Hunter x Hunter |OT| Calling x All x Hunters

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
I have a random question... Does the HxH anime ever use the word "energy"?

Me and my friend somehow got on the subject on the usage of the word "power" and "energy" for these kind of shows. He said energy sounds weird and is never used, it's always "power", and "energy" only used for DBZ. I'm like wat, I'm pretty sure I hear both used pretty much in any of these shows, they are interchangable in many instances. And becuase of this dumb argument I'm looking out for it now. I've noticed yu yu hakusho uses energy. What about HxH?
 

OmegaX

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,800
I have a random question... Does the HxH anime ever use the word "energy"?

Me and my friend somehow got on the subject on the usage of the word "power" and "energy" for these kind of shows. He said energy sounds weird and is never used, it's always "power", and "energy" only used for DBZ. I'm like wat, I'm pretty sure I hear both used pretty much in any of these shows, they are interchangable in many instances. And becuase of this dumb argument I'm looking out for it now. I've noticed yu yu hakusho uses energy. What about HxH?
They use "Nen" which is a made up term exclusive to the HxH world.
YYH uses Reiki and Youki which the dub translates to spirit energy and demon energy.
 

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
Well that reminds me of partially how we got to the topic. We were talking about how "power"/"energy" are often used as generic terms alongside what the actual name of the magic system is. Like just because the magic in DBZ is called "ki" doesn't mean you wont hear them use "energy" every now and then. Or just because the magic in Naruto is called "chakra" doesn't mean you won't hear them use "power" sometimes.
 

Moara

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,192
Yeah, I can't really think of them ever using "energy" in that way in HxH. When referring to someone's Nen, it's usually something like "that was the worst Aura I've ever encountered".
 

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
Examples of what I'm looking for in the usage of the words would be a line of dialogue like

"I can feel his aura", except replacing the word aura with the more "generic" terms "energy/power". (I feel like they're often used in these shows as interchangables simply to avoid too much repetition, but that's besides the point)

Another example

"he's building a lot of aura", except replacing aura with the other words.
 

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
Though, again, used very generically.

Damn, this one put me on a rollercoaster... It got me thinking...

Like is he talking about "nen" energy? Or is he just talking about like, "normal" energy like how we call it irl? Uvo is mentioning here that he still has the energy to strike back after the punch, but it's not like his punch absorbs nen. Getting phsyically hurt doesn't mean your nen is getting drained, does it? Idk.

If I knew he was referring directly to "nen energy" then this would be exactly what I want.
 

AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,093
Damn, this one put me on a rollercoaster... It got me thinking...

Like is he talking about "nen" energy? Or is he just talking about like, "normal" energy like how we call it irl? Uvo is mentioning here that he still has the energy to strike back after the punch, but it's not like his punch absorbs nen. Getting phsyically hurt doesn't mean your nen is getting drained, does it? Idk.

If I knew he was referring directly to "nen energy" then this would be exactly what I want.
Here's three-in-one.

 

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
Here's three-in-one.

Ok I'm gonna put this one in my evidence pile anyway, and I know this sounds frustratingly picky, but something about this being a technical breakdown of the relationship between "aura" and "nen", and not being as broad of a usage of the term, makes me feel this case can be argued against somehow.

I looked up the actual technical difference between power and energy, and energy is basically dormant/capacity, and power is the rate of producing or consuming energy.

So technically Uvo should be saying power here? 🤔 Or wait.... Idk... This is deep. (Not that the convo was about all of that, just about how it's used these stories)
 
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AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,093
Ok I'm gonna put this one in my evidence pile anyway, and I know this sounds frustratingly picky, but something about this being a technical breakdown of the relationship between "aura" and "nen", and not being as broad of a usage of the term, makes me feel this case can be argued against somehow.

I looked up the actual technical difference between power and energy, and energy is basically dormant/capacity, and power is the rate of producing or consuming energy.

So technically Uvo should be saying power here? 🤔 Or wait.... Idk... This is deep. (Not that the convo was about all of that, just about how it's used these stories)
Some energy from Heavens Arena.

 

AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,093
Full interview with Togashi, conducted in November 2017 (let me know if you spot any typos).

--

I feel like today’s Shonen Jump is where I belong more than ever.

