I want to learn German

Mendrox

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,839
Just keep doing lessons every day regularly three to four times over the day. Otherwise you will take a long time, but just keep hacking at it and you will do fine. Duolingo won't teach you the language though. Duolingo is just for you to have a fun way to learn a few things, but it won't ever really help you learning a language correctly. Take lessons and work through books.
 

bad kitty

Member
Sep 7, 2018
252
Babylon
I mean if you already speak English, German is one of the easiest languages to learn.
Please stop trolling.

...Also, learn to say "Oachkatzlschwoaf, oida", to earn some Austrian appreciation.
Na klar!

If you get confused with "Der/Die/Das" just use "Dem" for everything, problem solved.

"The car belongs to the the dude at the corner, the mofo with the green hat!"

"Dem Auto gehört dem typen an der Ecke ey, mit dem grünen Hut yo!"

It's that easy!
😂😂😂 I'm dying 😂😂😂

What I'm saying is that as an English speaker, German is one of the easiest languages to learn. Obviously there are other languages that provide a better base for learning German.
....facepalm.gif

OP I recommend taking intensive semester courses at a local Deutschinstitut.
 

Kwigo

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
2,530
Okay, but what about Swiss German? I want to know Swiss German. And I want to learn it without having to put rocks in my mouth.
Learn German, then Pfälzisch (the dialect from Rheinland-Pfalz), then Swiss German from Basel, and then ugly cry when trying to understand anyone that comes from Bern.
 

El-Suave

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,504
There are some good German shows on Netflix and Amazon Prime, they should be available internationally so I would suggest trying watching them with the German audio track and English (or German) subtitles. Exposure like that to a new language is the best way to learn and truly internalize it in my opinion.

Here‘s a good list:
German shows on Netflix and Amazon
 

StraySheep

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,589
What I'm saying is that as an English speaker, German is one of the easiest languages to learn. Obviously there are other languages that provide a better base for learning German.
I'm just going to say as an American who studied Italian in college and lived there for 6 months and who lives in Germany for a year and a half now, Italian is much easier than German. With Italian you instantly know the gender and number of any word, and the genders themselves have more consistency to them. If I remember correctly Italian also has less articles.

And on top of all of that the word order matches better with English than the Yoda speak you get with German.

All of that is to say that German is hard.
 

Fliesen

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,435
I mean it should be even easier if you're already familiar with the concept of gendered nouns and actual cases. Just need to learn a bunch of words and then figure out the pronunciation.
this.

Coming from a language that has more to conjugation than adding an "s" in third person singular and has more (i.e. gendered) articles than "the" and "a".

That should really help.
 

Navidson REC

Member
Oct 31, 2017
617
Duolingo is neat, OP, but the best way to learn it is by taking a course (or three) and then actually immersing yourself in a German-speaking country for at least three months (and by that I mean avoiding living inside a bubble of people who speak your first language). I second those saying that perfect grammar is not needed when speaking. Don't stress out about the articles too much, everyone's gonna understand you. This takes some time.

Machine translation has made learning languages obsolete. Don't waste your time.
What a bizarre blanket statement. You do know that people still talk to each other face-to-face, right? Good luck spending time in southern Germany for an internship with no knowledge of German.
Let alone the value of learning other people's languages in the interest of "Völkerverständigung".
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,443
NZ
Okay, but what about Swiss German? I want to know Swiss German. And I want to learn it without having to put rocks in my mouth.
Eventually I want to learn Alsatian which is rather similar to Swiss German (depending on which exact dialect of course – villages on either side of the Swiss/French border would essentially speak the same dialect for examples) haha. The lack of resources is annoying though, but I guess this would be a bit less of an issue with Swiss German.

