I want to learn German

esseesse

Member
Oct 27, 2017
425
The title says it all.
I feel that German is essential in order to progress my career and change onto the automotive industry. The thing is...it is hard AF. Quite fun though. Any suggestions to help me with it?

Thinking about joining a German institute and learn it in an intensive course. I tried Duolingo and had some classes in college but they were so far apart that I retained very little.
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,706
I mean if you already speak English, German is one of the easiest languages to learn. Not really sure how to help you further.
 

signal

Member
Oct 28, 2017
17,253
 

johan

Member
Oct 29, 2017
782
I'd say the best way to learn a language is signing up for a course. That's how I'm currently learning Japanese and it's so much fun.

Also I wouldn't say German is that hard BUT I am Dutch. Articles in German suck ass tho.

Viel Glück und viel Spaß esseesse!
 
OP
OP
esseesse

esseesse

Member
Oct 27, 2017
425
Also, I am Portuguese. I know near native English both from a speaking writing and speaking perspective though.
It ain't easy however...
 

Westbahnhof

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
4,891
Austria
Hmmmm. I think your grasp of Portuguese and English should be a good basis to learn German. My experience (with other languages) with duolingo is great, so keep at it.
Maybe get a German pen pal, once you're good enough? One who is willing to help you improve and correct you.

Also, learn to say "Oachkatzlschwoaf, oida", to earn some Austrian appreciation.
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,706
Also, I am Portuguese. I know near native English both from a speaking writing and speaking perspective though.
It ain't easy however...
I mean it should be even easier if you're already familiar with the concept of gendered nouns and actual cases. Just need to learn a bunch of words and then figure out the pronunciation.
 

MoogleWizard

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,012
I mean if you already speak English, German is one of the easiest languages to learn. Not really sure how to help you further.
Uh, that's not really true. German grammar and syntax is quite different from English. English has basically lost grammatical case, conjugation, declension and grammatical gender. It's hard to imagine how difficult it can be to come from a language that doesn't have those systems or has lost them, like English, and then learn a language that has them, like German. English is rather easy to learn if your mother tongue is German, but the other way around is not as easy.

Edit: OK, OP's mother tongue is Portuguese, it should be easier in that case.
 

Kordelle

Member
Oct 27, 2017
436
Deutsche Sprache schwere Sprache.

Good luck, some stuff like articles must be really confusing for non-native speakers.
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,706
Uh, that's not really true. German grammar and syntax is quite different from English. English has basically lost grammatical case, conjugation, declension and grammatical gender. It's hard to imagine how difficult it can be to come from a language that doesn't have those systems or has lost them, like English, and then learn a language that has them, like German. English is rather easy to learn if your mother tongue is German, but the other way around is not as easy.

Edit: OK, OP's mother tongue is Portuguese, it should be easier in that case.
Even if it's not easy based on English, it's not like there's many other easier ones.
 

wbloop

Member
Oct 26, 2017
925
Magdeburg, Germany
The title says it all.
I feel that German is essential in order to progress my career and change onto the automotive industry. The thing is...it is hard AF. Quite fun though. Any suggestions to help me with it?

Thinking about joining a German institute and learn it in an intensive course. I tried Duolingo and had some classes in college but they were so far apart that I retained very little.
Considering the problems our automobile firms have right now because of the diesel scandals I wouldn't know if they even hire prople right now. /s

Anyway, good luck! The most difficult things should be the articles and the usage of different times, I guess. Konjunktiv II is still a Hurensohn, lol
 

Laser Man

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,012
If you get confused with "Der/Die/Das" just use "Dem" for everything, problem solved.

"The car belongs to the the dude at the corner, the mofo with the green hat!"

"Dem Auto gehört dem typen an der Ecke ey, mit dem grünen Hut yo!"

It's that easy!
 

mxbison

Member
Jan 14, 2019
1,007
As with every language, attend a class and when you have the basics down go spend time in that country.

Don't need perfect grammar.
 