Yoshihiro Togashi creates his manga strategically, always thinking about how he is perceived as a manga artist. With his massively successful manga Yu Yu Hakusho, he decided from the very beginning that it would transition from a good story to a battle manga, turning the series into a major driving force in the popularity of 1990s Shonen Jump. With his next series called Level E, Togashi offered a story-centered sci-fi manga to show a different side of himself to readers, obliterating the image once associated with him through Yu Yu Hakusho.

Then Hunter x Hunter was born in 1998, which is still in serialization today.

“This isn’t a very charming way to put it, but since I was creating manga for Shonen Jump, I mainly focused on making my next one a ‘hit.’ Since the latter half of Yu Yu Hakusho, I started paying really close attention to reader polls. Instead of just focusing on my own ranking, I would look at them all, zeroing in on which artist and story were number one. Analyzing those polls made me realize that, in order to get votes, I’d have to do a sports manga or a battle manga, which have clear winners and losers. So I decided a battle manga would be good for my next one.”

When asked why he didn’t choose sports, he laughed and said he thought it would be “a pain in the butt.”

“For a sports manga, the setting has to be modern. That can be a real hassle (laughs). You have to be careful not to make the characters wear outdated clothes, and other things like that start to add up. But for a battle manga that doesn’t take place in modern times, you can just say, ‘Hey, these clothes are fashionable in this world!’ (laughs).”

Togashi started Hunter x Hunter in this way, a die-hard battle manga combined with a deep story, that clearly reflected his own personality. The main character Gon is unique, because he may look cute at a glance, but he won’t waver in a fight, and even leaves readers with a sense of fear.

“At first I wanted to make Gon into a ‘good boy’ sort of character, who would rank in high as someone you’d want as your own son. But, I guess from the setting phase of the first volume to be serialized, I knew he was different. As soon as he declares he’ll abandon the one who raised him to work as a Hunter, we realize he’s not such a good boy after all. I thought, ‘Man, this guy is really edgy.’ (laughs) But since he has the blood of his father, a man who abandoned his child and became a Hunter himself, I thought it was fitting for him to declare this. I thought he was a very natural character.”

He says making the hero into an “edgy character” fit well with the direction of the story.

“If he was a level-headed character instead of an edgy one, I’d have to deal with the aspect of hesitation when it comes to fighting battles. I suppose going in that direction could be fun in its own way, but I didn’t want that trait to take the forefront in this manga. After all, I couldn’t abandon the readers who want to read a good battle manga. I’m glad I decided to make a character like Gon into the protagonist, since I didn’t have to deal with that hesitation aspect. But at the same time, I couldn’t leave out the calm, level-headed character either, so that’s the personality I gave to Leorio. When I draw characters, they tend to be tall with slightly high cheek bones. Kuwabara from Yu Yu Hakusho is like that too.”

I have my own standards to meet in order to keep drawing for Shonen Jump.

Twenty years have passed since Hunter x Hunter was first serialized. A lot of manga artists run into mental and physical hurdles trying to continue writing for Shonen Jump, but Togashi seems to be quite carefree.

“That comes from my shameless personality. Serious manga artists feel they can’t last in Shonen Jump, because those who stay with the magazine are judged on a weekly basis, and they don’t think they can create every week. I guess it’s pretty weird that someone creating at my pace can stay with Shonen Jump for so long (laughs).”

In spite of that comment, Togashi has a clear set of standards he puts himself under to continue working for Shonen Jump.

“My series is so long (Dark Continent Expedition arc), but I can’t bring myself to quit part way through. I know it probably sounds self-contradictory, but by setting that dilemma aside, I set a personal standard based on the number of comics published. If the actual number falls below my standard, I feel like the readers are telling me there’s no point in keeping it going. But if the number exceeds that standard, it shows me that the readers think it’s just as interesting as I do, so I want to keep it running.”

Now that Togashi has seen the inner workings of Shonen Jump for so long, how does he feel about it?

“This could be a trend of the times, but I feel like the readership is changing. And that ‘macho’ feel the magazine has had for so long is rapidly decreasing. So I feel like this modern Shonen Jump is unmistakably where I belong. And I think it’s easier to put interesting shojo manga (girls’ manga) elements into the stories now compared to the old days.”