Either way, I'll start with Standard German and work my way from there lol. Being able to converse in dialect sounds awesome
 
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Acrano

Member
Nov 2, 2017
255
Germany
as a German myself I recommend that in spoken form, do not worry about grammar (i.e trying to do all the cases correctly). It is not necessary to understand you. For one, you can't actually do the cases properly until you know all the article for the words any ways... and if you can't remember if it's der, die, or das, just use der... any ways any german will know what you mean even if you do not use the right article. do not worry so much about that. do not worry about doing dative case and such perfectly (or even at all) in spoken form, this will literally take you YEARS to get the hang of, and again, not that critical.

what you should focus on:

Pronunciation. This is very important, in German we pronounce *every* letter in a word, there are some rare exceptions, but vast, vast majority it is all pronounced. Think of "knoblauch", that means garlic, do not say it like in English with a silent "kn", say the "k", like "keh". That means also learn your ä, ö, ü. These are their own parts of the alphabet, they are not equivalent to a, o, u. If a word has ä, ö, ü, and you do not pronounce them but rather like a, o, u, people will struggle to understand you, and you will be guaranteed have to repeat yourself.

Also in spoken form, in Germany, we rarely, rarely, ever use FUTURE TENSE. In English future tense is so common. Not in German. e.g. We do not say "I ***will***" etc, trying to use future tense in Germany is unnecessarily complicated for a beginner and colloquially it is not common.

I think this is most important. Once you know this, and learn your vocab, you can communicate much better.

Pronouns/verbs/conjugations.

e.g for kommen (come);

Ich -e (I): komme/heiße
du -st (you, informal): kommst/heißst
er/sie/es -t (he/she/it): kommt/heißt
wir -en (we): kommen/heißen
ihr -t (you all): kommt/heißt
Sie/sie (former formal, latter plural) -en: kommen/heißen

Your W-Frage (literally w-questions):
wo: where
wer: who
wie: how
was: what
warum/wieso: why
wann: when
wie
etc

Commonly used verbs:

Sein (to be) / Haben (to have)
ich: Bin (am) / habe
du: bist (are) / hast
er/sie/es: ist (is) /hat
wir: sind (are/they) / haben
ihr: seid (are) / habt
Sie/sie: sind (are/they) / haben

Separable Prefix Verbs

Auf, aus, an, ein, ab, mit, nach, vor, …

when you see these with verbs, then you can make sentences:
e.g Anfangen - Der Deutschkurs fängt um acht Uhr an.

Possessiv pronouns:
you add the -e when it is feminine/plural.

e.g dein Hund (your dog - dog is masc, der Hund)
deine Katze (your cat - cat is fem, die Kat)

ich: mein/e
du:dein/e
er: sein/e
sie: ihr/e
es: sein/e
wir: unser/e
ihr: euer/eure
Sie (formal): Ihr/e
sie (plural):ihr/e

Present tense (haben - “to have”) / Past tense (hatten - “had”)

ich: habe / hatte
du: hast / hattest
er/sie/es: hat / hatte
wir: haben / hatten
ihr: habt / hattet
Sie/sie: haben / hatten

Present tense (sein - “to be”) / Past tense (waren - “was”)
ich: bin / war
du: bist / warst
er/sie/es: ist / war
wir: sind / waren
ihr: seid / wart
Sie/sie: sind /waren

Learn how to compound sentences, this is actually easy and you can do it like you do in English, like "weil" for because, "jedoch" for however, "und" for and, etc.

I did not mention dative/accusative case etc here, because you will be surprised, if you learn above, how to compound sentences, and some vocab, how far you can go with conversing in German while trying also construct your sentences sort of like in English.
Well, I was in the process to write a similar text as a native german speaker but hobblygobbly already has you covered. It´s not easy but if you think it will help you in the future go for it.
 

SPRidley

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,157
Im sorry, I just found this song yesterday on Wolfenstein 2 and it reminded me when I read the thread's title lol
 
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Acrano

Member
Nov 2, 2017
255
Germany
I am not a native German but I watch German TV sometimes. When did people stop pronouncing the "t" in "nicht"?
Could be due to dialect, in noth germany they don´t pronounce the "t" in some regions. Others say ned instead of nicht: "Das geht so nicht" "Das geht so ned /net" like in bavaria.