Dingens

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,992
maybe not the best advice but... for the first few years, I'd just ignore articles and declinations. In most cases, these only make a sentence sound "correct", but seldom transport any meaning, particularly not if you're dealing with beginner sentences. Get "fluent" at expressing what you want to say before you start worrying about the allegedly hard parts of the language
 

Amalthea

Member
Dec 22, 2017
1,623
Repeat after me: Nein, Zeitze ist dem Sauerschmarrn plötzeldarb! Hange eine Wulfe blütze bracht.

(Das ist natürlich alles Unsinn.)
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,706
The Romance languages like Portuguese and French have inflection, and there are still plenty of languages with case systems. Native speakers of those languages will have an easier time than English speakers.
What I'm saying is that as an English speaker, German is one of the easiest languages to learn. Obviously there are other languages that provide a better base for learning German.
 

powersurge

Member
Nov 2, 2017
287
Pensacola, FL
I found these sites to be helpful (note I just started attempting to learn myself and I'm finding it very difficult lol)



(only dipped my toe in but its similar to duolingo but it has a lot of videos and flash cards. It's by the lady who does the easy german youtube videos)

 

zer0das

Member
Nov 20, 2017
2,067
Yeah German ist pretty difficult.
Deustch is kein Problem.

If you want difficult try Slavic languages or Asian ones. German you have to worry about cases a bit, but once you learn it, keine Probleme (except really long compund words). Duolingo has been pretty useful for brushing up as someone with an intermediate grasp of German. You might want to get some books for reviewing grammar though, because just learning that through speaking can be difficult.
 

ss1

Member
Oct 27, 2017
222
German is hard for English native speakers. Dealing with split verbs, verb placement, verb conjugation, determiner agreement, gendered nouns, compound nouns, and at the same trying remember which case you are speaking in. As a a learner I feel I have to juggle 100 moving parts in my head at the sametime. But if you preserve it is worth it as it opens up opportunities and for me living in Germany way more easier.
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,458
NZ
Watch German movies/series/YouTube videos every night and listen to stuff (E.g. podcasts) in the background when you can. You'll learn a lot just from pure immersion (and it's absolutely essential in order to improve your listening skills).
 

hobblygobbly

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,132
Baden-Württemberg
as a German myself I recommend that in spoken form, do not worry about grammar (i.e trying to do all the cases correctly). It is not necessary to understand you. For one, you can't actually do the cases properly until you know all the article for the words any ways... and if you can't remember if it's der, die, or das, just use der... any ways any german will know what you mean even if you do not use the right article. do not worry so much about that. do not worry about doing dative case and such perfectly (or even at all) in spoken form, this will literally take you YEARS to get the hang of, and again, not that critical.

what you should focus on:

Pronunciation. This is very important, in German we pronounce *every* letter in a word, there are some rare exceptions, but vast, vast majority it is all pronounced. Think of "knoblauch", that means garlic, do not say it like in English with a silent "kn", say the "k", like "keh". That means also learn your ä, ö, ü. These are their own parts of the alphabet, they are not equivalent to a, o, u. If a word has ä, ö, ü, and you do not pronounce them but rather like a, o, u, people will struggle to understand you, and you will be guaranteed have to repeat yourself.

Also in spoken form, in Germany, we rarely, rarely, ever use FUTURE TENSE. In English future tense is so common. Not in German. e.g. We do not say "I ***will***" etc, trying to use future tense in Germany is unnecessarily complicated for a beginner and colloquially it is not common.

I think this is most important. Once you know this, and learn your vocab, you can communicate much better.