He also pays close attention to manga created by young artists. In particular, Dr. Stone, Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba, and WORLD TRIGGER.

“I intentionally stay away from battle manga as a reader. And if I happen to see some material that eerily similar to Hunter x Hunter, I’ll pretend I never saw it (laughs). Today’s manga artists are really well-groomed. When it comes to fashion and nice clothes... Since the early days, I didn’t care much about anything other than creating manga. If I could get by without eating, bathing, or sleeping, then I wouldn’t do those things. That was easy when I was younger, and I always wanted to keep human contact to a minimum. But with that attitude, I couldn’t meet with people who cared about outer appearances (laughs). So when I meet with the young artists today, I try to keep myself groomed to an acceptable level, just the bare minimum to get by.”

I want to finish Hunter x Hunter the right way.

“They let me do whatever I want.”

His currently serialized work is tough, but can also be fun.

“The series I’m doing now might look like a huge hassle from other perspectives, but I have a great time doing it. When I was younger, I could hardly get the green light for things I wanted to do, but now at long last, they let me do whatever I want.”

Sometimes there are things he wants to “get payback for” that he wasn’t able to create when he was younger.

“Romantic comedies (laughs). But I’m not young enough to do those kinds of things anymore, so sometimes I think it’s better to have someone else illustrate my stories. I wrote a story last year called AKUTEN WARS (illustrated by Hachi Mizuno). I figure if letting someone else do the illustrations makes it a better product, I don’t have any qualms with it. With Level E, I actually wanted to use more realistic drawings. But I felt there were two types of readers―the ones who wouldn’t mind if someone else illustrated my stories, and the ones who want to read a manga that I’ve written and illustrated. I’m still not sure how to balance that issue to please the most people. For some genres I feel like it’s fine to leave to the illustrations to someone else.”

Perhaps many manga will soon be released by Togashi, with artists able to best illustrate his unique brand of worlds.

“I also need to think about wrapping up Hunter x Hunter once and for all. There have been a lot of times when it stops showing up on the pages of Shonen Jump, and I’m sure people are wondering what I’m doing. But just as a comedian doesn’t show up on TV for a while sometimes, he’s still working somewhere else, and I’m working every day. Sometimes I’m not sure which will expire first, the series or me (laughs). I feel like I want to end it the right way. But in a way, you can say it has ended once, at the moment Gon met Ging. I think some readers thought it ended with that scene, and I write it that way on purpose. Generally I want people to think that there’s still some room to continue on. When reading Shonen Jump, sometimes I’ve thought, ‘This series should end right at this point.’ And I’ve gotten mad when they decide to keep it going. As a reader I don’t want to lose that kind of feeling. But right now with Hunter x Hunter, I feel like I still want to see it continue on from a reader’s perspective. As as the artist, I still enjoy doing the story and illustrations. So I ask for those who choose to keep following me on this journey for their continued support.”
I don't know if I just missed this back then, but more from that interview, mostly on stuff pre-HxH:

-- --

“Being with Shonen Jump from the beginning isn’t something I can say with confidence.”

So says Yoshihiro Togashi. But the truth is that, not only did he debut with Shonen Jump (with a manga serialized in their Weekly Shonen Jump Winter Special), but he continues to write and draw for them to this day, making him a Shonen Jump manga artist through and through.

“I always liked Shonen Jump even before my debut, and boys’ comics in general, but my interests were also firmly rooted in Garo, Hana to Yume, and those types of magazines. The first manga job I ever submitted for consideration was for Weekly Young Jump (a magazine geared towards young adult males). There’s a sort of yin and yang in me. The yang side led me to Shonen Jump, but the yin side has always held some importance to me as well. So even though I’m a part of Shonen Jump, somehow I don’t feel like it defines me.”

When news of Shonen Jump’s record sales was big in the 1990s, it didn’t really hit home for him.

“I thought it was pretty amazing. But honestly, I didn’t feel like I was a part of it. It didn’t seem as if I played a role in that success, or that I could increase sales even more if I worked hard enough. I guess I wasn’t really wrapped up in all the hype because I knew the day would come when sales would fall again, and I didn’t want to get swept away by it all. I would distance myself from all the craziness and excitement. Holding that philosophy in and of itself was pretty amazing to me. I know. It’s a pretty convoluted way of thinking, isn’t it? (laughs)”

He explained that he wanted to keep his distance from other manga artists at Shonen Jump.

