, like... there. And saying the trilogy is better than Asimov, who was old-fashioned in terms of gender when Neuromancer came out, and Snow Crash which has some dodgy scenes with women...

That said, I do think the Bridge Trilogy is some fascinating writing, if a little dense at times.
Both characters are damaged, physically and psychologically, by technology. The distance and coldness between them exemplifies that. But it's their relationship that humanizes both, incompletely but still so. Ultimately though, the characters are still subject to the dehumanizing nature of the world they live in and so their relationship never progresses much.

Beyond that, the book is fairly strictly limited to the main character's experience. So you don't learn much about other characters beyond his thoughts (which are, again, those of someone horribly psychologically scarred).

That's sort of the point: both the wonders and perils of a world driven by computer technology and the effects that world has on people.

It's been a long while since I read Neuromancer, but that's sort of the gist of those two character's relationship, from what I recall. It's convenient and good for both of them, but ultimately they're both very damaged and unequipped, emotionally or psychologically, to carry on a deeper relationship than that. Which is something the book does talk about, IIRC
 

FlexMentallo

The Fallen
Oct 29, 2017
244
Los Angeles
Reading it right now, about half way through, really digging it. I bounced once and restarted, actually had that experience with a few of Gibson’s novels over the years. They just tend to be dense with terminology and ideas up front, jump around characters and take a while to weave things together. That’s basically his style as far as I can tell.