Or it could be the due to a lot of people not learning or not willing to speak proper german.
 
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Imp the Dimp

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,240
Don't prioritize getting the (definite) articles right. It's night impossible unless you're a native + they generally carry absolutely no meaning at all. My advice is to not bother with the language. It's too hard, it sounds terrible, and English comprehension over here is stadily increasing with boomers gradually retiring and younger people filling up their spots.
 

Kanhir

Member
Oct 25, 2017
551
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ArtVandelay

Member
May 29, 2018
2,118
What a bizarre blanket statement. You do know that people still talk to each other face-to-face, right? Good luck spending time in southern Germany for an internship with no knowledge of German.
Let alone the value of learning other people's languages in the interest of "Völkerverständigung".

I'm a translator and I love learning languages. But if you think you're doing it for your career, don't.
This is what I meant. Translation apps will be used in face-to-face conversation as well. Think "Snowpiercer".
Learning languages is still great for your private life, but it's not necessary for your job in the long term.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,063
Dont be deterred! If you speak English German is an easier language to learn than the romance languages in my opinion. It's a very logical language and lots of English speech patterns originated from German (well....they developed out of the same root).

Took 3 years of German in college and online courses after.... I hadn't really spoken German for about 15 years but I was in Munich and Frankfurt last week and found myself stumbling through the language pretty effectively.

Also Germans in Germany are very nice and accepting of Americans trying to speak German. They're not like the French or Southern Italians.
 

mcfizzle

Member
Oct 27, 2017
171
Germany
German is definitely not easy but if you stick with it it's a rewarding process. Is there a Goethe Institute near you where you could take classes? I definitely recommend learning the articles of nouns right away. It makes it a lot easier on you if you do it now rather than later and don't listen to anyone who says they don't matter. They absolutely do and make you and the language sound much better when used correctly. At the same time, don't stress about mistakes. You'll get it with time.

I'd recommend following something like Deutsch mit Marija on Facebook and YouTube.

Another App that I found good was Memrize. The problem I found though was that doesn't really teach grammar.

To give you an idea of my experience:
I moved to Germany 4 years ago with a very basic level of German. I took one year of German classes at a Volkshochschule, from A1 level to C1, 4 hours a day 5 days a week. I passed the C1 exam and I'm now studying Physical Therapy and work, both in German. I learn something new about the language every single day.
 
Oct 27, 2017
104
Also, learn to say "Oachkatzlschwoaf, oida", to earn some Austrian appreciation.
Bavarians will also appreciate your impeccable taste in dialects if you can do this.

Also, don't worry about articles, even we can't make up our minds about them. For example, where I come from, it's called "der Butter", but most other Germans call it "die Butter".

Oh, and try to have some fun :D. Watch some German shows, listen to German music, and maybe watch German dubs of movies you already know. The Star Wars OT has an excellent German dub, for example, and the Monty Python movies are great as well, though they do take some liberties translation-wise.
 

Alice

Member
Nov 2, 2017
4,239
Try out Doulingo and don't worry about perfecting German until you're able to understand what people say when they speak.

Grammar breaks most people ehrn they try to learn German, so try to focus on conversation first, grammar should be easier then.
 

hobblygobbly

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,126
Baden-Württemberg
I am not a native German but I watch German TV sometimes. When did people stop pronouncing the "t" in "nicht"?
colloquially depends on the dialect, often -e is dropped from words like habe too, and the region I am in, we even drop stuff like the -ch from ich, mich, and dich so it's like i, mi and di lol, and we add -le to a lot of words, instead of mädchen it's mädle, bisschen it's bissle, etc.


one of the biggest challenge for german learners is actually having to deal with all the dialects. and not just learners, us native speakers too... I am not originally from Schwaben... but I live/work here for a while now so this dialect is a nightmare for me, they even tell the time differently from the north.
 
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