Pronouns/verbs/conjugations.

e.g for kommen (come);

Ich -e (I): komme/heiße
du -st (you, informal): kommst/heißst
er/sie/es -t (he/she/it): kommt/heißt
wir -en (we): kommen/heißen
ihr -t (you all): kommt/heißt
Sie/sie (former formal, latter plural) -en: kommen/heißen

Your W-Frage (literally w-questions):
wo: where
wer: who
wie: how
was: what
warum/wieso: why
wann: when
wie
etc

Commonly used verbs:

Sein (to be) / Haben (to have)
ich: Bin (am) / habe
du: bist (are) / hast
er/sie/es: ist (is) /hat
wir: sind (are/they) / haben
ihr: seid (are) / habt
Sie/sie: sind (are/they) / haben

Separable Prefix Verbs

Auf, aus, an, ein, ab, mit, nach, vor, …

when you see these with verbs, then you can make sentences:
e.g Anfangen - Der Deutschkurs fängt um acht Uhr an.

Possessiv pronouns:
you add the -e when it is feminine/plural. this means you must know the article of the word, but again don't worry about it if you you use -e when it's actually masculine, so dein/deine for e.g if you get them wrong, it doesn't matter that much.

e.g dein Hund (your dog - dog is masc, der Hund)
deine Katze (your cat - cat is fem, die Kat)

ich: mein/e
du:dein/e
er: sein/e
sie: ihr/e
es: sein/e
wir: unser/e
ihr: euer/eure
Sie (formal): Ihr/e
sie (plural):ihr/e

Present tense (haben - “to have”) / Past tense (hatten - “had”)

ich: habe / hatte
du: hast / hattest
er/sie/es: hat / hatte
wir: haben / hatten
ihr: habt / hattet
Sie/sie: haben / hatten

Present tense (sein - “to be”) / Past tense (waren - “was”)
ich: bin / war
du: bist / warst
er/sie/es: ist / war
wir: sind / waren
ihr: seid / wart
Sie/sie: sind /waren

Learn how to compound sentences, this is actually easy and you can do it like you do in English, like "weil" for because, "jedoch" for however, "und" for and, "wenn" for if, etc.

I did not mention dative/accusative case etc here, because you will be surprised, if you learn above, how to compound sentences, and some vocab, how far you can go with conversing in German while trying also construct your sentences sort of like in English.
 
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HulkMansfield

Member
Dec 29, 2017
809
Da simmer dabei! Dat is prima! Viva Colonia!
Wir lieben dat Leben, die Liebe und die Lust
Wir glauben an den Lieben Gott und ham uch immer Durscht

I definitely don't speak it, but song is a great way to pick up a little on your own. I've memorized a few words and phrases just by hearing songs. Of course that means I'm also picking up the Kölsch dialect but whatevs
 

Narroo

Member
Feb 27, 2018
857
Okay, but what about Swiss German? I want to know Swiss German. And I want to learn it without having to put rocks in my mouth.
 

Gemüsepizza

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,003
You write that you want to learn German to progress your career. Are you planning to move to Germany? Because if you don't, I'm not sure that learning German is the best use of your time. According to the US Foreign Service Institute (they provide language training for diplomats etc.), it takes about 900 class hours (with a teacher) to reach "Professional Working Proficiency" in German (if you are an native English speaker, but should be similar for other languages).

And even if you have reached that level, there will be countless German engineers that will speak German much better than you. I don't want to dissuade you from learning German, but if you want to be good it's a huge time investment. And maybe it could be better to invest those ~900+ hours otherwise, for example to become a better engineer or something like that.

Because I'm pretty sure German car companies would rather hire an engineer with excellent abilities / grades that only speaks English than an engineer with average abillities / grades that can also speak some German (of course I don't know anything about your abilities, this was just an example). And you could still learn German after you get hired.

Edit: Not saying that this is the definite way to do it, just something to think about.
 

Zojirushi

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,358
Even if it's not easy based on English, it's not like there's many other easier ones.
What are you even on about. Literally every one of the roman languages is easier than the goddamn mess that is German lol.

@ OP: As a German I can only say that the automotive industry in Germany is probably going south anyway so any chance you can learn something else lol
 

Shodan14

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,706
What are you even on about. Literally every one of the roman languages is easier than the goddamn mess that is German lol.

@ OP: As a German I can only say that the automotive industry in Germany is probably going south anyway so any chance you can earn something else lol
Based on what? English is a Germanic language and has more similarities with German than any roman languages.