“I wanted to look at them as perfect in every way, and not dig any deeper. Basically, I didn’t want to discover a human side to them, by talking about anything that wasn’t manga related. Just as a child might think their idol never has to go to the bathroom, I had this fantasy about manga artists being perfect (laughs).”

Because of this, one of the things Togashi dreaded was the annual group photo with all the manga artists, to be posted on the cover of each New Year’s edition.

“I had a hard time meeting up with them, and having my picture taken like that. Back then we used to dress up in Formula 1 racing suits or similar costumes for the picture. But I thought if they ever made me wear something more revealing, I’d have to up and quit working for Shonen Jump (laughs).”

I decided to gradually develop “Yu Yu Hakusho” into a battle manga.

Togashi only has memories of failure regarding his first serialized manga, a love-themed comic called “Ten de Showaru Cupid.”

“Back then, I felt really intimidated by the other manga artists, because of how powerful they were. I remember thinking I had to steal some fan votes from one of them just to stay alive in the business, but they were all too powerful to touch, so the desire to keep it running wasn’t there.”

But after the series ended, he immediately had the desire to start writing and drawing again.

“With the love-themed comics, I felt as if I was biting off more than I could chew, because I was trying to do something beyond my abilities. So for my next one, I wanted to work on something I actually enjoy that could gain popularity. Eventually I realized it would be a battle-themed comic. After all, battles are a staple of Shonen Jump stories. So I thought I’d try my luck in that field to see what happens.”

“Yu Yu Hakusho” was supposed to be a battle manga, but there weren’t any battles early in its run. Instead there were good, heartfelt stories.

“My supervisor was uncomfortable with me doing this, since it was my first battle manga. So instead, he asked me to start out with a ‘good story,’ and eventually transition to battles from the 30th volume or so [not sure if it’s a translation error, but I imagine “chapter” is meant here]. I agreed to do this to get the green light.”

It was built up strategically from the beginning for serialization.

“‘Kinnikuman’ is a good comparison. It started out as a gag manga, but eventually they had the Chojin Olympics. The thinking behind this is to build up the characters first, so the readers gain a certain amount of familiarity with them, and once that is established, put them in tense battle situations. I was pretty impressed with this formula after seeing it work.”

Just as Togashi had planned, once he began to illustrate battles, he gained a huge amount of reader votes, and “Yu Yu Hakusho” became a massive hit. A major reason for its success was due to the amount of fan interest in Hiei and Kurama, two lesser characters that were just as popular as the hero Yusuke.

“I always had a feeling Kurama would be a fan favorite when I was drawing them, but I never thought that about Hiei. With no particular goal in mind, I thought freeing up this passion sealed inside me would lead to amazing things. I was really focused on what I thought was cool rather than what others might think (laughs).”

Togashi determined when to cancel the series himself. Of course, the Editing Department tried to get him to reconsider, but he calmly explained that some other manga will just take its place when it’s canceled.

“Obviously I put a lot of my own flavor in the manga I write, but I also make sure to add some of the traditional elements that make Shonen Jump what it is. So when I say I want to stop writing a manga, it’s a lot different than if a true genius like Akira Toriyama announces the same thing. I guess it was a little cold of me to say it like that (laughs), but that’s really what I thought back then. After that, my goal was to create a manga that was truly irreplaceable.

Once Togashi had established that goal, he announced to the Editing Department that he would create a manga that won’t get reader votes. And that manga was “Level E”.

“I told them this without any explanation, so they were pretty shocked (laughs). From the beginning, I had no desire for this to be a feature manga in the magazine.”

Level E was a lot different from “Yu Yu Hakusho,” in that it was a sci-fi manga drawn in omnibus format, meaning each volume was an independent story with different characters.

“I wanted to show the readers something I was unable to give them in my previous works, by showing them I could construct a story and tie it all together with no loose ends. In order for readers to experience something that I’d want to read myself, I’d have to break away from the mold I was publicly recognized for as a manga artist, and show them something completely different from ‘Yu Yu Hakusho’.”

Togashi continued to think strategically in terms of how he was perceived as a manga artist. And this is how his next work “Hunter × Hunter” was born, which is still in serialization today.

Just like Onji, no matter how old I look,
I’m still a child at heart, who wants to keep playing here.


Togashi has been doing Shonen Jump manga continuously for nearly 30 years, so I asked him what Shonen Jump means to him.

“It’s irreplaceable. To put it differently, I guess I’d call it my playground. Almost like a game because of the system in place. If you don’t get the reader votes, you’re done. But if you do get the votes, you can survive in this world. It’s very cut and dry. I’ve managed to perfectly balance that feeling with a sense of admiration for the company.”

He’s always felt this way about Shonen Jump, from his days as a reader to where he is now.

“Generally, I feel like I’m living someone else’s life now. Since I was born in a small town as the eldest son, you’d think I’d feel ashamed if I didn’t secure some sort of 9-to-5 career, but I’ve never felt that way. In my second year of college, I realized I’m sort of an outcast when it comes to what society expects of you, and I’ve learned to enjoy that character trait of mine (laughs). I’ve known about Shonen Jump’s system since my days as a reader, and I assumed there were a lot of social outcasts working there like myself, so I wanted to enjoy the game too. But in order to participate in the game, I knew you have to get votes.”

When he actually joined “the game,” what sort of people were there?

“Well, they were all a lot different than I assumed (laughs). Osamu Akimoto [author of Kochikame], the manga artist with the most seniority, is a remarkably decent person. And some of the offices feel like a teacher’s room to me. The Editing Department is like a messy teacher’s room (laughs). If you go in there, you’ll get scolded. So I made a point to steer clear of the Editing Department as much as possible (laughs). Just like Onji (from “Yu Yu Hakusho”), no matter how old I look, I’m still a child at heart, who wants to keep playing here. That’s what Shonen Jump is to me. And I strive to keep creating manga that readers love, so they hope I’ll stick around.”

-- --

And here's that Formula 1 cover he mentioned lol.

 

Mariip

Member
Oct 26, 2017
10,513
Everyone and their mother at my job is begging me to read level E, i think i’ll read that after i finish the first volume of hokuto no ken lol
 

AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,093
Everyone and their mother at my job is begging me to read level E, i think i’ll read that after i finish the first volume of hokuto no ken lol
It's a decent little series. However unlikely, I'm hoping it gets an official release someday.

And you quickly learn what he meant by a series that wouldn't get reader votes lol. Very much Togashi just enjoying himself.
 

Mariip

Member
Oct 26, 2017
10,513
It's a decent little series. However unlikely, I'm hoping it gets an official release someday.

And you quickly learn what he meant by a series that wouldn't get reader votes lol. Very much Togashi just enjoying himself.
What kind of a job has everyone demanding you read an obscure manga?
It was released digitally and in print here in brazil, and i work at the publisher sooooo
 

icyflamez96

Member
Oct 26, 2017
5,822
I wish I was compiling all the comparisons from YYH to HxH I came across, because I had more. But here are some

The whole chapter black thing and the human atrocities, and the themes about humans maybe being lowkey worse than demons reminds me of all that studd in the Chimera Ant arc about what Humans are capable of, and how they're just as bad as the ants and all that jazz.

Togashi REALLY likes that Knuckle hairstyle. Also the Sensui guy kinda looks similar to the dark skinned tall dude that dies in the Yorknew arc.

Kishi probably got his shadow possesion jutsu from that shadow guy in YYH.

Lastly, togashi is a gamer
 

AoM

Member
Oct 31, 2017
3,093
I wish I was compiling all the comparisons from YYH to HxH I came across, because I had more. But here are some

The whole chapter black thing and the human atrocities, and the themes about humans maybe being lowkey worse than demons reminds me of all that studd in the Chimera Ant arc about what Humans are capable of, and how they're just as bad as the ants and all that jazz.

Togashi REALLY likes that Knuckle hairstyle. Also the Sensui guy kinda looks similar to the dark skinned tall dude that dies in the Yorknew arc.

Kishi probably got his shadow possesion jutsu from that shadow guy in YYH.

Lastly, togashi is a gamer
So you finished Chapter Black?